5 September 1912. John Milton Cage born in Los Angeles, California, Good Samaritan Hospital. His grandfather, Gustavus Adolphus Williamson Cage, was a Methodist Episcopal preacher; his father, also John Milton Cage (Los Angeles, 11 March 1886-1964), was an electrical engineer and inventor; his mother, Lucretia (“Crete”) Harvey (1885-1968), was active in women’s study clubs and wrote columns for the Los Angeles Times. They married in 1907 or 1908. Two elder brothers had died before Cage was born: Gustavus Adolphus Williamson III Cage at birth, John Milton Cage after two weeks. Cage’s early childhood was spent in Long Beach, California, which became a summer home when the family moved to Detroit (Cage/Cope 1980, 22; Peyser 1976, 55; Revill 1992, 19; Tomkins 1965, 76).

1916-1921. When Cage’s father worked at the University of Michigan, the family moved to Detroit, Michigan, followed by a brief sojourn in Ford City, Ontario. Cage began kindergarten in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He had a tutor at home until he entered elementary school, beginning with the third grade, in Detroit Public Schools (September 1918; the family then lived at 907, Second Avenue); in 1920, the family lived in the Stevenson (20 Davenport Avenue), a residence hotel (Cage 1987-1988c; Cage 1987-1988f; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 36).

1920. Cage family returned to California (Glendale, Long Beach, Ocean Park, Santa Monica, Eagle Rock). Took piano lessons, first with a neighborhood teacher, later with his maternal aunt Phoebe James, who taught him sight-reading and who introduced him to the music of Moritz Moszkowski and Edvard Grieg (Cage 1961h, 88, 115, 263; Cage 1991c; Cage/Reynolds 1962/1962, 45; Campana 1985, 8; Tomkins 1965, 76-77).

September 1922. Entered Los Angeles High School; focused on languages (English, French, Greek, perhaps Latin); took piano lessons with Fannie Charles Dillon (1881-1947), a pianist and composer at the music faculty (Campana 1985, 8; Hendrick 1972; Stevenson, Robert 1982, 5-7).

Circa 1924. Not qualified to participate in Los Angeles High School Glee Club (Cage 1973h, 98; Cage/Boenders 1980, 217).

Circa 1924. Played violin sonatas by Ludwig van Beethoven with unidentified violinist (Yates 1967, 303).

1924. Los Angeles, California. Began weekly radio show at KNX (for two years).

8 September 1925. Re-entered Los Angeles High School (four-year Junior High curriculum). Took courses: English Literature, English Oral Expression, English Composition, French, Greek, Mathematics, Science, Drawing (first semester), Typewriting (second year, first semester), History, Vocal Music (second year, first semester), Physical Training and Hygiene, Military.

Fall 1926. Became contributing editor of the school’s monthly French newspaper, Le Flambeau.

Prior to 27 May 1927. Wrote Other People Think [text].

27 May 1927. Los Angeles, California. Representing Los Angeles High School, entered Southern California Oratical Contest with Other People Think (Cage 1970j; Kostelanetz 1970d, 45n).

Spring 1928. Los Angeles, California, Hollywood Bowl (2301 North Highland Avenue). Representing Los Angeles High School, won Southern California Oratical Contest with presentation of Other People Think (Cage 1970j; Kostelanetz 1970d, 45n).

29 June 1928. Graduated from Los Angeles High School, where he was class valedictorian; valedictorian address: International Patriotism (Hendrick 1972; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 36).

1 July 1928. Camping trip (Barnes, R. 1966).

August 1928. Worked at beach (Barnes, R. 1966).

21 September 1928-June 1930. Claremont, California. Matriculated Pomona College (freshman and sophomore classes); studied Liberal Arts (courses first year: History, Mathematics, English, German, French, Physical Education [Hygiene, Gymnastics, Sports], Music [Choir], Religion [Orientation]; second year: German [Advanced], Philosophy [Introduction to Logics], Music [Choir], English [Short Story Writing, 19th-Century Literature, Types of Drama], French [17th-Century Prose], Aesthetics, Physical Education [Gymnastics, Sport], Honors Hours); occupational outlook: ministry, church membership: Methodist Episcopal; through his roommate, the later printer Gregg Anderson, became interested in typography; during his studies, won the Jennings English Contest; dropped out (June 1930) (Anonymous 1975JOHN; Barnes, R. 1966; Cage 1961h, x; Cage 1967c, 15; Martin, L. 1930; Morin and Dawson 1929; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 36; Stevenson, Robert 1982, 7-8).

April 1929 or earlier. Wrote “Song Ghosts” [text] for Manuscript, published by Scribblers Society, a student group at Pomona College with contributions from Scripps College.

Before December 1929. Wrote The Immaculate Medawewing [text].

1930. Lived with his parents at 2708 Moss Avenue, Los Angeles, California.

June 1930. Claremont, California. Dropped out of Pomona College (note to the College Registrar 2 June) and sailed to Paris; briefly studied architecture with Ernö Goldfinger; with a letter of introduction by the Comtesse de Constant, for whom he played a slow movement of a Beethoven sonata, took two piano lessons with Lazare-Lévy (1882-1964) at the Conservatoire, who made him discover the music of Bach, whereas attendance of a recital by pianist John Kirkpatrick (Stravinsky, Serenade, Scriabin, Preludes) made him become interested in modern music; played Hindemith, Stravinsky, Scriabin, Bach, especially from Das neue Klavierbuch: Eine Sammlung zeitgenössischer Komponisten. Ed. by H. Autenrieth-Schleußner. Mainz [etc.]: Schott, 1927, two volumes (Ed. Schott; 1400-1401). In Paris he also became acquainted with the music of Erik Satie, which was to become a lifelong source of inspiration (Barnes, R. 1966; Cage 1934; Cage 1961h, 261; Cage 1967o, 114; Cage/Kostelanetz 1968/1970, 33; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 36; Tomkins 1965, 79).

Summer 1930-1931. Began wandering Europe. On Capri he met Don Sample (Donald St. Paul), an American poet and painter, with whom he had his first lasting sexual relationship, and who became his mentor. Together they traveled to Biskra in Algeria, where they spent the winter of 1930-1931; wrote poetry, painted (Cage/Brumel 1982, 66; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 36; Tomkins 1965, 80).

8 August-13 September 1931. Sóller, Majorca. Composed his first composition, [Untitled]. Contrary to Cage’s repeated claim to the contrary, most his early works survives (Cage 1961h, 234-235; Cage 1991c, 56; Cage/Duckworth 1989, 16).

Fall 1931. Madrid (Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 36).

Fall 1931. With Don Sample, travelled from Sevilla to Berlin and then back to Spain, to return to California in December via Cuba and Florida (Cage 1970i, 115-116; Cage 1991c; Tomkins 1965, 80).

December 1931. Returned to California, lived with his parents in the Pacific Palisades, continued writing, painting and composing, supporting himself by checking out patents for his father, until 1933 (Barnes, R. 1966; Cage 1961h, 273; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 36).

1931-1934. In California, where he first lived at his parents home in the Pacific Palisades, later in Santa Monica, still later in Carmel, Cage held a variety of jobs.

1931 or 1932. Composed Etudes for piano.

1932. Moved to Santa Monica, California. Worked as a gardener in an auto court in and as a local lecturer on modern painting and music to housewives, until 1933 (Cage 1961h, 273; Cage/White, R. 1978, 3; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 36; Tomkins 1965, 80-81)

1932-1934 or -1935. Took informal lessons in composition with the pianist Richard Buhlig (Bühlig, 1880-1952) in Los Angeles (Cage 1961h, 273; Cage/Schindler 1996, 8; Campana 1985, 9-10).

1932. Cage and Sample met Harry Hay (1912-2002), who sang Cage’s early songs in several small public concerts (Cage 1991c).

Prior to October 1932. Composed Greek Ode and third of Three Songs.

Fall 1932. Composed The Preacher.

November 1932. Santa Monica, California, Santa Monica Women’s Club. Performed with Harry Hay, basso cantante: Three Songs (third song, first performance); first performance of Greek Ode; The Preacher and Etudes.

1933. Completed Three Songs.

April 1933. Los Angeles, California, California Composers’ Soiree. Performed (piano) with Harry Hay, basso cantante: Greek Ode, The Preacher, Three Songs (third song only).

May 1933. Composed Three Easy Pieces.

May 1933. Los Angeles, California. Introduced by Verna Arvey at the Manuscript Club meetings organized by Mary Carr Moore, performed an unidentified prelude for piano and, with Harry Hay, Greek Ode and “At East and Ingredients” from Three Songs (Smith, Ca.P. 1995).

June 1933. Los Angeles, California, Manuscript Club meeting organized by Mary Carr Moore. Performed several unidentified piano pieces, apparently provoking Moore and being sent away by her (Smith, Ca.P. 1995).

1 July 1933. Los Angeles, California, Hollywood Bowl (2301 North Highland Avenue). Presumably attended several concerts given under the direction of Nicolas Slonimsky, among which a concert including Edgard VarŹse’s Ionisation (16 July) (Slonimsky 2012, 86-139).

3 September 1933. Los Angeles, California. Completed first movement of Sonata for Clarinet.

5 September 1933. Los Angeles, California. Completed third movement of Sonata for Clarinet.

September 1933 or later. Failed attemps at getting Sonata for Clarinet performed (Cage/Kirby and Schechner 1965, 58-59).

Fall 1933-mid-April 1934. Through Richard Buhlig met Henry Cowell (1897-1965) and studied dissonant counterpoint and composition with him for a season (Cowell, H. 1952).

Late October-3 November 1933. Santa Monica, California. Composed Sonata for Two Voices.

1933. Carmel, California. Became interested in mushroom hunting (Lyon 1965).

1933-1934. Carmel, California. Composed Solo with Obbligato Accompaniment of Two Voices in Canon, and Six Short Inventions on the Subjects of the Solo.

Late 1933 or early 1934. Made the acquaintance of Xenia Andreyevna Kashevaroff (15 August 1913-26 September 1995), an art student at Reed College in Portland, Oregon.

15 January 1934. Ojai, California. Completed Composition for Three Voices, dedicated to Pauline Schindler (1893-1977), with whom Cage had an affair around the time. Part of their correspondence survives. Cage practiced the French horn in these days, until summer 1935 (Cage/Schindler 1996; Hines 1989; Hines 1994).

February 1934. Composed Music for Xenia.

After February 1934. Seattle, Washington. Music for Xenia first performed; performer unknown.

Prior to 15 February 1934. Wrote Counterpoint (text).

7 March 1934. Carmel, California. Completed Solo with Obbligato Accompaniment of Two Voices in Canon from Solo with Obbligato Accompaniment of Two Voices in Canon, and Six Short Inventions on the Subjects of the Solo.

5 April 1934. Carmel, California. Completed Six Short Inventions from Solo with Obbligato Accompaniment of Two Voices in Canon, and Six Short Inventions on the Subjects of the Solo.

After 5 April-late December 1934 or later. At the recommendation of Henry Cowell, studied traditional harmony and composition privately with Adolph Weiss (1891-1971) in New York, at the same time attending Cowell’s courses in modern harmony, rhythm, survey of contemporary music and non-Western music (“Music of the World’s Peoples” or “Primitive and Folk Origins of Music”, twelve lectures) at the New School for Social Research (Fall). In December, returned to California with Cowell (Cage 1959NOTES/AVAKIAN/1970, 127; Cage 1970[NEW], 118; Cage 1973h, 132, 144; Cage/Schindler 1996, 3-4; Campana 1985, 20; Hicks 1990; Kopp 1981, 144-145; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 36).

Spring-fall 1934. Brooklyn, New York, Young Women’s Christian Association. Took job as wall-washer (Cage 1961h, 268).

Late summer 1934. Composed Allemande under the tutelage of Adolph Weiss.

Fall 1934. Arnold Schoenberg (1874-1951), who had arrived in New York in November 1933, moved to California, where he was appointed at both the University of California in Los Angeles and the University of Southern California (Hicks 1990; Rubsamen 1951; Zam 1979-1980).

Late December 1934. Returned to California.

Circa 1935. Santa Monica, California. Composed Two Pieces for Piano (circa 1935).

1935. Santa Monica, California and Seattle, Washington. Composed Three Pieces for Flute Duet; second movement completed in March.

18 March 1935-1937. Los Angeles, California. Studied analysis in small group sessions (with Bernice Shapiro and others) with Arnold Schoenberg at his home in Hollywood. Later also attended several of Schoenberg’s classes in composition, harmony, and counterpoint at the University of Southern California and at the University of California at Los Angeles (from Fall 1936). Although Cage seems to have been dissatisfied with Schoenberg’s teaching methods at the time, he later said he “worshipped” Schoenberg. According to the entrepreneur Peter Yates (1909-1976), Schoenberg remarked in later years of Cage: “He is not a composer, but an inventor­–of genius.” Concurrently with his lessons with Schoenberg, Cage was Library Research Worker for a lawyer promoting his father’s patents (Austin, W.W. 1966, 318; Cage/Schindler, 18; Campana 1985, 29; Feisst 2011; Hicks 1990; Rubsamen 1951; Tomkins 1965, 84-85; Yates 1959d, 20; Yates 1967).

Prior to 28 April 1935. Santa Monica, California. Composed Quest.

Spring 1935. Carmel, California. First performance (presumably) of Allemande.

28-30 April 1935. Los Angeles, California, University of California, Josiah Royce Hall, Auditorium, A Program of Dances presented by the Department of Physical Education for Women and the associated students, directed by Martha B. Deane, Robert Tyler Lee, and Josephine L. Ketcik. In shared program, with unknown performer, gave first performance of Quest to Quest by Martha B. Deane (Hering 1946).

1 May 1935. Los Angeles, California. Private meeting with Arnold Schönberg; allowed to continue his classes.

7 June 1935. Yuma, Arizona. Married Xenia Kashevaroff (Cage 1959g, [8]; Campana 1985, 29).

1935-1937. Library Research Worker (Campana 1985, 29).

Circa 1936. Met Lou Harrison, who introduced him to the I Ching and to the music of Anton Webern (Cage/Anonymous 1988RÉPONSES, 117; Cage/McElhearn 1988, 119; Cage/Raymond and Roberts 1980, 9; Cage/Shapiro 1985, 103).

Circa 1936. Santa Monica, California. Composed Quartet and Trio.

Early Spring 1936. Introduced through Galka Scheyer to Oskar Fischinger, who intended to make movie with music by Cage; the project remained unfinished (Cage/Charles 1976, 68/1981, 73; Cage/Duckworth 1989, 18-19; Campana 1985, 21-22; Herzogenrath 1979, 26).

1936. Los Angeles, California, University of California, Demonstration School. Assistant in the Elementary School, worked as an accompanist, until 1938 (Campana 1985, 29; Stevenson, Robert 1982, 8).

1936. Los Angeles, California. Studied bookbinding with Hazel Dreis, a pupil of Lawrence de Coverley, together with Xenia Cage. Began collecting percussion instruments and forming various percussion ensembles, first a quartet with fellow students studying bookbinding with Dreis, in whose house he lived with Xenia, later with Lou Harrison (1917-2003) in San Francisco; moved to Seattle, Washington (Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 37).

Late 1936 or winter 1936-1937. Santa Monica, California, Hazel Dreis’s apartment. With others gave first inofficial performances of Trio and Quartet.

1937. Los Angeles, California. Joined modern dance group at University of California, as accompanist and composer (Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 37).

Ca. 5 January 1937. Los Angeles, California, Arnold Schoenberg’s house (Brentwood, 116 North Rockingham Avenue). Attended rehearsal of Schoenberg’s Fourth Quartet with Kolisch Quartet and dinner; other guests included Joseph Achron, Richard Buhlig, Otto Klemperer, Edward Steuermann, and Gerald Strang (Feisst 2011; Los Angeles Times 1937).

Spring 1937. Los Angeles, California, Oskar Fischinger’s studio. Apprenticed for two months with Oskar Fischinger for Metro Goldwin Mayer studios on the film An Optical Poem.

27 June-30 July 1937. Beverly Hills, California, Virginia Hall Johnson School of Dance. Instructor in percussion (Campana 1985, 29).

Prior to or during fall 1937. Seattle, Washington. Wrote Listening to Music [text].

Fall 1937. First read Listening to Music [text].

1937-1938 (according to Frans van Rossum: 1936). Employed as an accompanist, both at Santa Monica Public Schools and assisting his aunt Phoebe James, who was then elementary music supervisor at the University of California, Los Angeles, Demonstration School. She taught an extension course, “Musical Accompaniments for Rhythmic Expression” (Campana 1985, 29; Stevenson, Robert 1982).

Early 1938. Westwood, California, University of California at Los Angeles, Training School Faculty. Taught extension course, “Musical Accompaniments for Rhythmic Expression,” with his aunt Phoebe James (Campana 1985, 29).

April 1938-fall 1940. Presumably in the Spring moved to Seattle, Washington with Xenia.

Seattle, Washington. Composed Metamorphosis; movements completed on 17 April (I), 14 April (II), 1 May (III), 8 May (IV), 20 May (V).

27 June-30 July 1938. Beverly Hills, California, Virginia Hall Johnson Studio of Dance. Gave percussion course.

Prior to 2 July 1938. Composed untitled music for an aquatic ballet.

2-4 July 1938. Los Angeles, California, Exposition Park, Olympic Swim Stadium, National Aquatic Show. Arranged and performed (with others) an accompaniment for an aquatic ballet [untitled].

July 1938. Seattle, Washington. Composed Five Songs for Contralto.

September 1938-summer 1939. Seattle, Washington, Cornish School, led by Nellie C. Cornish (1876-1956). Faculty Member. Cage was employed for “Creative Composition and Percussion Instruments” as composer and accompanist for the classes in modern dance taught by Bonnie Bird (1914-1995); other faculty members included Margaret Jansen (piano) and Doris Dennison (Dalcroze eurythmics); met the dancer and choreographer Mercier Cunningham (1919-2009) – who was at the time studying with Bird (1937-1939, after which he went to New York to work with the Martha Graham Dance Company) and who later came to call himself Merce –, and the artists Mark Tobey (1890-1967) and Morris Graves (1910-2001) (Cage 1979c, 199-121; Campana 1985, 30; Cage/Kostelanetz 1968WE/1970, 20; Los Angeles Times 1938a; Seattle Post-Intelligencer 1938; Seattle Star 1938a; Seattle Times 1938a; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 37; Stevenson, Robert 1982, 9-10).

Fall 1938. Seattle, Washington. Presented concerts of music for percussion orchestra in collaboration with Lou Harrison, Ray Green (1908-1997), Gerald Strang (1908-1983), William Russell (William Russell Wagner, 1905-1992) and a few others, collected instruments and made tours through the Northwest (Kim 2012a; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 37; Vanlandingham 1971, 42).

Fall 1938. Seattle, Washington, Cornish Theatre. Performed with Xenia Cage, Doris Dennison and Margaret Jansen: first public performance of Quartet; met painter Morris Graves; shared a house with him, Malcolm Roberts, and Xenia Cage (Cage 1979c, 99-121; Campbell, R.M. 1983b; Dunn 1962, 38 [mentions 1937 as date]).

Fall 1938. Seattle, Washington. With Xenia Cage arranged exhibition of Morris Graves’s series The Purification of Cardinal Pacelli (Cage 1979c, 99).

7 October 1938. Seattle, Washington, Cornish Theatre. Accompanied (Patterson, D.W. 1996, 252; Stevenson, Robert 1982, 11).

10 October 1938. Seattle, Washington, Hotel Sorrento. Following the annual dinner meeting of the Seattle Chapter of Pro Musica, gave lecture-recital on “Some Aspects of Modern Music” including first performance of Metamorphosis and music by George McKay (Dunn 1962, 8; Patterson, D.W. 1996, 252; Seattle Times 1938b).

22 October 1938. Seattle, Washington. Completed Music for Wind Instruments, Trio.

24 October 1938. Seattle, Washington. Completed Music for Wind Instruments, Duet.

31 October 1938. Seattle, Washington. Completed Music for Wind Instruments, Quintet.

9 December 1938 (evening). Seattle, Washington, Cornish School (Roy and Harvard North), Theatre. Performed with Xenia Cage, Edna Mae Coffman, Mercier Cunningham, Doris Dennison, and Joyce Wike, assisted by Bonnie Bird and Cornish dancers: Trio (Cage, Xenia Cage, Dennison, first public performance) and Quartet (announced as Quartette, performed on gongs, drums, wood blocks, triangles, automobile parts); Ray Green, 3 Inventories of Casey Jones (piano and four percussionists, performed twice, the second time with dance by Bonnie Bird, Dorothy Herrmann, Mercier Cunningham, Syvilla Fort); William Russell, Waltz and Fox Trot; Gerald Strang, Music for 3 Players (Dunn 1962, 39; Los Angeles Times 1938b; Seattle Ballard News 1938; Seattle Star 1938b; Stevenson, Robert 1982, 11).

1939. Applied in vain for a job as music teacher at Black Mountain College (Cage 1979c, 96).

Prior to 1 January 1939. Moved to Carmel, California, with Xenia; began giving concerts of percussion music with Lou Harrison and William Russell in San Francisco, California; worked as recreational leader for the Federal Music Project of the Works Progress Administration (1935-1941) (Pine Cone 1939; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 37; Stevenson, Robert 1982, 12).

11 January 1939. Tacoma, Washington, College of Puget Sound, Jones Hall. Accompanied Bonnie Bird and Cornish Dancers; performed with Xenia Cage, Edna Mae Coffman, Doris Dennison, and Joyce Wike: Ray Green, 3 Inventories of Casey Jones (Seattle News Tribune 1939; Seattle Times 1939a; Stevenson, Robert 1982, 12).

30 January 1939. Seattle, Washington, Seattle Repertory Theater, sponsored by the Seattle Symphonic League. Accompanied Bonnie Bird and Cornish Dancers (Stevenson, Robert 1982, 12).

February-22 February 1939. Seattle, Washington, Cornish School. Exhibition of modern decorative textiles by Jane Givan and Bruce Johnston and handbound books by John Cage and Xenia Cage (Seattle Times 1939c; Stevens, T. 1939).

Prior to 14 February 1939. Seattle, Washington. Interviewed with Xenia Cage by Theresa Stevens (Stevens, T. 1939).

18 February 1939. Seattle, Washington, Textile Tower, Ernst Kassowitz Studio. Participated in open discussion, “What Next in American Art?,” with Dudley Pratt (sculptor) and Bonnie Bird (dancer).

26 February 1939. Seattle, Washington, Repertory Theatre, The Artists League of Seattle. Performed with Xenia Cage, Edna Mae Coffman, Doris Dennison, and Joyce Wike: Ray Green, Three Inventories of Casey Jones.

Spring 1939. Seattle, Washington, Cornish School, radio studio. Composed, recorded and gave first performance (as presentation of recording) of Imaginary Landscape No. 1, with Xenia Cage, Doris Dennison and Margaret Jansen (Dunn 1962, 36).

7 March 1939. Seattle, Washington, University of Washington, Anderson Hall. Music for Wind Instruments, second movement first performed by Whitney Tustion, oboe; Alvin Schardt, horn.

Prior to 24 March 1939. Seattle, Washington. Composed Ho to AA.

24-25 March 1939 (evenings). Seattle, Washington, Cornish Theatre (710 East Roy Street), Hilarious Dance Concert: with Doris Dennison performed Ho to AA (first performance); with Bonnie Bird Dance Group (including Bonnie Bird, Merce Cunningham, Syvilla Fort, Dorothy Herrmann), Cage, piano and musical director, and Dennison gave first performance of Marriage at the Eiffel Tower; presumably Imaginary Landscape No. 1; Ray Green, Three Inventories of Casey Jones; Weiner, Greunberg, and Peryrek, music to Bird, Skinny Structures; Bird’s dances Contemporary Challenge (first performance) and Kosa, music to Of a Tender Age were also performed (Cage 1969a [under Cowell and McKay]; Schumacher 1939; Seattle Argus 1939; Seattle Ballard News 1939a; Seattle Ballard News 1939b; Seattle Garfield Messenger 1939a; Seattle Garfield Messenger 1939b; Seattle New-Dealer 1939; Seattle Post-Intelligencer 1939c; Seattle Post-Intelligencer 1939e; Seattle Tribune 1939; Stevenson, Robert 1982, 13; Vaughan 1997, 18-19; Washington Times 1939).

15 April 1939. Corvallis, Oregon. Accompanied Bonnie Bird in master lesson at dance symposium (OAC Barometer 1939; Stevenson, Robert 1982, 14).

26 April 1939. Seattle, Washington, Cornish School (710 East Roy Street), Hilarious Dance Concert of 24-25 March repeated (Stevenson, Robert 1982, 14).

19 May 1939. Seattle, Washington, Cornish School, Theatre. Performed with Xenia Cage, Merce Cunningham, Doris Dennison, Imogene Horsley, Lenore Hovey, Margaret Jansen, and Lenore Thayer: Trio (with Xenia Cage and Dennison); Henry Cowell, Pulse [and, according to Lichtenwanger, Return]; William Russell, Waltz, Foxtrot, March Suite and Studies in Cuban Rhythms; Lou Harrison, Counterdance in the Spring and Fifth Simfony [sic]; Johanna M. Beyer (1888-1944), Three Movements (Restless, Endless, Tactless) (Dunn 1962, 39; Lichtenwanger 1986, 168-169; N.E. Independence 1939; Seattle Post-Intelligencer 1939a).

1939-1941. Mostly during the summers, Cage worked as accompanist and composer for choreographer Marian Van Tuyl, at Mills College (Revill 1992, 75).

Summer 1939. Oakland, California, Mills College, Summer Session. With Lou Harrison taught class “Percussion for Accompanists”; worked as an accompanist for Marian Van Tuyl’s dance classes (Campana 1985, 40).

Summer [23 June-3 August?] 1939. Oakland, California, Mills College. On faculty; worked as composer for Marian Van Tuyl (Marian Van Tuyl Campbell [1907-1987], at Mills 1938-1970), where he taught classes on percussion music with Lou Harrison. Also at Mills College, Cage made his acquaintance of Virgil Thomson (1896-1989), who was to become Cage’s most powerful advocate during his first years in New York (Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 37 [error]).

19 June-29 July 1939. Seattle, Washington, Cornish School, Summer Session. Offered four courses: “Experimental Music,” “Modern Dance Composition,” “Creative Music Education for Teachers,” and “Creative Music for Children” (Seattle Post-Intelligencer 1939b; Seattle Post-Intelligencer 1939d).

27 July 1939. Oakland, California, Mills College, under the auspices of the Bennington Summer School of the Modern Dance. Performed with Xenia Cage, Doris Dennison and Margaret Jansen: Quartet (first movement only); William Russell, Cuban Rhythms and Three Dance Movements; Lou Harrison, Counterdance in the Spring; Franziska Boas, Changing Tensions (Williams, B.M. 1990, 224; Dunn 1962, 38; Frankenstein 1939).

25 August 1939 [not 5 August]. Monterey, California, Margaret Lial’s Music Store (Alvarado Street). Lectured on percussion music by himself, Johanna Beyer, Henry Cowell, Lou Harrison, and William Russell (on piano and with records) (Williams, B.M. 1990, 224; Monterey Peninsula Herald 1939).

September 1939. Returned to Seattle, Washington in connection with his commitments at the Cornish School (Campana 1985, 40; Vancouver News Herald 1939).

November 1939. Seattle, Washington. Composed First Construction (in Metal).

Before or during December 1939. Seattle, Washington. Wrote Goal: New Music, New Dance.

9 December 1939. Seattle, Washington, Cornish Theatre. Conducted unidentified ensemble (eleven performers) in first performance of First Construction (in Metal); first presentation (as a recording) of Imaginary Landscape No. 1 [uncertain]; Henry Cowell, Pulse and Return; William Russell, Fugue for Eight Percussion Instruments and Three Dance Movements; Mildred Couper, Dirge; Amadeo Roldán, Ritmicas V and VI (Brown, Gilbert 1939; Dunn 1962, 35, 36; Seattle Times 1939b).

1939-1 January 1940. Seattle, Washington. Composed Second Construction.

1939 or 1940. Composed Four Songs of the Moment and Spiritual (Cerchio 1985, 44).

Circa 1940. Composed Haitian Rhythms.

1940 [not 1937]. Wrote “The Future of Music: Credo” (text) (Miller, L.E. 2000, 230-231).

1940. Composed Dance Music for Elfrid Ide.

1940 APPROX. Photo (Cage/Smith, S.S. 1983PERC, 5).

1940. Seattle, Washington, Cornish School. Imaginary Landscape No. 1 [or possibly Imaginary Landscape No. 2 [1940]) presented as music to the dance, Imaginary Landscape, by Bonnie Bird (Dunn 1962, 36).

1940-1941 (circa). Made an abortive application to work for the Federal Music Project sponsored by the Works Progress Administration (1935-1941). Instead he was employed as recreation director, working with children in hospitals and schools in San Francisco and with camp counselors in Mendocino County (Cage/White, R. 1978, 12).

8 January 1940. Moscow, Idaho, University of Idaho, University Auditorium, presented by Public Events Committee. Performed with Cage Percussion Players (Xenia Cage, Doris Dennison, Margaret Jansen): Quartet (drums, cowbells, cymbal, gongs, woodblocks, temple blocks); Johanna M. Beyer, Two Movements (Endless, Restless); Ray Green, Inventories of Casey Jones; Lou Harrison, Counterdance in the Spring; William Russell, (two of?) Three Dance Movements; March Suite; Studies in Cuban Rhythms (Dunn 1962, 38).

9 January 1940. Walla Walla, Washington, Whitman College (345 Boyer Avenue), Student Union Auditorium. Performed with Cage Percussion Players: program identical with concert of 8 January 1940; interviewed by anonymous reporter of Whitman College Pioneer (Whitman College Pioneer 1940).

January-February 1940. Also gave concerts in Montana and Whitman College, Washington (Williams, B.M. 1990, 225).

14 February 1940. Portland, Oregon, Reed College: with Xenia Cage, Doris Dennison and Margaret Jansen gave first performance of Second Construction and performed Quartet (Avshalomoff 1940; Dunn 1962, 38; Oregonian 1940).

After 15 February 1940. Seattle, Washington, Seattle Arts Society, Open Meeting, organized by Bonnie Bird. Read The Future of Music: Credo (Cage 1961h, 3; Miller, L.E. 2005; University of Washington Daily 1940).

March 1940. Seattle, Washington. Composed Bacchanale.

Before 28 April 1940. Seattle, Washington. Composed Prelude to Flight.

28 April 1940 (evening). Seattle, Washington, Repertory Playhouse [not Cornish Theatre], presented by the Seattle Artists League. Performed with Frances Chatters Brooks (piano) and Syvilla Fort (dance): gave first performances of Bacchanale, Prelude to Flight, and Spiritual; also performed were Still, Nocturne; Bloom-Fort, Self-Portrait; Wiener, Entertainer (Cage 1973d; Dunn 1962, 16; Patterson, D.W. 1996, 260; Pritchett 1993, 206n15; University District Herald 1940).

1 May 1940. Seattle, Washington. Completed Imaginary Landscape No. 2 (1940), withdrawn after its first performance; this explains why Imaginary Landscape No. 3 of 1942 chronologically precedes Imaginary Landscape No. 2 of the same year.

7-11 May 1940. Seattle, Washington, Cornish School, Theatre, presented by the American Dance Theatre. In shared program, accompanied Dorothy Herrmann: Four Songs of the Moment (first performance); Syvilla Fort: Spiritual; conducted Imaginary Landscape No. 2 (1940), choreography Bonnie Bird, danced by Bonnie Bird, Syvilla Fort, Dorothy Herrmann, Cole Weston, and performed by Marie Balagno, Xenia Cage, Doris Dennison, Imogene Horsely, Margaret Jansen, Helen McDonald, Walter Nelskog, technician (first performance); with Gerard Van Steenbergen, narrator, and with Doris Dennison (second pianist), accompanied America Was Promises (choreography Bonnie Bird, eighteen dancers); Virginia Boren interviewed Bonnie Bird (Boren 1940; Seattle Garfield Messenger 1940a; Seattle Post-Intelligencer 1940; Seattle Times 1940).

5 June 1940. Seattle, Washington, Cornish Theatre. Performed with Syvilla Fort: Bacchanale; Spiritual; improvised three jazz interludes (Dunn 1962, 16).

July 1940. Oakland, California. Composed Fads and Fancies in the Academy.

2 July 1940. Drafted list of percussion instruments he owned.

Summer 1940. Oakland, California, Mills College, Dance Department, Summer Session. Taught courses on dance accompaniment using percussion.

18 July 1940. Oakland, California, Mills College, Lisser Hall. In concert given with Lou Harrison and William Russell, performed Second Construction with Xenia Cage, Doris Dennison and Margaret Jansen; presumably also participated in performances of music by José Ardevol, Suite (first performance); Henry Cowell, Pulse; Lou Harrison, Canticle (first performance); Amadeo Roldán, Ritmicas V and VI; William Russell, Chicago Sketches (first performance) (Cowell, H. 1940; Dunn 1962, 38; Stevenson, Robert 1982, 17; Time 1940).

27 July 1940. Oakland, California, Mills College. First performance of Fads and Fancies at the Academy (performers unknown); choreography Marian Van Tuyl.

Fall 1940. Remained at Mills College in order to establish a research laboratory of percussion and electrical instruments (Los Angeles Times 1940; Williams, B.M. 1990, 225; Yates 1941).

7 October 1940. Los Angeles, California, Richard Bühlig’s home. Organized a private concert of recordings of percussion music, on which occasion he made the acquaintance of Peter Yates (Yates 1967, 304).

After 7 October 1940. San Francisco, California. Composed Living Room Music.

1941. Composed Dance to the West.

March-April 1941. San Francisco, California. Composed Third Construction.

April 1941. San Francisco, California. Composed Double Music with Lou Harrison.

14 May 1941. San Francisco, California, California Club Auditorium (1750 Clay Street). Performed with Xenia Cage, Doris Dennison, Elizabeth Hall, Lou Harrison, Margaret Jansen, and Brabazon Lindsey: Quartet (with Xenia Cage, Dennison, Jansen); Third Construction (conductor; Xenia Cage, Dennison, Harrison, Jansen, first performance); Trio (with Xenia Cage, Dennison); Double Music (conductor, first performance); Lou Harrison, Song of Quezecoatl; Canticle; 13th Simfony [sic] (Caen 1941; Dunn 1962, 35, 38, 39; Harrison and Colvig 1974/1987, 71).

20 May 1941. Oakland, California, Mills College. First performance of Dance Music for Elfrid Ide.

June-early August 1941. Mendocino County, California. Taught at a Works Progress Administration Recreation Counselor’s Camp (Kostelanetz 1970d, illustrations 2-3).

June 1941. Met Henry Miller and presumably Anaēs Nin (Bair 1995).

29 June-8 August 1941. Oakland, California, Mills College, Dance Department, Summer Session. Assisting Marian Van Tuyl and with Eleanor Lauer, taught courses on dance accompaniment using percussion (New York Times 1941).

26 July 1941. Oakland, California, Mills College. Conducted Third Construction, performed by Xenia Cage, Doris Dennison, Lou Harrison and Margaret Jansen; presented Imaginary Landscape No. 1 [recording] as music to the dance, Horror Dream, by Marian Van Tuyl; Amadeo Roldán, Ritmicas V and VI (one with dance by Van Tuyl); Mildred Couper, Dirge and Rumba; Lou Harrison, 13th Simfony [sic]; William Russell, Three Dance Movements (Dunn 1962, 36, 39).

September 1941-May 1942. Invited by László Moholy-Nagy, Cage moved to Chicago to teach a class, “Sound Experiments,” at the School of Design [Institute of Design?] as faculty member (Gillespie 1998, 50; Provines 1941a; Provines 1941b; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 37).

18 November 1941 (evening). Chicago, Illinois, School of Design (247 East Ontario Street). In shared program of presentations of activities, conducted an improvisation with his Class in Sound Experiments.

7 December 1941. Attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii by the Japanese. The United States declared war on Japan, Germany, and Italy. Cage was exempt from military service since he was doing library research work in connection with his father’s top secret work for the government. His parents had moved to Upper Montclair, New Jersey in connection with the job, living first at 393 Grove Street, later at 260 Park Street (Cage/Lanza 1971, 327; Kostelanetz 1988b, 10).

Late 1941. Commissioned by Columbia Workshop of WBBM and Columbia Broadcasting System to compose and radio play, which would become The City Wears a Slouch Hat.

Late 1941-late May 1942. Chicago, Illinois. Composed The City Wears a Slouch Hat, on a text by Kenneth Patchen (1911-1972) (La Hay 1942).

1941-1942. Chicago, Illinois, School of Design (Wednesday nights): invited by László Moholy-Nagy, taught class, “Sound Experiments.” Lived at 323 West Cermak Road (Andrews, B. 1942; Moholy-Nagy 1946/1969, 66; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 37).

Circa 1942. Composed Jazz Study and Opening Dance.

1942. Chicago, Illinois. First performance of Dance to the West to Ruth Hatfield’s dance of the same name.

February 1942. Chicago, Illinois. Composed Imaginary Landscape No. 3.

20 February 1942. Minneapolis, Minnesota, Young Women’s Christian Association, Benton Hall, Modern Dance Center. Florence G. Kelty gave first performance of Opening Dance to Gertrude Lippincott, Introduction in the Modern Manner.

March-April 1942 or earlier. Wrote review, “Chavez and the Chicago Drouth.”

1 March 1942. Chicago, Illinois, Arts Club of Chicago, organized by Frederick Stock. In concert preceded by buffet supper, conducted ensemble (Xenia Cage, Dorothy Fisher, Ruth Hatfield, Brabazon Lindsey, Stuart Lloyd, Rachel MacHatton, Katherine Manning, Claire Oppenheim, Marjorie Parkin): First Construction (in Metal) and first performance of Imaginary Landscape No. 3; Lou Harrison, Counterdance in the Spring and Canticle; William Russell, March Suite (School March, Wedding March, Military March, Hunger March, Funeral March) and Three Dance Movements (Waltz, March, Foxtrot); interviewed by Bob Andrews (Andrews, B. 1942; B. and Suhl 1942; Boyden, S. B. 1942; Chicago Daily News 1942a; Chicago Daily News 1942b; Chicago Daily News 1942c; Chicago Daily Tribune 1942; Chicago Sunday Tribune 1942; Dunn 1962, 35, 36; Hollywood Citizen News 1942; New York World-Telegram 1942; Smith, Cecil 1942; Time 1942; Winn 1942a; Winn 1942b; Winn 1942c).

18 March 1942. Chicago, Illinois, University of Chicago, Leon Mandel Assembly Hall, concert for the benefit of the Hyde Park Neighbourhood Club, in program shared with Chicago University Orchestra, Frederick Stock and Charles Buckley conducting, program of Holst, Beethoven, Bach, Saint-Saens and Dvorak, performed with Xenia Cage, Katherine Manning, Brabazon Lindsey, Marjorie Parkin and Stuart Lloyd: Lou Harrison, Canticle and William Russell, Three Dance Movements; interviewed by Pence James (Chicago Daily News 1942d; James, P. 1942).

April 1942. Chicago, Illinois. Composed Imaginary Landscape No. 2.

7 May 1942. San Francisco, California, Fairmont Hotel, Holloway Playhouse: Harold Bellach, Lena Bellach, William Brown, Doris Dennison, Margaret Jansen, percussion, Lou Harrison, conductor, gave first performances of Imaginary Landscape No. 2 (presented as Fourth Construction), Johanna M. Beyer, Two Movements, Lou Harrison, Canticle No. 3 and In Praise of Johnny Appleseed (the latter as ballet performance, choreographed by Carol Beals and Bodil Genkel, with the Modern Ballet Theater, Carol Beals, William Brown, Bodil Genkel, Joseph Rivette, Irma Wallenius), and performed Henry Cowell, Return; it is uncertain whether Cage was in attendance (Dunn 1962, 37; Fisher, M.M. 1942; Frankenstein 1942).

31 May 1942. Chicago, Illinois, WBBM-CBS, Columbia Workshop. First broadcast of The City Wears a Slouch Hat, performed [live?] by Cilia Amidon, Xenia Cage, Ruth Hartman, Stuart Lloyd and Claire Oppenheim (La Hay 1942).

Early June 1942. Moved to New York with Xenia Cage. They first stayed with Max Ernst (who at the time had an affair with painter Dorothea Tanning) and Peggy Guggenheim; later with dancer Jean Erdman and her husband Joseph Campbell (who at the time wrote A Skeleton Key to Finnegans Wake) at Waverley Place. Through Erdman, met Cunningham again. Among the artists who made the acquaintance of Cage and Xenia in New York was Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968). Duchamp turned over the making of La boĒte-en-valise (1936-1941) to Xenia Cage, who became the fabricator of approximate sixty boxes. Cage also met André Breton, Gypsy Rose Lee, Piet Mondrian, and Edgard VarŹse; Cage occasionally replaced Cowell at the New School for Social Research (Bonk 1989; Cage 1960? in Kostelanetz 1970d, 118; Cage 1961h, 12; Cf. Feldman/Gena 1982CHECK; Cage/Dufallo 1989; Cage/Jouffroy and Cordier 1974; Cage/Raymond and Roberts 1980, 8; Cage/Roth and Roth 1973; Guggenheim 1979; Herzogenrath 1979: also met Josef Albers?]; Larsen and Larsen 1991; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 37).

Early June 1942 (or later)-1943. New York. Taught at the Franziska Boas School (New York Herald Tribune 1943).

July 1942. New York. Composed Credo in Us.

1 August 1942. Bennington, Vermont, Bennington College. Unidentified performers gave first performance of Credo in Us [original version], as music to the dance drama by Merce Cunningham (Shadow) and Jean Erdman (Ghoul’s Rage), including a text by Cunningham; presumably also performed music by Carlos Chavez (Dunn 1962, 35; Jowitt 1992).

8-9 August 1942. Colorado Springs.

October 1942. New York. Revised Credo in Us.

20 October 1942. New York, Studio Theatre (106 West 16th Street): first performance of Credo in Us (revised version), as music to the dance drama, Credo in Us, by Merce Cunningham (Dunn 1962, 35).

Prior to 20 October 1942. New York. Composed Forever and Sunsmell and Totem Ancestor.

20-21 October 1942. New York, Studio Theatre, presented by the Dance Observer. In program shared by Jean Erdman, Nina Fonaroff, and Merce Cunningham, performed Totem Ancestor (first performance, Cunningham); Credo in Us (revised version, Erdman and Cunningham; conducted percussion group consisting of Xenia Cage, Helen Lanfer, David Campbell); Forever and Sunsmell (first performance, with Vivian Bower, mezzo soprano, and Xenia Cage); Ad Lib (music by Gregory Tucker, Erdman and Cunningham, accompanied by Helen Lanfer) (Dunn 1962, 18, 21; G.W.B. 1942).

November 1942. New York. Composed And the Earth Shall Bear Again for the dance by Valerie Bettis (1920-1982), and The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs.

13 November 1942. New York, Steinway Concert Hall. Attended recital by Sylvia Streetor, soprano, accompanied by Irene Grenberg: arietta by Mazzaferrata, arias by Mozart, Puccini, songs by Haydn, Wolf, Strauss, Weckerlin, Widor, Foudrain, Rimsky-Korsakov, Erich J. Wolff, and Gretchaninoff.

13-14 November 1942. Wrote Sylvia Streetor Recitalist (review).

20 November 1942. New York, Carnegie Chamber Hall. Attended concert by the Welsh Women’s Chorus, conducted by Llewellyn Roberts, with traditional airs of the British Isles; Mary Elizabeth Davies, harpist and assisting soloist, performed music by Verdalle, Tournier, Bierné and a group of arrangements of Welsh songs.

20-21 November 1942. Wrote Welsh Women’s Chorus in 5th Annual Concert (review).

6 December 1942. New York, Dance Theatre of the YMHA (“92nd Street Y”). Gave first performance of And the Earth Shall Bear Again, to Valerie Bettis’s dance; joint dance recital with Erick Hawkins and Sybil Shearer (Martin, J. 1942).

Late 1942-1943. New York. Composed Four Dances, completing the first 7 December 1942; the second 18 December 1942; the third 19 December 1942; and the fourth 3 January 1943.

24 December 1942. New York. Completed Primitive.

26 December 1942. New York. Completed In the Name of the Holocaust.

Late 1942. Composed Shimmera.

Presumably late 1942 or early 1943. New York. Composed A Chant with Claps.

1943. New York. Composed Our Spring Will Come, A Room and She Is Asleep.

January-February 1943. New York. Composed Amores.

16 January 1943. New York, Central High School of Needle Trades (225 West 24th Street), Students’ Dance Recitals. During dance recital of Hanya Holm and Company, first performance (unknown performers with Paul Aron, piano, and Vivian Bower, voice) of Four Dances to A Suite of Four Dances by Hanya Holm (J.B. 1943).

20-22 January 1943. New York, Studio Theatre (evenings), presented by Dance Observer. In shared dance recital with Lee Sherman and Beatrice Seckler, Marie Marchowsky and Group, and Welland Lathrop and Group, Florence Weber gave first performances of Lidice to Marie Marchowsky’s There Will Be Tomorrow (G.W.B. 1943).

7 February 1943. New York, Museum of Modern Art (11 West 53rd Street), Auditorium, presented in association with the League of Composers. Gave first performance of Amores with Xenia Cage and Merce Cunningham; also conducted ensemble consisting of Mary Anthony, Xenia Cage, David Campbell, Jean Campbell, Arthur Christie, Merce Cunningham, Renata Garve, Molly Howe, Cecil Kitcat, Helen Lanfer, Edward McLean, Joan Palmer; Ruth Stuber Jeanne, marimba; performances of First Construction (in Metal) and Imaginary Landscape No. 3, as well as works by Lou Harrison, Counterdance in the Spring and Canticle; Henry Cowell, Ostinato Pianissimo (premiere); Jose Ardévol, Preludio a 11 (premiere); and Amadeo Roldán, Ritmicas V and VI; interviewed by Time; during rehearsals for this concert renewed the acquaintanceship with Virgil Thomson (Bagar 1943; Bowles 1943b; Brooklyn Eagle 1943; Dunn 1962, 33, 35, 36; Fuller, D. 1943; H. S. 1943; Kostelanetz 1970d, illustrations 6-16; Life 1943; Montclair Times 1943; New 1943a; Reis 1942; Straus 1943b; Thompson, O. 1943a; Thompson, O. 1943b; Time 1943).

Prior to 14 February 1943. Composed Ad Lib.

14 February 1943. Chicago, Illinois, Arts Club of Chicago. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Jean Erdman: first performances of Ad Lib, In the Name of the Holocaust, Shimmera; performed Credo in Us, with Xenia Cage, Gretchen Schoeninger and Stuart Lloyd, Totem Ancestor, and, with Edna May Charles (contralto) and Xenia Cage, Forever and Sunsmell (Dunn 1962, 18, 21, 35; Smith, Cecil 1943).

14 February 1943. New York, YMHA (Lexington Avenue and 92nd Street), Five Dancers, Dance Theatre Series: Iris Mabry dances to music by Cage and others: Bitter Cycle.

5 March 1943. New York, Carnegie Chamber Music Hall. Janet Fairbank, soprano; Carl [or Karl] Kritz, piano, gave first performance of The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs and performances of music by Ernest Bacon, Paul Bowles, Theodore Chanler, Paul Creston, David Diamond, Mary Howe, Harry K. Lamont, Charles Naginski, John Sacco, Virgil Thomson, David Van Vactor, and Béla Wilda (Berger, A.V. 1943, 256; Bohm 1943; Dunn 1962, 22 [error]; Mills, C. 1944, 191; Musical America 1943; Musical Courier 1943; New York World-Telegram 1943; Straus 1943a).

14 March 1943 (afternoon). New York, New York Public Library, Room 213, League of Composers. Performed with Janet Fairbank: The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs in program with music by Elliott Carter, Vincent Persichetti, Beatrice Laufer, Lukas Foss, Van Vactor, Wilda, Bacon, Bricker, Leonard Bernstein (Bowles 1943a).

July 1943. Amores published by Henry Cowell’s “New Music” series, constituting Cage’s first published composition (Thomson 1947a).

Presumably late 1943. Chicago, Illinois. Composed Triple-Paced (First Version).

Winter 1943-1944. New York. Composed The Perilous Night.

1944. New York. Composed Prelude for Meditation and The Unavailable Memory of.

8 March 1944 (evening). New York, Y.M.H.A (Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street), Kaufman Lounge. Participated in first of a series of Panels on the Dance, “Composers and the Dance,” with Norman Lloyd, Bernardo Segall, and Paul Nordoff, chaired by Louis Horst.

Prior to 5 April 1944. New York. Composed Root of an Unfocus and Spontaneous Earth, and Triple-Paced (Second Version).

5 April 1944 (evening). New York, Studio Theatre (108 West 16th Street, former Humphrey-Weidman Theatre). Performed with Juanita Hall (mezzo soprano), Robert Fizdale, Karl Kritz, and Stanley Lock (percussion) and Merce Cunningham (first recital jointly given by Cage and Cunningham, the latter’s debut solo recital): Meditation to Tossed As It Is Untroubled (first performance), Root of an Unfocus (first performance), Spontaneous Earth (first performance), Totem Ancestor, Triple-Paced (Second Version) to Triple-Paced (possibly first performance), The Unavailable Memory of (first performance); also concert performances of Amores (with Fizdale, Kritz, Lock), The Perilous Night (first performance), Duet from She Is Asleep (with Hall, first performance), and The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs (with Hall) (Beiswanger 1944; Cunningham 1982a, 173-174; Denby 1944; Dunn 1962, 16, 17, 21, 22; Harrison, L. 1944; Sabin 1944; Tomkins 1965, 97).

23 April 1944. New York, 92d Street Y. Sarah Malament (piano) and Langston Hughes (recitation of his poem) performed Our Spring Will Come (presumably first performance) to Pearl Primus’s identically titled dance.

May-August 1944. New York. Composed A Book of Music, written for Robert Fizdale (1920-1995) and Arthur Gold (1917-1990). With Three Dances, it was the first commission Cage received from professional performers.

16 June 1944. Signed a contract with the American Composers Alliance.

Summer 1944. Port Jefferson, New York. Appeared briefly in Maya Deren (Eleanora Derenkowsky, 1917-1961), At Land [films] (Clark, V.A., Hodson, and Neiman 1988).

July 1944. New York. Completed A Valentine out of Season.

22 August 1944 or earlier. New York. Composed Four Walls.

22 August 1944. Steamboat Springs, Colorado, Perry Mansfield Theatre, Perry Mansfield Dance Camp. Unidentified pianist and singer gave first performance of Four Walls, music to a dance play by Merce Cunningham (Cunningham 1982a, 174-175).

November-December 1944 or earlier. New York: wrote review, Summer Music: The Parks.

November 1944 or earlier. Wrote article, “Grace and Clarity.”

Prior to 20 November 1944. New York. Arranged first movement of Erik Satie, Socrate for piano.

20 November 1944 (afternoon). Richmond, Virginia, Women’s Club. Performed with Merce Cunningham: Erik Satie, Socrate [arrangement of first movement by Cage, presumably for piano solo] to Idyllic Song (first performance), Root of an Unfocus, Spontaneous Earth, Totem Ancestor, Tossed As It Is Untroubled (Quinn 1944).

December 1944. New York. Composed Three Dances.

Prior to 12 December 1944 (late 1943?). New York. Composed Chess Pieces (music).

Prior to 12 December 1944 (late 1943?). New York. Made Chess Piece (artwork).

12 December 1944. New York, Julian Levy Gallery (47 East 57th Street). Vernissage of group exhibition, “The Imagery of Chess” (Marcel Duchamp and Max Ernst), to which Cage contributed both Chess Pieces (artwork) and Chess Pieces (music).

Circa 1944-1945. New York. With Henry Cowell, Lou Harrison, and Virgil Thomson composed Party Pieces.

1944-1945. New York. Composed Mysterious Adventure and Soliloquy.

1945. New York. Cage and Xenia separated and shortly afterwards divorced. Moved to 550 Hudson Street (around June, then still with Xenia), then to Sutton Place, then to 134 [or 326?] Monroe Street at Grand Street. Cage’s supposed sexual reorientation in these years seems doubtful in light of what appears to be a rather consistent pattern of bisexual behavior throughout his life, although from these years on he established a lifelong personal and artistic relationship with choreographer Merce Cunningham (Glamour 1945; Lederman 1982/1982, 152-153).

1945 or earlier. Composed Thin Cry (choreography Yuriko).

1945. New York. Thin Cry (choreography Yuriko) first performed.

9 January 1945 (evening). New York, Hunter College, Hunter Playhouse (68th Street between Park and Lexington Avenues). Performed with Maro Ajemian and Merce Cunningham: Experiences No. 1 (first performance); Meditation; Mysterious Adventure (first performance); Root of an Unfocus; Soliloquy (solo from Four Walls, first performance); Spontaneous Earth; Tossed As It Is Untroubled; Totem Ancestor; Triple-Paced; The Unavailable Memory of; Erik Satie, Socrate, first movement (arrangement for two pianos by Cage) to Idyllic Song (Barlow, S.L.M. 1945; Dunn 1962, 11, 16 [error], 17, 18).

21 January 1945 (afternoon). New York, New School for Social Research (66 West 12th Street), Auditorium. Robert Fizdale and Arthur Gold made their New York debut with first performances of A Book of Music and of the original version of Three Dances; Cage performed The Perilous Night and was interviewed by Frank Vreeland (Cage 1973d; Dunn 1962, 17, 19, 20; Harrison, L. 1945; Thomson 1945; Vreeland 1945).

Prior to 4 February 1945. New York. Composed Daughters of the Lonesome Isle.

4 February 1945. New York, 92d Street Y. Gave first performance (presumably) of Daughters of the Lonesome Isle.

Presumably prior to 29 April 1945. Composed The Feast.

29 April 1945. New York, YMHA, Theresa L. Kaufmann auditorium. First performance (presumably) of The Feast.

19 May 1945. New York, National Theatre, presented by Martha Graham. In program shared with Charles Mills and Erick Hawkins, performed with Merce Cunningham: Mysterious Adventure (Carter 1946; Dunn 1962, 17).

October 1945. New York. Revised and completed Three Dances, begun December 1944 (Cage 1973d).

Before 24 December 1945. Interviewed by Kurt List (List 1945).

Prior to 27 December 1945. Composed Ophelia.

27 December 1945. New York, New York Times Hall. Performed with Jean Erdman: first performance of Ophelia.

28 December 1945. New York, New York Times Hall. Performed with Valerie Bettis, Pearl Primus: Daughters of the Lonesome Isle; Forever and Sunsmell.

Between 1946-1956. Participated in Composers Forum (Downes 1956).

Circa 1946. New York: consulted psychoanalyst (Cage/Raymond and Roberts 1980, 8).

Circa 1946. New York. Moved to 326 Monroe Street (Harper’s Bazaar 1952).

February 1946-March 1948. New York. Composed Sonatas and Interludes. Cage’s sources for his reception of rasa theory were Ananda K. Coomaraswamy, The Dance of Shiva: Essays on Indian Art and Culture (London: Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent, and Co., 1924) and Coomaraswamy, The Transformation of Nature in Art (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1934).

15 February 1946. New York, Town Hall. Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale performed first of Three Dances (pianos prepared by Cage) in recital with music by Johann Christian Bach, Paul Bowles, Alexei Haieff, Vittorio Rieti, Erik Satie, Igor Stravinsky, and Virgil Thomson (Dunn 1962, 20; Taubman 1946; Thomson 1946d).

27 February 1946. Bronxville, New York, Sarah Lawrence College. Performed with Jean Erdman: Daughters of the Lonesome Isle, and Ophelia to Ophelia (Erdman); and with Xenia Cage (percussion) and Vivian Bower (mezzo soprano) performed Forever and Sunsmell (Dunn 1962, 9, 16, 21).

Prior to March 1946. Interviewed by Doris M. Hering (Hering 1946).

Prior to 24 March 1946. New York. Interviewed for PM’s Sunday Picture News (PM’s Sunday Picture News 1946).

Prior to 5 or 12 April 1946. Composed Foreboding.

5 or 12 April 1946. New York, Times Hall. First performance of Foreboding to Foreboding by Nina Fonaroff (performer unknown).

14 April 1946 (afternoon). New York, Town Hall. Maro Ajemian gave first partial performance of Sonatas and Interludes (Sonatas 1-4), presented as Four Sonatas, in program with music by Ludwig van Beethoven, Robert Schumann, Fryderyk Chopin, Alan Hovhaness, Richard Yardumian, Paul Bowles, and Aram Khatchaturian (Dunn 1962, 18; Straus 1946; Thomson 1946a).

May 1946. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Composed Prelude for Six Instruments in A Minor.

Prior to 12 May 1946. Composed Encounter.

12 May 1946 (evening). New York, Hunter College Playhouse (68th Street between Park and Lexington Avenues). Performed with Maro Ajemian, Merce Cunningham, Katherine Litz, Winkie Bosler, and others in a program of dances: John Krell (flute), Phil Fisher (trumpet in B flat), Fowler Friedlander (bassoon), Cage or Maro Ajemian (piano), Anahid Ajemian (violin), and Margaret Beck (violoncello) performed Prelude for Six Instruments in A Minor (without dance, first performance); performed Encounter (first performance); Experiences No. 1 (with Maro Ajemian) and Livingston Gearhart [sic], Experiences No. 2; The Encounter; Root of an Unfocus; Tossed as it is Untroubled; Totem Ancestor; Baby Dodds, drum improvisation to ‘Fast Blues’; Alexei Haieff, ‘The Princess Zondilda and Her Entourage’ (conducted by Alexei Haieff, with Bosler as the Princess and Litz and Cunningham as courtiers); Alan Hovhaness (1911-2000), Invocation to Vahakn; Erik Satie, Socrate (first movement in an arrangement for two pianos by Cage) to Idyllic Song (Dunn 1962, 11, 16, 17, 18; Terry, W. 1946).

Summer 1946. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 5851 Forbes Street. Residency. Taught, composed, gave lecture recitals; interviewed by Sam Hood prior to 23 June (Hood 1946).

Prior to June 1946. Interviewed by Junior Harper’s Bazaar (Junior Harper’s Bazaar 1946).

16 June 1946. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Performed with Merce Cunningham.

25 June 1946. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh Playhouse (222 Craft Avenue), presented by Genevieve Jones. Performed with Henry Mazer and Merce Cunningham: Tossed as it is Untroubled, Root of an Unfocus, Spontaneous Earth, Totem Ancestor, Triple-Paced, The Unavailable Memory of, Erik Satie, Socrate (first movement) to Idyllic Song, Livingston Geerhaert, Experiences, and Alan Hovhannes, Invocation to Vahakn (Dunn 1962, 11 [error], 16, 17, 18; Lissfelt 1946).

July 1946. Composed first of Two Pieces for Piano (1946).

May-August 1946. Composed second of Two Pieces for Piano (1946).

August-December 1946. New York. Cage and Geeta [Gita] Sarabhai [not to be confused with Gira, her sister] (1922-2011), an Indian musician, exchanged their respective knowledge of Western and Indian music and aesthetics. Sarabhai’s farewell present to Cage was an English translation of Mahendranath Gupta, The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna (New York: Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center, 1942); Cage also read Aldous Huxley, The Perennial Philosophy (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1945), and Carl Jung, The Integration of the Personality, trans. Stanley M. Dell (London: Kegan Paul, Trency, Trubner, 1940) at the time (Cage 1970e; 91c; Cage/Boenders 1980, 210; Patterson, D.W. 1996, 112; Tomkins 1965, 98-99).

7-8 December 1946 (evenings). New York, Studio Theatre (108 West 16th Street). In dance program of Jean Erdman, assisted by Natanya Neumann and Elizabeth Sherbon, Raymond Sachse (piano), Adrienne Auerswald (singer), Merton Brown (percussion) performed Forever and Sunsmell, Daughters of the Lonesome Isle, and Ophelia.

10-11 December 1946. New York, Carnegie Chamber Music Hall. Maro Ajemian and William Masselos gave first performances of Three Dances (revised version) and performed A Book of Music; Ajemian performed from Sonatas and Interludes, presented as Four Sonatas (Bloom 1947, 128-129; Dearborn 1946; Dunn 1962, 18, 19, 20; Finkelstein 1947; Goldstein, S. 1947; Hague 1946; Harrison, L. 1946; Montclair Times 1946; Parmenter 1946; Simon, R.A. 1946).

14-15 December 1946 (evenings). New York, Studio Theatre (108 West 16th Street). In dance program of Nina Fonaroff and Company, Louis Horst, Ralph Gilbert or Ernest Lubin performed The Feast.

1947. New York. Composed Music for Marcel Duchamp.

1947. Lou Harrison suffered a nervous breakdown and was hospitalized. Cage requested Charles Ives to help with the hospital expenses (Ives 1987).

January 1947. Due to rising production costs, the periodical, Modern Music, discontinued publication (Downes 1947).

January-April. New York. Composed The Seasons.

February 1947. New York. Completed piano reduction of The Seasons.

15 February 1947 (4:30-4:55 pm). New York, WNYC, American Music Festival. Broadcast of music by John Cage performed by Maro Ajemian.

15 April 1947. Corvallis, Oregon, Corvallis High School, Auditorium, organized by Oregon State College. Dorris Dennison, piano, performed with the Van Tuyl-Lauer Dance Group: Paul Hindemith, Erik Satie, Henry Cowell, and Cage [unknown composition]; program repeated at the University of Oregon; Reed College; University of Washington; Western Washington College at Bellingham; Seattle, Washington (20 April); lecture-demonstration at the Pre-Convention Dance Conference, in connection with the Annual Convention of the American Association of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (Thompson, B.L. 1947).

20 April 1947. New York, New School for Social Research (66 West 12th Street), Music of Today, presented by New Music Society. In shared program with Edgard VarŹse conducting Choral Group, Maro Ajemian and William Masselos, pianos, and Percussion Group consisting of Josephine Cnare, Pompy Dobson, Daniel Epstein, Albertt Mockler, and Mimi Wallner, Radiana Pazmor (contralto) and Ernest Lubin (piano) performed The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs and “Duet” from She Is Asleep; music by Alban Berg, [?] Brown, Hovhaness, Lubin, Powers, Ruggles, VarŹse, Webern, Wigglesworth (first performances, Berg and Webern first New York performances), Apostel, Bartók, Cage, Kerr, Luening (Bloom 1947, 332 [error]; Dunn 1962, 21, 22; Thomson 1947c).

Prior to 18 May 1947. Wrote [Untitled], program note on The Seasons.

18 May 1947 (evening). New York, Ziegfield Theatre. In program shared with dances by Lew Christensen and John Taras, Ballet Society Orchestra, Leon Barzin, conductor, gave first performance of The Seasons, to Merce Cunningham’s The Seasons; decors and scenery by Isamu Noguchi (Berger, A.V. 1947; Dunn 1962, 33 [error]; Terry, W. 1947; Thomson 1948).

25 May 1947. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Outlines (230 Oliver Avenue). Arranged lecture-concert, lectured on “modern chromatic music”; William Masselos performed Merton Brown, Cantabile; Lou Harrison, Trio for Keyboard; Ben Weber, Three Pieces; Sara Marie Gugalo, Eugene Eicher, Eugene Phillips performed Anton Webern, String Trio, Opus 20; Masselos performed Anton Webern, Variationen, Opus 27; Arnold Schoenberg, Sechs kleine Klavierstücke, Op. 19; Carl Ruggles, Four Evocations.

4-5 July 1947. Becket, Massachusetts, Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival. Presumably accompanpied Valerie Bettis (guest artist to the Ballet Repertory Company): And the Earth Shall Bear Again (4 July, matinee; 5 July, matinee and evening) (Martin, J. 1947a).

18 September 1947 (Thursday afternoons). New York, Matty Haim’s Studio, A School of the Dance for Nurturing Creative Work and Creative Thinking (411 Fourth Avenue). Began conducting introductory course, “Dance in Relation to Music.”

Prior to 23 October 1947. Composed Nocturne.

23 October 1947 (evening). New York, Town Hall (113-123 West 43rd Street). Anahid Ajemian, violin (Maro Ajemian’s sister) and Philip Fradkin, piano [replacing the announced Eleanor Gough] gave first performance of Nocturne (announced as Duet) in shared program with music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Alan Hovhaness, Wallingford Riegger, Camille Saint-SaĎns, Erik Satie, William Walton, and Anton Webern (Bohm 1947a; C.H. 1947; Dunn 1962, 23; Patterson, D.W. 1996, 294).

Prior to 22 November 1947. Wrote [Untitled], program note for a piano recital by William Masselos.

14 December 1947 (evening). New York, Hunter College, Hunter Playhouse (68th Street). Performed with Lou Harrison, Merce Cunningham and group: Mysterious Adventure and Root of an Unfocus; Maro Ajemian and William Masselos performed Three Dances to Dromenon (Cunningham with six dancers); Lou Harrison conducted ad hoc ensemble (Roma Ball, flute; Raymond Ojeda, bassoon; Phil Shapiro, trumpet; Anahid Ajemian, violin; Nellis Delay, violoncello; Maro Ajemian, piano) in Alexei Haieff, The Princess Zondilda and Her Entourage (music by Alexei Haieff, Cunningham with two dancers) and The Open Road (music Harrison) (Dunn 1962, 17, 20).

Winter 1947-1948. New York. With Robert Motherwell (1915-1991), Pierre Chareau (1883-1950), and Harold Rosenberg (1906-1978), edited art and literary magazine, Possibilities, through its one-issue life (Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 38; Rossum 1988, 36).

1948. William Masselos recorded Music for Marcel Duchamp for the film Dreams That Money Can Buy by Hans Richter (A. D. 1949; Applebaum 1948; Dunn 1962, 16).

24 January 1948 (evening). New York, Columbia University, McMillin Theater (Broadway and 116th Street), Fourth Composers’ Forum. In program shared with Jacob Avshalomoff, Maro Ajemian performed eight sonatas and four interludes from Sonatas and Interludes, followed by discussion with the audience, moderated by Virgil Thomson (Berger, A.V. 1948; New York Herald Tribune 1948).

27-29 February 1948. Poughkeepsie, New York, Vassar College, National Inter-Collegiate Arts Conference, The Creative Arts in Contemporary Society. Attended; at Art and Music Panel, shared with painter Ben Shahn, gave address, A Composer’s Confessions (28 February, afternoon, Ely Hall, Aula), followed by student discussion group (Students’ Building, Old Council Room); Merce Cunningham gave address at Dance-Drama Panel (28 February, morning, Ely Hall, Aula); summary and discussion (29 February, morning, Ely Hall, Aula) (Cage 1991c; DeCamp 1948; Thorsch 1948).

22 March 1948. New York, City Center, presented by Ballet Society. In shared program with choreographies by Todd Bolender (music by Samuel Barber) and George Balanchine (music by Georges Bizet) and music by Arthur Berger, The Seasons (orchestra) to Merce Cunningham, The Seasons performed (Leon Barzin, musical director); production repeated from previous season (Dunn 1962, 33, 54; Frankenstein 1948; Martin, J. 1947b; Terry, W. 1948).

Prior to 25 March 1948. Interviewed by Montclair Times (Montclair Times 1948).

3-8 April 1948. Black Mountain, North Carolina, Black Mountain College (Joseph Albers, director of art Department). First visit; performed music to dances by Merce Cunningham; gave first complete performance of Sonatas and Interludes (6 April) (Duberman 1972; Dunn 1962, 18; Vaughan 1997, 46).

Prior to 21 April 1948. New York. Composed Experiences No. 2.

April 1948. Los Angeles, California, Evenings on the Roof. Performed Sonatas and Interludes (Yates 1948).

21 April 1948. Los Angeles, California, University of California, Pacific Coast Dance Festival, presented by the Committee on Drama, Lectures, and Music and the Department of Physical Education. Performed with Merce Cunningham: Experiences No. 2 (presumably first performance, vocalized), Mysterious Adventure, Root of an Unfocus, Tossed as It Is Untroubled, Totem Ancestor; Lou Harrison, The Open Road; Alan Hovhaness, Invocation to Vahakn; Erik Satie, first movement of Socrate (arranged for solo piano [sic]) to Idyllic Song (Vaughan 1997, 286).

23 April 1948. Claremont, California, Pomona College. Performed with Merce Cunningham (six dances); also performed part of Sonatas and Interludes.

Presumably prior to 7 May 1948. New York. Composed Dream.

7-9 May 1948. Columbia, Missouri, Stephens College, New Arts Week End. Visited with Maya Deren, Merce Cunningham; four films by Deren shown: At Land, Meshes in the Afternoon, A Study in Choreography, Ritual in Transfigured Time (7 May, evening, Auditorium); performed Sonatas and Interludes (8 May, afternoon, Auditorium); performed with Merce Cunningham; gave first performance of Dream to Dream (8 May, evening, Auditorium) [according to M.E. Harris 1987 the original music for Dream was not by Cage; Vaughan 1997 contradicts this]; “The Experimental Arts in Contemporary Society,” lecture by John Malcolm Brinnin, who moderated the weekend as well as the concluding discussion (9 May, afternoon, Lela Raney Wood Parlors) (Dunn 1962, 18; Harris, M. E. 1987, 156; Stephens Life 1948; Vaughan 1997, 46).

1 July-25 August 1948. Black Mountain, North Carolina, Black Mountain College. Second visit; taught, performed, and organized a twenty-five concert festival devoted to the music of Erik Satie, including a performance of his play, Le piŹge de Méduse (The Ruse of Medusa, 1913); performed the “toutes petites danses” as “Monkey Dances,” choreographed and danced by Merce Cunningham, on ‘prepared’ piano, following Satie’s practice (Orledge 1990b, 298); cast included Richard Buckminster Fuller (1895-1983) and Elaine de Kooning (14 August) (Cage had made the acquaintance with Buckminster Fuller and Willem and Elaine de Kooning here; also with Arthur Penn and Richard and Louise Lippold); gave various short introductions to Satie’s music; with his lecture, Defense of Satie, he caused controversy (Cage 1970b; Cage 1979c, 96-97; Cage/Kostelanetz 1968[WE]/1970, 24; Duberman 1972; Fitton 1951; Harris, M. E. 1987; Kostelanetz 1970d, 77n; Sieden 1990, 309-312; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 38).

August 1948. Black Mountain, North Carolina. Composed In a Landscape, Orestes and Suite for Toy Piano.

20 August 1948. Black Mountain, North Carolina, Black Mountain College. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Louise Lippold: gave first performances of In a Landscape to In a Landscape (with Lippold), Orestes, Suite for Toy Piano to A Diversion and Dream; according to Harris, this performance of Dream was the first to use Cage’s music of the same title; Vaughan contradicts this (Dunn 1962, 7, 8, 11; Harris, M.E. 1987, 156; Vaughan 1997, 46).

19 December 1948. New York, Carnegie Recital Hall. Gave first known performance of A Valentine out of Season (Dunn 1962, 19).

22 December 1948. New York, Town Hall. Performed Part I and IV of Amores (Dunn 1962, 33; Sabin 1949).

1949. New York, Artists’ Club: lectured on “Indian Sand Painting or The Picture That Is Valid for One Day” (Sandler 1970, 213).

1949. New York, Hunter College Playhouse: Vivian Bower (mezzo soprano) performed with Merce Cunningham: Experiences No. 2 to Experiences (Dunn 1962, 20).

9 January 1949. New York, Metropolitan Music School. Performed A Valentine out of Season (Dunn 1962, 19).

12-13 January 1949. New York, Carnegie Recital Hall. Maro Ajemian performed Sonatas and Interludes; Cage in attendance; interviewed by Cecil Smith (Berger, A.V. 1949a; Dunn 1962, 18; Gelatt 1949; Parmenter 1949; Smith, Cecil 1949; Time 1949).

14 and 22 January 1949. New York, City Center: New York City Ballet Company, Leon Barzin, musical director, performed The Seasons (orchestra version) to Merce Cunningham, The Seasons; in program with work by Bolender (music by Ravel) and Balanchine (music by Haieff); Cage probably in attendance (Dunn 1962, 33; Time 1949).

23 January 1949 (afternoon and evening). New York, YM & YWHA, Kaufmann Auditorium (Lexington Avenue and 92nd Street). Unidentied musician performed with Valerie Bettis and Company: And the Earth Shall Bear Again as part of dance program.

23 January 1949 (evening). New York, Hunter Playhouse (68th Street, between Park and Lexington Ave.). Raymond Sachse performed with Jean Erdman and Dance Company: Daughters of the Lonesome Isle and Ophelia as part of dance program.

3 February 1949 (afternoon). Winnetka, Illinois, North Shore Country Day School Theatre (310 Green Bay Road), presented by Rondo. Performed with Merce Cunningham: A Diversion; Root of an Unfocus; Tossed As It Is Untroubled; Totem Ancestor; Mysterious Adventure; Dream; Erik Satie, dances from Le piŹge de Méduse to Monkey Dances; and possibly a new dance choreographed by Sybil Shearer (Wilmette Life 1949).

9 February 1949. Portland, Oregon, Reed College, Reed College Concert, Theater-Gymnasium. Performed with Merce Cunningham: part I and IV of Amores and A Valentine out of Season (both without dance), Dream, Mysterious Adventure, Root of an Unfocus, Suite for Toy Piano (piano) to A Diversion, Totem Ancestor, and Erik Satie, dances from Le piŹge de Méduse to Monkey Dances (Dunn 1962, 7, 11, 17, 34).

23 February 1949. Los Angeles, California, Lester Horton Dance Theater (7566 Melrose Avenue), also sponsored by Evenings on the Roof. Introduced and performed Sonatas and Interludes (B. R. N. 1949; Dunn 1962, 18).

24 February 1949. Los Angeles, California, University of California at Los Angeles, Royce Hall, Pacific Coast Dance Festival. Performed with Merce Cunningham: Mysterious Adventure, Root of an Unfocus, Totem Ancestor and unknown pieces (Porter, H.P. 1949).

26 February 1949. San Francisco, California, Marine’s Memorial Theater, presented by the San Francisco Dance League. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Doris Dennison: Dream, Experiences No. 1 (Dennison [not mentioned in program]) to Experiences, Mysterious Adventure, Root of an Unfocus, Suite for Toy Piano (on piano) to A Diversion, and Totem Ancestor; Erik Satie, Le piŹge de Méduse, “Toutes petites danses” to Monkey Dances (Campbell, F. 1949; Dunn 1962, 7, 11, 17, 18).

27 February 1949 (afternoon). Oakland, California, Mills College, Concert Hall. Performed Sonatas and Interludes; previously interviewed by Clifford Gessler (Campbell, F. 1949; Dunn 1962, 18; Gessler 1949).

6 March 1949. New York, Town Hall. Presumably attended concert with music by Alan Hovhaness.

9 March 1949. Poughkeepsie, New York, Vassar College, Students’ Hall. Performed with Merce Cunningham: Dream [presumably replacing Experiences No. 2]; Mysterious Adventure; Orestes; Root of an Unfocus; Totem Ancestor; Erik Satie, “Toutes petites danses” from Le piŹge de Méduse to Monkey Dances; question period (Pauly, H. 1949; Pearson and Grant 1949).

13 March 1949. New Haven, Connecticut, Yale University, Jonathan Edwards College, Common Room. Performed with Merce Cunningham: Dream, Root of an Unfocus, Suite for Toy Piano to A Diversion, Totem Ancestor, and Erik Satie, “Toutes petites danses” from Le piŹge de Méduse to Monkey Dances, as well as the first half from Sonatas and Interludes (Dunn 1962, 7, 11, 17, 18).

20 March 1949. New York. Invited by Burgess Meredith (1907-1997) to compose the soundtrack for the film Works of Calder.

23 March 1949-October 1949. Sailed to Amsterdam with Merce Cunningham. Sojourned in Europe. In April in Paris, made the acquaintance of Pierre Boulez (born 1925), with whom he maintained a lively correspondence until 1954, Serge Nigg (1924-2008), Olivier Messiaen (1908-1992), and painter Ellsworth Kelly (1923); first [heard? saw?***] Boulez’ Second Sonata; continued his studies of Satie. He published Satie’s Vexations, which he found at Henri Sauguet’s private collection, in Contrepoints no. 6 (1949), facing page 8 [repr. in Artnews Annual vol. 27 (1958), 77]; Cunningham gave dance classes in Jacqueline Levant’s studio at the Salle Pleyel; Cage lived in 34 rue St. Louis (Cage 1961h, 270; Cage/Freedman 1976, 6; Campana 1985, 60; Dickinson 1967; Gatti, A. 1949; Kostelanetz 1970d, 17; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 38).

10 April 1949. Received a fellowship grant from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation ($2,400, for the period of 1 November 1949-21 October 1950); used the money for a trip to Europe with Merce Cunningham (Look 1949; New York Times 1949a; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 38).

22-30 April 1949. Palermo and Taormina, 23rd Festival of the International Society for Contemporary Music. Attended and reviewed, praising Marya Freund and an ensemble directed by Pietro Scarpini, piano, in a performance of Arnold Schoenberg, Pierrot lunaire (23 April, Palermo, Villa Igiea); wrote review, “Contemporary Music Festivals Are Held in Italy” (Campana 1985, 60).

4-7 May 1949. Milan, First Congress for Dodecaphonic Music. Attended and wrote review, “Contemporary Music Festivals Are Held in Italy” (Campana 1985, 60).

13 May 1949. Received grant ($1,000) from the National Institute of Arts and Letters for “having extended the boundaries of music[al art] through his work with percussion orchestras and his invention of the prepared piano” (Look 1949; New York Times 1949b; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 38).

14 May 1949. New York, Columbia University, McMillin Academic Theater, Fifth Annual Festival of Contemporary American Music (9-15 May), sponsored by the Alice M. Ditson Fund; concert given in collaboration with the American Academy and the National Institute of Arts and Letters, whose annual concert it was. In program shared with music by Louis Mennini, Igor Stravinsky, and Stefan Wolpe, Maro Ajemian performed from Sonatas and Interludes (Sonatas XIII, XIV, XV, and XVI) (Berger, A.V. 1949b; Dunn 1962, 18; Stuckenschmidt 1979, 208-209).

7 June 1949. Paris, Conservatoire, Salle Gounod, rue de Madrid. Performed from Sonatas and Interludes privately for students of Olivier Messiaen’s class (Boulez/Cage 1990/1993, 5; Cage/Freedman 1976, 6; Campana 1985, 60; Goeyvaerts 1983, 42, 53).

10 June 1949 (late afternoon). Paris, atelier of Jean Hélion (15 avenue de l’Observatoire), organized by Tanagrit Le Clerq and Betty Nichols. Gave recital of dance and music for prepared piano with Merce Cunningham: part I and IV of Amores to Amores and A Valentine out of Season to Effusions avant l’heure (Vaughan 1997, 288).

17 June 1949. Paris, salon of Suzanne Tézenas. Introduced by Pierre Boulez, performed Sonatas and Interludes and Bacchanale (Boulez/Cage 1990/1993, 5, 27; Fürst-Heidtmann 1979, 271; Schaeffer 1967, 65).

11 July 1949 (evening). Paris, ThéČtre du Vieux Colombier, Soirée de l’Imprévu, organized by the Club d’Essai de la Radiodiffusion Franćaise. In shared program, performed with Merce Cunningham: part I and IV of Amores to Amores and A Valentine out of Season to Effusions avant l’heure (Boulez/Cage 1990/1993, 5; Dunn 1962, 19; Vaughan 1997, 288).

24 June 1949. Paris, Salle Gaveau. Robert Fitzdale and Arthur Gold presumably performed Three Dances (Boulez/Cage 1990/1993, 32).

August 1949. Paris. Began composition of String Quartet in Four Parts.

Summer. Aix-en-Provence. Reviewed the Festival of Music devoted to Mozart.

Prior to 13 August 1949. Wrote Music in Aix.

20 August 1949. New London, Connecticut, Connecticut College, Palmer Auditorium, American Dance Festival. Valerie Bettis and Company, Bernardo Segall, musical director, presented And the Earth Shall Bear Again.

November or December 1949-January 1950. New York. Composed music for Works of Calder.

4 December 1949. New York: letter to Pierre Boulez (Cage/Boulez 1990, 62-63).

17-18 December 1949. New York, City Center, New York City Dance Theatre, initial season (14-24 December). Valerie Bettis presented And the Earth Shall Bear Again in shared program (17 December); performed with ad hoc orchestra and Merce Cunningham: conducted Erik Satie, “Monkey Dances” from Le piŹge de Méduse (The Ruse of Medusa) to The Monkey Dances, and Satie, “Intermezzo Américaine” from La Diva de l’“Empire” (version for brasserie orchestra [flute, clarinet, bassoon, trumpet, trombone, two percussionists, piano, violin, violoncello, and contrabass]; since the instrumentation is not identical with Satie’s, possibly arranged by Cage) to Two Step in shared program (18 December) (Hering 1949; Terry, W. 1949; Vaughan 1997, 53, 288).

Late 1949. Performed Lecture on Nothing (Rossum 1988X, N).

1950. Pierre Boulez, Piano Sonata No. 2 (1947-1948) published by Philippe Heugel at Cage’s intercession.

1950. New York, Artist’s Club (8th Street). Attended meetings started by Robert Motherwell (Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 38).

1950. New York, Artist’s Club (8th Street). Gave Lecture on Nothing (Cage 1959g, [2]; Cage 1961h, ix; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 38).

15 January 1950 (evening). New York, Hunter College, Hunter Playhouse (68th Street between Park and Lexington Avenues). Performed with Merce Cunningham (and five dancers): part I and IV of Amores to Amores; Dream to Dream; Suite for Toy Piano (piano) to A Diversion; A Valentine out of Season to Games; conducted ad hoc ensemble (Julius Baker, flute; Dave Weber, clarinet; Leonard Sharron, bassoon; Carmine Fornarotto, trumpet; David Uber, trombone; George Gaber and Carroll Bratman, percussion; Broadus Earle, violin; Seymour Barab, violoncello; Jane Batchelder, contrabass; Maro Ajemian, piano) in Erik Satie, La diva de l’“Empire” to Two Step; in Ben Weber, Ballet, Opus 26 to Pool of Darkness (Baker, Earle, Sharron, Fornarotto, Barab, Ajemian); in Erik Satie, Le piŹge de Méduse, “Toutes petites danses” to Monkey Dances (Weber, Fornarotto, Uber, Gaber and Bratman, Earle, Barab, Batchelder); Before Dawn (unaccompanied) (Dunn 1962, 7, 11, 19, 34).

22 January 1950 (evening). New York, Hunter Playhouse (68th Street between Park and Lexington Avenues). In dance program of Jean Erdman and Dance Company, Massimo Bogianckino performed Ophelia to Ophelia (Jean Erdman, solo dance).

26 or 27 January 1950. New York, Carnegie Hall. After a New York Philharmonic Orchestra performance of Anton Webern’s Symphony, Op. 21, Dmitri Mitropoulos conducting, made the acquaintance of Morton Feldman (1926-1987); through him, also met pianist David Tudor (1926-1996) (Cage/Duckworth 1989, 23-24; Campana 1985, 73; Feldman, M. 1963MORTON; Feldman/Beckett 1966; Tomkins 1965, 107-111; Tudor/Schonfield 1972, 24).

After 26 January 1950. New York, Artist’s Club (8th Street). Gave Lecture on Something (Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 38).

February 1950. New York. Completed String Quartet in Four Parts.

2 February 1950. New York, Town Hall. Performed part I and IV of Amores (Dunn 1962, 33).

8 February 1950. New York, Town Hall (113-123 West 43rd Street), Town Hall Short Courses, presented by Juilliard School of Music. Performed part I and IV of Amores, suite from Works of Calder and A Valentine out of Season as guest artist (with Henry Cowell) in Robert Tangeman’s course “Contemporary American Music” (Dunn 1962, 19).

7 March 1950. New York, Carnegie Recital Hall. Maro Ajemian performed Sonatas and Interludes; Cage in attendance (Montclair Times 1950; Perkins 1950; Schonberg 1950).

10 March 1950. Sweet Briar, Virginia, Sweet Briar College, Daisy Williams Gymnasium, Symposium on the Arts (9-12 March). Performed with Merce Cunningham in dance recital with Sweet Briar Dance Groups (evening); Cunningham previously had given dance demonstration (late afternoon).

April 1950. New York. Composed Six Melodies.

April 1950. New York. Through Grete Sultan, made the acquaintance with Christian Wolff (1934), who studied with him for a while (Wolff/Patterson 1994).

26 April 1950. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Plays and Players Auditorium. Performed with Merce Cunningham: Dream, Root of an Unfocus, Suite for Toy Piano (on piano), Totem Ancestor, and A Valentine out of Season, as music to the dances, Games, respectively (Dunn 1962, 7, 11, 17, 18, 19).

1 May 1950. Minneapolis, Minnesota. Ensemble from Northwest Sinfonietta, Henry Denecke, conductor, performed Imaginary Landscape No. 3 (Dunn 1962, 36).

14 May 1950 (afternoon). New York, Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association, Theresa L. Kaufmann Concert Hall, Auditorium (Lexington Avenue and 92nd Street), Dance Theatre Subscription Series 1949-1950. Performed with Merce Cunningham: Root of an Unfocus; Totem Ancestor; Before Dawn (silent); Lou Harrison, The Open Road; Erik Satie, Le piŹge de Méduse, “Toutes petites danses” to Monkey Dances (piano version), in program shared with Valerie Bettis and Company.

June 1950. New York. Composed A Flower.

2 July 1950. Letter to Pierre Boulez (Boulez/Cage 1990, 110).

26 July 1950. Letter to Pierre Boulez (Boulez/Cage 1990, 111-112).

July-August 1950. New York. Composed First Part of Concerto for Prepared Piano and Chamber Orchestra.

12 August 1950. Black Mountain, North Carolina, Black Mountain College. Summer Session String Quartet (Vollmer Hetherington and Robert Brink violins; Eleftherios Eleftherakis, viola; Arthur Fielder, violoncello) gave first performance of String Quartet in Four Parts and performed Ernst Toch, Quartet, Opus 70 (Dunn 1962, 24).

12-13 August 1950. New London, Connecticut, Connecticut College for Women, Palmer Auditorium, American Dance Festival (4-6, 11-13, and 18-20 August). In program shared with Katherine Litz, performed with Merce Cunningham: Root of an Unfocus, Totem Ancestor; Erik Satie, La diva de l’“Empire” to Two Step; Satie, dances from Le piŹge de Méduse to Monkey Dances; and Before Dawn (without music); Tossed as It Is Untroubled (13 August) (Dunn 1962, 16, 17, 18; N. K. 1950).

3 October 1950. New York. Completed Second Part of Concerto for Prepared Piano and Chamber Orchestra.

5 October 1950. New York. Completed first Haiku (1950-1951), “For My Dear Friend, Who.”

Prior to November 1950. New York. Interviewed by House & Garden (House & Garden 1950).

3 November. WNET-TV, Channel 13, Cage, Lippold, Feldman, Ray Johnson.

26 November 1950. New York, Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association (Lexington Avenue at 92 Street), Theresa L. Kaufmann Auditorium, Dance Theatre Subscription Series. Performed with Merce Cunningham, Jean Erdman, and David Tudor: Suite for Toy Piano to A Diversion; A Valentine out of Season to Games; Tossed As It Is Untroubled (Cage and Cunningham); Erik Satie, Ragtime-Parade and Waltz; in program shared with Jean Erdman and Katherine Litz and their companies: Ophelia (Tudor, Erdman); Daughters of the Lonesome Isle (Erdman) (Dunn 1962, 9, 11, 16, 19).

17 December 1950. New York, Carnegie Recital Hall (154 West 57th Street), An Evening of First Performances and Revivals, presented by the League of Composers. In shared program with music by Robert W. Moevs, William Schuman, and Arthur Berger (performed by others), David Tudor performed Pierre Boulez, DeuxiŹme sonate; Cage in attendance; Cage wrote [untitled] program note (Harman, C. 1950; Tudor/Schonfield 1972).

18 December 1950. New York. Letter to Pierre Boulez (Boulez/Cage 1990, 122-125).

1950-1951. In the course of composing the Concerto for Prepared Piano and Chamber Orchestra and Sixteen Dances, received a copy of the ancient Chinese book of divination I Ching (an English translation published in 1950). Although he had known the book as early as the mid-1930s, owing to the renewed acquaintance Cage “was struck immediately by the possibility of using the I Ching as a means for answering questions that had to do with numbers” (Cage 1988cTOKYO, 7).

Prior to or during 1951. Wrote Unfortunate Comment on Our Musical “Life,” That Everybody’s Interested in [text].

17 January 1951. Millbrook, New York, Bennett Junior College. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (Dorothy Berea, Mili Churchill, Anneliese Widman): Sixteen Dances (piano version) (first performance) to Sixteen Dances for Soloist and Company of 3 (Dunn 1962, 28).

21 January 1951 (evening). New York, Hunter College, Playhouse (East 68th Street between Park and Lexington Avenues). Martin Orenstein, flute; Carmine Fonaratto, trumpet; George Baber, Carroll C. Bratman, Arthur Press, Ronald Gould, percussion; Maro Ajemian, piano; Anahid Ajemian, violin; Seymour Barab, violoncello; Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (Dorothy Berea, Mili Churchill, Anneliese Widman) performed Sixteen Dances to Sixteen Dances for Soloist and Company of 3 (first performance of ensemble version); Cage conducted; costumes and properties by Eleanor De Vito, John Cage, Remy Charlip, and Merce Cunningham; also concert performances of Morton Feldman, Projection 2 and Christian Wolff, Trio; according to announcements, but not in program, Louise Lippold, guest artist, danced Snake (silent) and A Flower; presumably interviewed by Arthur V. Berger (Berger, A.V. 1951b; N.K. 1951b; Terry, W. 1951).

28 January 1951 (evening). New York, Hunter College, Playhouse (68th Street between Park and Lexington Avenues). In dance program of Jean Erdman and Company, Ophelia to Ophelia performed, presumably by Jack Maxin (Jean Erdman, solo dance) (N.K. 1951a).

February 1951. New York. Completed Third Part of Concerto for Prepared Piano and Chamber Orchestra.

28 February 1951. New York, Town Hall (113-123 West 43rd Street), Town Hall Short Courses, presented by Juilliard School of Music. Performed selections from Sixteen Dances (piano reduction) and A Valentine out of Season as guest artist in Robert Tangeman’s course “Contemporary Music” (Dunn 1962, 19).

Spring-December 1951. New York. Composed Music of Changes. The wish not to be impeded by economic considerations during the time-consuming compositional process led Cage to form a company by selling shares in the earnings he would make with the work.

March 1951. New York, Columbia University. Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki (1870-1966) delivered three lectures on Zen Buddhism. Shortly therafter he returned to Japan, not to be appointed by the university until the Spring of 1952 (until 1958). It is unclear whether Cage, who recalled having attended Suzuki’s lectures for at least two years, was in the audience in March. Accounts from fellow auditors verify his attendance at least in the Spring and Fall of 1952 (Patterson, D.W. 1996, 141-144).

March 1951 or later. Since Lecture on Nothing was influenced by Suzuki’s lectures, it must date from March 1951 or later (Cage 1961h, ix).

5 March 1951. New York. Completed second Haiku (1950-1951), “(What Stillness!).”

6 March 1951. New York. Completed third Haiku (1950-1951), “The Green Frog’s Voice.”

8 March 1951. New York. Completed fourth Haiku (1950-1951), “The River Plurabelle.”

13 March 1951. Hartford, Connecticut, Julius Hartt School of Music, Auditorium, Institute of Contemporary American Music, Maxim Schapiro, Chairman, Third Season, Fifth Evening, organized by the Julius Hartt Musical Foundation, Moshe Paranov, Director. Attended as guest composer; performed a selection (five sonatas and one interlude) from Sonatas and Interludes (substituting the first performance of the Concerto for Prepared Piano and Chamber Orchestra performed by Cage with the Hartt Chamber Orchestra, Moshe Paranov, conductor, originally announced), and The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs with Jacquelynne Moody (soprano), substituting Helen Hubbard (contralto); Hartt Quartet: Bela Urban and William Hilligan, substituting Margaret Scafarello (violins), Rose Kleman (viola), and Dorothy Fidlar, substituting Seymour Benstock (violoncello) performed String Quartet in Four Parts; lectured on “The Reason for Modern Music” (presumably identical with “Forerunners of Modern Music”), followed by forum; interviewed by Evans Clinchy (Clinchy 1951; Dunn 1962, 22, 24; Pritchett 1988a, 35-36).

16 March 1951. New York. Completed fifth Haiku (1950-1951).

Presumably after 16 March 1951. New York. Completed sixth Haiku (1950-1951).

31 March 1951. New York, Columbia University, McMillin Theater (Broadway at 116th Street). New Music String Quartet (Broadus Erle, Matthew Raimondi, violins; Walter Trampler, viola; Claus Adam, violoncello) performed String Quartet in Four Parts as well as music by Wallingford Riegger and Alban Berg (A.B. 1951; Dunn 1962, 24; Glanville-Hicks 1951).

5 April 1951. Montclair, New Jersey. Montclair Public Library broadcast ten-minute radio interview on WVNJ-620, on which Cage appeared, with Ilda B. Emetaz and Ernest Stevens, on the subject of “Modern Music” (Montclair Times 1951b).

5-27 April 1951. Traveling from Seattle, Washington, via Berkeley, California; San Francisco, California; Omaha, Nebraska; Mankato, Minnesota; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Madison, Wisconsin; Chicago, Illinois; Ithaca, New York, composed Imaginary Landscape No. 4.

7 April 1951 (afternoon). Manhattan, Kansas, Kansas State College, Nichols Gymnasium. Performed with Merce Cunningham (Smith, Mary L. 1951).

8 April 1951 (afternoon). Denver, Colorado, Woman’s Club Auditorium, presented by Allied Artists. Performed Sonatas and Interludes (Denver Post 1951; Patterson, D.W. 1996, 321; Young, A. 1951).

8 or 9 April 1951. Denver, Colorado. Made the acquaintance of Earle Brown and Carolyn Brown (Henahan 1970a; Cage/Duckworth 1989, 23; Patterson 1996, 321; Revill 1992, 139).

9 April 1951 (evening). Denver, Colorado, Jane McLean’s Studio (220 Broadway). Accompanied Merce Cunningham, master class in modern dance (Denver Post 1951; Patterson, D.W. 1996, 321).

12 April 1951. Seattle, Washington, University of Washington, Meany Hall, University of Washington Concerts. Performed with Merce Cunningham: Root of an Unfocus, suite from Sixteen Dances (no. 3, 5, 9, 11, 16); Totem Ancestor; Morton Feldman, Variations, presented as Varation (first performance); Erik Satie, La diva de l’“Empire” to Two Step; dances from Le piŹge de Méduse to Monkey Dances; Je te veux to Waltz.

20 April 1951. San Francisco, Girls High School. Performed with Cunningham.

28 April 1951. City unknown, University Theater. Performed with Cunningham.

1 May 1951 (evening). Saint Paul, Minnesota, St. Catherine’s College, Jeanne d’Arc Auditorium, presented by the Women’s Association of Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra. Henry Denecke and the Northwest Sinfonietta performed Imaginary Landscape No. 3 in program with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Guillaume Du Fay, Marcel Mirouze, Peggy Glanville-Hicks, and J. Guy Ropartz (Harvey, John H. 1951).

10 May 1951. New York, Columbia University, McMillin Theater, presented by New Music Society. Conducted first performance of Imaginary Landscape No. 4 (March No. 2), performed by unidentified ensemble; performed Fuge aus der Geographie by Ernst Toch; program further included music by Charles Ives, William Russell, Ellis Kohs, Virgil Thomson, Peggy Glanville-Hicks, Norman McLaren, Lionel Novak, José Ardevol, Paul Bowles, Lou Harrison, Richard Goldman (Berger, A.V. 1951a; Berger, A.V. 1951c; Cage 1970d; Cowell, H. 1952; Dunn 1962, 36 [error]; Grunfeld 1952; Grunfeld 1960; Grunfeld 1962; Harrison, J.S. 1951; Malina 1984, 163; Sabin 1951; Thomson 1951a).

14 May-2 June 1951. New York, Betty Parsons Gallery. Made the acquaintance of Robert Rauschenberg (1925-2008) at his first solo exhibition, Paintings by Bob Rauschenberg (Hopps and Davidson 1997, 551).

16 May 1951. New York. Completed Music of Changes, Book I.

22 May 1951. Letter to Pierre Boulez (Boulez/Cage 1990, 149-155).

24 May 1951 (evening). Unknown city, Art Gallery (318 Genesee Street), presented by Rameau Society. Albert Bowen performed Sonatas and Interludes in program with Gregorian chants performed by St. Mary’s Church Choir.

25 May 1951 (evening). New York, 39 East 8th Street. New Music Quartet, Frances Magnes (violin), and David Tudor performed music by Pierre Boulez, Cage, and Morton Feldman in private concert.

16 June 1951. New York. Composed third of Seven Haiku.

26 June 1951. Boulder, Colorado, University of Colorado. David Tudor performed music by Igor Stravinsky, Arnold Schoenberg, Béla Bartók, Anton Webern, and Stefan Wolpe (Tudor /Holzaepfel 1994).

July 1951. New York. Composed first of Seven Haiku.

5 July 1951. Boulder, Colorado, University of Colorado. David Tudor gave first performance of Book I of Music of Changes in recital with music by Henry Cowell, Josef Matthias Hauer, Nicolas Roslavetz, Wladimir Woronoff, Pierre Boulez, Morton Feldman (Three Intermissions [presumably 3, 4, and 5]), Christian Wolff (Dunn 1962, 8; Tudor /Holzaepfel 1994).

17 July 1951. Letter to Pierre Boulez (Boulez/Cage 1990, 157).

22 July 1951. Black Mountain, North Carolina, Black Mountain College. Abraham Mishkind (violin) and David Tudor (piano) performed music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven, Claude Debussy, Morton Feldman (Extensions); Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Arnold Schoenberg, Igor Stravinsky.

2 August 1951. New York. Completed Music of Changes, Book II.

19 August 1951 (afternoon). Black Mountain, North Carolina, Black Mountain College. David Tudor performed Music of Changes (Part I) in recital with music by Arnold Schoenberg, Stefan Wolpe, Morton Feldman, Wladimir Woronoff, Christian Wolff, Pierre Boulez, and Anton Webern.

1-3 September 1951. Woodstock, New York, First Art Film Festival in America, sponsored by Woodstock Artists Association, American Federation of Arts, Film Advisory Center. Works of Calder was awarded the prize for the best musical score (Genauer 1951; J.S.B. jr. and P.S. 1951; New York Times 1951; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 38).

September 1951. New York, Columbia University: attended lectures on Zen Buddhism by Dr. Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki, until 1953? [for two [three?] years] (Cage/Bosseur 1981JOHN; Cage/Kostelanetz 1968WE/1970, 23; Kalbacher 1972, 141).

7 October 1951 (afternoon). Princeton, New Jersey, Princeton University, McCosh 50, presented by the Friends of Music at Princeton. Performed Sonatas and Interludes; informal discussion and question period afterwards (Dunn 1962, 18).

18 October 1951. New York. Completed Music of Changes, Book III.

1 November- late December 1951. Montclair, New Jersey. Montclair Public Library broadcast series of ten-minute radio interviews on WVNJ-620, on one of which Cage appeared, with Ilda B. Emetaz and Ernest Stevens, on the subject of “Modern Music” (Montclair Times 1951a; Montclair Times 1952).

9 November 1951. New York. Completed first of Two Pastorales.

14 November 1951. New York, Brooklyn Museum (Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn), Stage for Dancers. In program shared with Lucas Hoving and Pearl Lang, performed with Merce Cunningham and Company: suite (eight movements) from Sixteen Dances to excerpt from Sixteen Dances.

16 November 1951 (evening). New York, Hunter College Auditorium (69th Street, East of Park Avenue). Presentation of awards (by Curt Oertel) in program of prize winning films, including Works of Calder, from the First Art Film Festival in America of 1-3 September 1951.

2 December 1951-27 January 1952. New York, Cherry Lane Theatre (38, Commerce Street), presented by the Living Theatre. Co-sponsored performance of plays by Gertrude Stein, Kenneth Rexroth, and Paul Goodman.

9 December 1951 (evening). New York, Young Women’s & Young Men’s Hebrew Association (Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street), Theresa L. Kaufmann Concert Hall, Dance Concert, presented by Theatre Dance. In shared program, gave first performance of No. 1 of Two Pastorales, to Idyl by Merle Marsicano; according to Dunn 1962, 19, the pianist was David Tudor (Dunn 1962, 19).

13 December 1951. New York. Completed Music of Changes, Book IV.

1951 or 1952. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University. Visited anechoic chamber (Cage 1961h, 8; Cage 1967o, 134; Gann 2010, 160-161, 165; Prochnik 2010).

1 January 1952. New York, Cherry Lane Theatre (38, Commerce Street): David Tudor gave first complete performance of Music of Changes and first performance of Morton Feldman, Intersection 2; performed Pierre Boulez, Sonata No. 2; Christian Wolff, For Prepared Piano (New York premiere) (Ashbery 1971; Dunn 1962, 8; Glanville-Hicks 1952a; Kostelanetz 1970d, illustration 20; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 38; Parmenter 1952b; Thomson 1952a; Tudor /Holzaepfel 1994).

3 January 1952. New York, Jean Erdman’s Studio (77 Fifth Avenue). Lectured on “Music and Dance.”

7 January 1952. New York. Composed Waiting.

12 January 1952. New York. Completed Imaginary Landscape No. 5.

18 January 1952 or earlier. New York, Studio of Bebe Barron and Louis Barrron (9 West 8th Street). Completed realization of Imaginary Landscape no. 5 with David Tudor, with technical assistance of Bebe Barron (1925-2008) and Louis Barron (1920-1989) (Cage/Boulez 1990, 194; Dunn 1962, 37; Straebel 2012).

18 January 1952 (evening). New York, Hunter College, Hunter Playhouse (East 68th Street). Jean Erdman and Company performed with David Tudor (piano) and ensemble conducted by Lou Harrison; first performance of Imaginary Landscape No. 5 (on tape) to Portrait of a Lady (Erdman); music by Alan Hovhaness to Upon Enchanted Ground (Erdman); Morton Feldman, Nature Pieces to Changing Woman (Erdman); music by Claude Debussy to Hamadryad and to Sailor in the Louvre performed; music by Lou Harrison to Io and Prometheus; to The Perilous Chapel; to Changing Moment performed; Tudor performed Daughters of the Lonesome Isle (Dunn 1962, 16, 37; R.E. 1952).

20 January 1952 (evening). New York, Hunter College, Hunter Playhouse (East 68th Street between Park Avenue and Lexington Avenue). Performed with Merce Cunningham, Natanya Neumann, Joan Skinner, and Anneliese Widman: Sixteen Dances [piano reduction] to Sixteen Dances for Soloist and Company of 3; guest artist Louise Lippold danced Snake (without music) and first known performance (accompanied by Cage, presumably singing himself) of A Flower to A Flower (Dunn 1962, 21, 28).

21 January 1952. New York. Composed second of Seven Haiku.

31 January 1952. New York. Completed second of Two Pastorales.

4 February 1952. New York, Henry Street Playhouse. Performed with Louise Lippold: first performance of Waiting (Dunn 1962, 11).

9 February 1952 (afternoon). Chicago, Illinois, Arts Club of Chicago. In solo recital, Maro Ajemian performed Amores (I and IV) (Dunn 1962, 33).

10 February 1952. New York, Cherry Lane Theatre (38, Commerce Street). David Tudor gave first complete performance of Two Pastorales; also performed music by Earle Brown, Henry Cowell, Morton Feldman, Lou Harrison, Josef M. Hauer, Anton Webern, Christian Wolff, Stefan Wolpe, Wladimir Woronoff (A.B. 1952; T. M. S. 1952; Tudor /Holzaepfel 1994).

17 February 1952. New York, Young Women’s & Young Men’s Hebrew Association (Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street). In program shared with Betty Lind and Company, David Tudor accompanied Merle Marsicano (solo dances): first of Two Pastorales to Idyl, as well as music by Stefan Wolpe, Morton Feldman, and Jerry Petersen.

2-4 March 1952. Urbana, Illinois, University of Illinois, Smith Music Hall, Festival of Contemporary Arts. Replacing Peggy Glanville-Hicks, lectured on “contemporary music” (demonstrating the prepared piano) (2 March, afternoon) and moderated or participated in panel discussion, “The Layman Looks at Contemporary Music” (4 March, evening) (Farlow 1953).

Between 3-27 March 1952. Invited by Jacob Druckman, wrote Juilliard Lecture (Cage 1967o, 95n).

Spring 1952. New York. Composed Water Music.

27 March 1952 (afternoon). New York, Juilliard School of Music, Concert Hall (120 Claremont Avenue), International Federation of Music Students 6th Annual Symposium of Contemporary Music (23-29 March). With David Tudor (piano) accompanying, presented Juilliard Lecture (Cage 1967o, 95n).

3 April 1952. New York, Artist’s Club, Where the Arts Meet. Participated in panel, with Frank O’Hara, Herbert Ferber, John Ferren, Ary Stillman (Sandler 1980, 79).

11 April 1952. Richmond, Indiana, Earlham College, Goddard Auditorium. Performed Two Pastorales (Dunn 1962, 19).

22 April 1952. New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music (30 Lafayette Avenue), Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, Theater for Dance, opening program. Presumably performed with Merce Cunningham and Jean Erdman in program shared with Erick Hawkins and Donald McKayle: Erik Satie, La diva de l’“Empire” to Two Step and suite from Sixteen Dances (Cunningham); presented Imaginary Landscape No. 5 to Portrait of a Lady (Erdman) (Dunn 1962, 37).

May 1952-1953. New York, private studio of Louis Barron and Bebe Barron (9 West 8th Street). Initiated a project “for the making of music directly on magnetic tape,” producing several compositions, by Earle Brown, Feldman, Wolff and himself, with technical assistance of David Tudor and Earle Brown and engineers Louis Barron and Bebe Barron, who presumably recorded the sounds used in Williams Mix. Cage’s contributions to the project were Imaginary Landscape No. 5, and Williams Mix, named after its patron, Paul Williams (composed May-October 1952; splicing of tapes May 1952-16 January 1953); other compositions realized were Louis Barron and Bebe Barron, For an Electronic Nervous System No. 1; Earle Brown, Octet I (1953); Morton Feldman, Intersection (1953); Christian Wolff, For Magnetic Tape (1952-1953); the Brown and Feldman compositions were completed at the Rangertone Studios of R. H. Ranger Incorporated, Newark, New Jersey (Boulez/Cage 1990, 194-198; Cage 1959NOTES/1970, 130; Cage/Duckworth 1989, 23; Cage/Kirby and Schechner 1965, 58; Cross, L.M. 1968, 54-56; Mumma 1975, 294).

May 1952-16 January 1953. New York. Made realization of Williams Mix in collaboration with Earle Brown and David Tudor (Cage 1959NOTES/1970, 130; Straebel 2012).

2 May 1952. New York, New School for Social Research (66 West 12th Street), Auditorium. David Tudor gave first performance of Water Music, presented as 66 W. 12, and performed Music of Changes, as well as music by Morton Feldman (Extensions 3 [first performance]; Intermission 5) and Christian Wolff (For Piano, For Prepared Piano); in the intermission discussion led by Henry Cowell (Dunn 1962, 43; Perkins 1952).

5 May 1952 (evening). New York, Cherry Lane Theatre (38 Commerce Street), A Concert of New Music, presented by the Living Theatre. Performed from Sonatas and Interludes (Sonata IV, XIII, XIV, Second Interlude) in program with music by Henry Cowell, Lucille Dlugoszewski, Lou Harrison, Alan Hovhaness, and Vanig Hovsepian (Dunn 1962, 18; Glanville-Hicks 1952b; J.B. 1952; New York Herald Tribune 1952a).

18 May 1952 (late afternoon). New York, Henry Street Playhouse (466 Grand Street). In dance concert by Louise Lippold and Shirley Broughton and group, performed (piano and celesta) with Alan Hovhaness and John Strauss (conductors), Andrew Lolya (flute), Jack Maxin (piano and tack piano), Joseph Marx (oboe), John Carisi and Maurice Peress (trumpets), Susan Muzzey and Thaddeus Brys (violoncellos), Diane Williams (harp), Richard Stryker (percussion and drone): Stefan Wolpe, Adagio (Broughton); Lou Harrison, A Pleasant Place (Lippold) and Praises for Hummingbirds and Hawks (Broughton); Snake and Winter Morning (Lippold, without music); Waiting (Lippold) and A Flower (Lippold); Morton Feldman, Quartet (Broughton); Alan Hovhaness, Song (Lippold); In a Landscape (Lippold, Diane Williams, harp) (Dunn 1962, 11, 21).

21 and 25 May 1952. Paris, Salle de l’ancien Conservatoire. 2 Concerts de musique concrŹte, presented by La Radiotélévision Franćaise. Presumably included music by Cage.

22 May 1952. Brooklyn, New York, Brooklyn Institute Theater: conducted Sixteen Dances, performed by unidentified ensemble, to Sixteen Dances for Soloist and Company of 3, by Merce Cunningham (Dunn 1962, 28).

10 July 1952. New York. Composed Music for Carillon No. 1 (graph version) and made transcription for a three-octave instrument (the date “October 1952” in the graph version is presumably incorrect).

14-15 June 1952. Waltham, Massachusetts, Brandeis University, Adolph Ullman Amphitheatre, Festival of the Creative Arts (12-15 June). Merce Cunningham and others gave first performance of Excerpts from Symphonie pour un homme seul (later productions titled Collage, music by Pierre Schaffer and Pierre Henry) and Igor Stravinsky, Les noces, conducted by Leonard Bernstein (14 June, evening); Cunningham participated in closing forum, moderated by Leonard Bernstein (15 June, evening); Cage presumably not in attendance (Lloyd, M. 1952; Vaughan 1997, 63-65).

28 July-19 August 1952. Burnsville, North Carolina, University of North Carolina, Woman’s College, Burnsville School of Fine Arts. Presumably on faculty with Merce Cunningham; taught course, “Experimentation and Analysis” (30 July-19 August); performed Sonatas and Interludes (28 July).

Before or during August 1952. New York. Composed For M.C. and D.T.

August 1952. Norwalk, Connecticut. David Tudor gave first performance of For M.C. and D.T. (Dunn 1962, 7).

August 1952. New York. Composed 4'33".

August 1952. Black Mountain, North Carolina, Black Mountain College. Third visit. Initiated and composed [Untitled] “concerted action,” a theatrical event involving the simultaneous, but independent presentation of piano music, dance, film and slide projections, paintings, the playing of phonograph records, as well as various poetry readings, which many consider to be the first “happening.” Cage performed it (by reading excerpts from Juilliard Lecture) with Merce Cunningham, dance; Charles Olson, poet; Robert Rauschenberg, phonograph; M. C. Richards, poet; David Tudor, piano (Cage 1961h, x; Cage/Kirby and Schechner 1965, 52-53, 55; Cage/Kostelanetz 1968WE/1970, 27; Duberman 1972; Fetterman 1996a; Harris, M. E. 1987, 226, 228; Kostelanetz 1969/1970, 203; Miller, L.E. 2002a; Rossum 1982, 17-18; Salzman 1974, 490; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 39; Vinton 1974, 300).

9 and 12 August 1952 (evenings). Black Mountain, North Carolina, Black Mountain College. David Tudor gave two recitals; performed Music of Changes in program with music by Morton Feldman and Christian Wolff (9 August); performed Two Pastorales and Water Music, presented as August 12, 1952 in shared program with music by Stefan Wolpe, Pierre Boulez, Morton Feldman (Intermission 4 and Intermission 5), and Henry Cowell (12 August) (Dunn 1962, 8-9, 19, 43).

29 August 1952. Woodstock, New York, Maverick Concert Hall. Attended first performance of 4'33" given by David Tudor, piano; Tudor also performed Water Music, presented as Aug. 29, 1952 (Dunn 1962, 25, 43; Kostelanetz 1970d, illustration 21; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 39).

12 October 1952 (evening) [the date of first performance 13 March 1951, Hartford, Connecticut, Julius Hartt School of Music, Hartt Chamber Orchestra, Moske Paranov (conductor), John Cage (prepared piano) is incorrect]. New York, Cooper Union, Great Hall, Cooper Union Forum, Music in the Making (the forum was actually canceled), presented in cooperation with Local 802 of the American Federation of Musicians (providing the orchestra). In rehearsal concert shared with music by Roger Goeb and Otto Luening (substituting Henry Brant and Eldin Burton), David Tudor (piano), ad hoc orchestra, David Broekman (conductor) gave first performance of Concerto for Prepared Piano and Chamber Orchestra (Bagar 1952; Bulletin of American Composers Alliance 1952-1953; New York Herald Tribune 1952b; Parmenter 1952a; Pritchett 1988a, 35-36).

26 October 1952 (afternoon). Princeton, New Jersey, Princeton University, Graduate College, Procter Hall. David Tudor performed Water Music, presented as Procter Hall G. C., as well as music by Pierre Boulez, Morton Feldman, Olivier Messiaen, Christian Wolff (Dunn 1962, 43).

9 November 1952. New York, Henry Street Playhouse (466 Grand Street). Ophelia performed by Mieczislav Kolinksi or Eugene Lester in dance recital by Jean Erdman in program shared with Tao Strong.

December 1952. New York. Composed Music for Piano 1.

16 December 1952. New York, Brooklyn High School for Homemaking. Performed with Jo Anne Melsher [and others?]: Music for Piano 1 to Paths and Events (first performance) (Dunn 1962, 8).

1953. Urbana, Illinois: Paul Price conducted ensemble in Imaginary Landscape No. 3 (Dunn 1962, 36).

5 February 1953. New Paltz, New York, State University Teachers College. Jean Erdman danced Portrait of a Lady to Imaginary Landscape No. 5; Jack Maxin performed Ophelia (Dunn 1962, 9, 37).

Prior to 21 March 1953. Wrote Music for Magnetic Tape: History [text].

21-24 March 1953. Urbana, Illinois, University of Illinois, Festival of Contemporary Arts. Attended; [with David Tudor, Earle Brown, Wolfgang Kuhn, and William Metzger?], at lecture-demonstration, “Music for Magnetic Tape,” first performance of Williams Mix, in program with music by Pierre Schaeffer, Pierre Henry, Otto Luening, Vladimir Ussachevsky, Louis Barron and Bebe Barron, For an Electronic Nervous System No. 1 (first performance); Olivier Messiaen, excerpt from Timbres-Durées; Christian Wolff, Part I from For Magnetic Tape to Suite by Chance (first performance); Pierre Boulez; Earle Brown, Octet (first performance) (22 March, afternoon, School of Music, Smith Music Hall); David Tudor performed Music of Changes and music by Pierre Boulez, Earle Brown, Morton Feldman and Christian Wolff (22 March, evening, School of Music, Recital Hall); performed Sixteen Dances [piano reduction] to Sixteen Dances for Soloist and Company of 3, by Merce Cunningham (24 March, Lincoln Hall Theatre) (Carter 1953; Chorpening 1953; Defibaugh 1953; Dunn 1962, 8, 28 [error], 41; Farlow 1953; Lamm 1953; Myers, F. 1953).

18 and 23 April 1953 (evenings). New York, Alvin Theatre [250 West 52nd Street], American Dance (14-26 April), presented by the B. de Rothschild Foundation. In a program shared with Martha Graham and Company’s Appalachian Spring and Letter to the World and Moore’s Pavane of Jose Limon, conducted Broadway premiere of Sixteen Dances, performed by ad hoc ensemble to Sixteen Dances for Soloist and Company of 3 by Merce Cunningham and Company [Natanya Neumann, Joan Skinner, Anneliese Widman] (Charlip 1954; Dunn 1962, 28; Herridge 1953; Martin, J. 1953; Terry, W. 1953).

May 1953. New York. Composed 57 1/2" for a String Player, Music for Piano 2 and Music for Piano 4-19.

June 1953. New York. Composed Music for Piano 3.

14 June 1953. New York. Composed 1'5 1/2" for a String Player.

23 June 1953. Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Louisiana State University, Louisiana State University Arts Festival. John Adams gave first performance of Music for Piano 4-19 to Solo Suite in Time and Space, by Merce Cunningham (Dunn 1962, 12-13; Vaughan 1994, 72, 289).

28 June 1953. New York. Composed 1'1/2" for a String Player.

29 June 1953. New York. Composed 1'18" for a String Player.

30 June 1953. New York. Composed 1'14" for a String Player.

July 1953. Black Mountain, North Carolina, Black Mountain College, Water Front Auditorium. David Tudor performed Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 20 [sic], Pierre Boulez, Second Sonata, Stefan Wolpe, Displaced Spaces (part two), Earle Brown, Perspectives, Olivier Messiaen, Mode de valeurs et d’intensités (Dunn 1962, 12).

July 1953. Black Mountain, North Carolina, Black Mountain College. David Tudor performed Olivier Messiaen, Mode de valeurs et d’intensités, Stefan Wolpe, Battle Piece, Anton Webern, Variationen Op. 27, Christian Wolff, For Piano II, Earle Brown, Three Pieces, Henry Cowell, Tiger.

2 July 1953. New York. Composed 59 1/2" for a String Player.

7 July 1953. Boulder, Colorado, University of Colorado. Jack Maxin performed with Jean Erdman: Ophelia and Imaginary Landscape No. 5 to Portrait of a Lady (Dunn 1962, 9, 37).

8 August 1953. New York. Composed Music for Piano 20.

21-22 August 1953. Black Mountain, Black Mountain College, Dining Hall. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham in shared program: Collage, Variation, Banjo (first performance of the dance) (21 August); Music for Piano 4-19 to Solo Suite in Time and Space (Tudor); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet (first performance of the dance, Arthur Komar and Tudor); Solo; Ragtime; Suite by Chance; Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (first performance of the dance, Tudor) (22 August) (Vaughan 1997, 73).

1 November 1953. Hartford, Connecticut, Hartford Athenaeum. Attended matinee concert by David Tudor, performing Music of Changes, Pierrre Boulez, PremiŹre sonate, Earle Brown, Perspectives, Morton Feldman, Extensions 3, Christian Wolff, For Prepared Piano (Dunn 1962, 8).

14 November 1953 (evening). Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Carnegie Institute of Technology, College of Fine Arts, Carnegie Theatre, presented by the International Society for Contemporary Music (Pittsburgh Chapter) in association with Carnegie Department of Music. Introduced and performed Sonatas and Interludes (Steinfirst 1953).

16 November 1953. New York, New School for Social Research, Henry Cowell: A Retrospective Concert of His Compositions. Possibly attended.

20 November 1953 (afternoon). New York, Public School 151 [91st Street and First Avenue], Yorkville Youth Council Conference of Workshops: gave workshop on the use of music in working with children in a play program.

9 December 1953. New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Theater for Dance, presented by Ann and Paul Lovett, second concert. Imaginary Landscape No. 5 presented to Jean Erdman’s dance, Portrait of a Lady in dance program (Dunn 1962, 37; Horst 1954).

29 December 1953-3 January 1954. New York, Theatre De Lys (121 Christopher Street). Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Root of an Unfocus (Cage); Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Banjo to Banjo (Tudor); Erik Satie, La diva de l’“Empire” to Two-Step (Cage); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Christian Wolff, For Magnetic Tape to Suite by Chance (29 December); Part I and IV of Amores to Amores; from Music for Piano 4-19 (with Tudor) to Solo Suite in Space and Time; Totem Ancestor; A Valentine out of Season to Trio; Pierre Boulez, Etude ą un son and Etude II (both on tape) to Fragments; Pierre Schaeffer, excerpts from Symphonie pour un homme seul to Collage; Erik Satie, Ragtime-Parade (30 December); from Music for Piano to Solo Suite in Space and Time; Erik Satie, Ragtime-Parade; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor); various nineteenth-century piano pieces (Tudor) to Dime a Dance (31 December); A Valentine out of Season to Trio; Pierre Schaeffer, excerpts from Symphonie pour un homme seul to Collage; Morton Feldman, Variations to Variation; Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Banjo to Banjo (Tudor); Christian Wolff, For Magnetic Tape to Suite by Chance (1 January); Part I and IV of Amores to Amores; Totem Ancestor; Pierre Boulez, Etude ą un son and Etude II (both on tape) to Fragments; Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Banjo to Banjo (Tudor); Erik Satie, Ragtime-Parade; various nineteenth-century piano pieces (Tudor) to Dime a Dance (2 January, matinee); from Music for Piano to Solo Suite in Space and Time; Root of an Unfocus; Morton Feldman, Variations to Variation; Erik Satie, Ragtime-Parade; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Christian Wolff, For Magnetic Tape to Suite by Chance (2 January, evening); Pierre Schaeffer, excerpts from Symphonie pour un homme seul to Collage; Erik Satie, Ragtime-Parade; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; various nineteenth-century piano pieces (Tudor) to Dime a Dance (3 January, matinee); Pierre Boulez, Etude ą un son and Etude II (both on tape) to Fragments; Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Banjo to Banjo (Tudor); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor); Christian Wolff, For Magnetic Tape to Suite by Chance; (3 January, evening); programs included nine choreographies (Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Banjo; Suite by Chance; from Music for Piano to Solo Suite in Space and Time; Collage; Fragments; Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo; Dime a Dance; Variation) in eight performances (Dance 1954; Dumm 1954; Dunn 1962, 13, 17, 18, 34; Lloyd, M. 1954; R.S., N.K., and Horst 1954).

1954 or 1955. Wrote Music Lovers’ Field Companion (text).

January 1954. New York. Presentation of Williams Mix (perhaps as part of performances, 29 December 1953-5 January 1954 or 10 January 1954) (Dumm 1954).

10 January 1954 (evening). New York, Educational Alliance, The Contemporary Dance Arts, Dance Concert. David Tudor performed with Louise Lippold (dancer): Music for Piano 2 (presumably first performance) to Dark Thoughts; Waiting in shared program with Tao Strong and Renate Schottelius (Dunn 1962, 8).

20 January 1954. Brooklyn, New York. Composed Music for Carillon No. 2 and Music for Carillon No. 3.

20 January 1954. New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music, auspices of Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Pierre Boulez, Etude ą un son and Etude II (both on tape) to Fragments; Christian Wolff, For Magnetic Tape to Suite by Chance; Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Banjo to Banjo and various nineteenth-century piano pieces to Dime a Dance (Tudor).

9 April and Spring 1954. Correspondence with Helen Wolff (Cage/Wolff 2005).

14 April 1954. New York, Carl Fischer Concert Hall (165 West 57th Street). In recital, David Tudor performed 4'33" (first New York performance, movement lengths 30", 2'23", 1'40") and Music of Changes; Earle Brown, Twenty-five Pages (first performance); Christian Wolff, For Piano II; Cage designed the program and was interviewed by Nancy Seely (J.B. 1954a; Dunn 1962, 9, 25; Genauer 1954; Harrison, J.S. 1954; Seely 1954; Trimble 1954).

28 April 1954. New York, Carl Fischer Concert Hall (165 West 57th Street). In recital, David Tudor performed Music for Piano 4-19 (first New York performance); Pierre Boulez, PremiŹre sonate (first New York performance); Earle Brown, Four Systems and Perspectives; Morton Feldman, Extensions 3 and Intersection 3 (first performance); Olivier Messiaen, “Mode de valeurs et d’intensités” (first New York performance); Stefan Wolpe, Presto furioso and 2 Studies; Christian Wolff, For Piano I; Cage designed the program (T.M.S. 1954).

1954. Stony Point, New York. Composed or completed 31'57.9864" for a Pianist and 34'46.776" for a Pianist and made [Untitled] [artwork].

2 May 1954. Merce Cunningham received a fellowship grant from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (Dance Observer 1954; New York Times 1954a).

Summer 1954. As the building at Monroe Street in which he lived was to be demolished (at least until November, he still also lived at 12 East 17th Street), Cage moved with M.C. Richards (1916-1999), David Tudor, David Weinrib and Karen Barnes to a cooperative community in Stony Point, New York, Gate Hill Road (Willow Grove), established by Paul Williams and Vera Williams (Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 39).

October-December 1954. Concert tour of Europe with David Tudor; the Holland-America liner Maasdam to Rotterdam met with a collision and returned to New York (2 October); with other passengers, Cage and Tudor arranged a flight to Amsterdam; their tour possibly included Stockholm (Cage 1961h, 146-147; New York Times 1954b; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 39).

16 October 1954. Attended Abendempfang, Schloß, Prinz und Prinzessin Max zu Fürstenberg.

17 October 1954 (matinee). Donaueschingen, Städtische Festhalle, Donaueschinger Musiktage für zeitgenössische Tonkunst (16-17 October), organized by Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde Donaueschingen. Performed with David Tudor: first performance of 31'57.9864" for a Pianist with 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor), presented as 12'55.6078" for Two Prepared Pianos (recorded on Col legno WWE 31899 [recordings]); and Christian Wolff, Duo for Pianists II; presented Williams Mix and Earle Brown, Octet (Brust 1954; Cage/Freedman 1976; Curjel 1954; Curjel 1955; Dunn 1962, 27; Heibe 1954a; Helm 1954a; Helm 1954b; Koegler 1954; Rieple 1959, 106; Ruppel 1954; Stuckenschmidt 1954a; Stuckenschmidt 1954b; Stuckenschmidt 1969b; Stuckenschmidt 1979, 260-261).

19 October 1954. Cologne, Nordwestdeutscher Rundfunk, Funkhaus, Kleiner Sendesaal, Musik der Zeit 1954-1955. In shared program, performed with David Tudor: 31'57.9864" for a Pianist with 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor), presented as 23'56.176" for 2 Pianists, as well as compositions by Earle Brown (Perspectives), Morton Feldman (Intersection 3, Tudor) and Christian Wolff (For Prepared Piano, Tudor); electronic music presented: Herbert Eimert, Glockenspiel and Etüde über Tongemische; Karel Goeyvaerts, Komposition Nr. 5; Paul Gredinger, Formanten I und II; Henri Pousseur, Seismogramme; Karlheinz Stockhausen, Studie I and Studie II (Dunn 1962, 27; Goeyvaerts 1983, 71).

25 October 1954. Paris, Salle Marguerite-Gaveau, second Festival de Musique of the Centre de Documentation de Musique Internationale in co-operation with the Groupe de Recherche Musicale de Musique ConcrŹte of the Radiodiffusion-Télévision Franćaise (21-26 October), Concert VIII, Musique Expérimentale. Introduced by Pierre Schaeffer, performed with David Tudor, 31'57.9864" for a Pianist, simultaneously with 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor), presented as 17'21.14.724" [sic, according to Hirsch], as part of program with tape music by L. and B. Baron, Eimert, Karel Goeyvaerts, P. Henry, M. Martenot, Meyer-Eppler, Darius Milhaud, Karlheinz Stockhausen, V. Ussachewsky, Edgard VarŹse (C. R. 1954; Dunn 1962, 27; Faure 1954; Guide du Concert 1954; Helm 1954b; Hirsch, N. 1954; Hughes, A. 1954; Onnen 1954; Pincherle 1954; Thoresby 1955).

26 October 1954. Brussels, Institut National Belge de Radiodiffusion, Musique d’Aujourd’hui. Performed (recorded studio performance) with David Tudor: 31'57.9864" for a Pianist, simultaneously with 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 27; Moulaert 1954).

Late October 1954. London, Composers’ Concourse. Gave first performance of 45' for a Speaker, simultaneously with 34'46.776" for a Pianist, performed by David Tudor (Cage 1961h, 146n; Scarr 1955).

29 October 1954. London, Mahatma Gandhi Hall, under the auspices of the Institute of Contemporary Arts. Introduced David Tudor, performing Water Music; Music for Piano 4-19 (perhaps with Cage); Morton Feldman, Extensions 3; Stefan Wolpe, Battle Piece (Dunn 1962, 12, 43; Mitchell, D. 1954).

3 November 1954 [according to Muggler 1992a 18 October 1954]. Zurich, Kunstgewerbemuseum [now Museum für Gestaltung Zürich], Vortragssaal, Pro Musica. Introduced by Hans Curjel, performed with David Tudor: 31'57.9864" for a Pianist, simultaneously with 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor), presented as 34'46.776" for Two Pianists; Water Music (Cage?); Morton Feldman, Extensions 3 (Tudor?), Intersection 3 (Tudor); Earle Brown, 4 Systems; Christian Wolff, For Piano I (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 27; Muggler 1992).

9 November 1954 [not 7 December] (evening). London, Forbes House (Halkin Street, Hyde Park corner), Diaghilev Exhibition (3 November-4 December), presented by The Observer (Outside Activities). Performed with David Tudor: 31'57.9864" for a Pianist with 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor); presented Williams Mix (Cater 1954; Dunn 1962, 27; Scarr 1955; Times 1954).

5 December 1954. Milan, Centro Culturale Pirelli. Performed with David Tudor: 31'57.9864" for a Pianist with 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 27).

8 December 1954. New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Theater for Dance, second concert. David Tudor performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Music for Piano 1-20 to Minutiae (first performance of the dance) and to Solo Suite in Time and Space; Louis Moreau Gottschalk, The Banjo to Banjo; Amores (I and IV) to Amores; Pierre Boulez, Etude ą un son and Etude II to Fragments (tape); Pierre Schaeffer, Symphonie pour un homme seul (excerpts) to Collage (tape); Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Horst 1955; Manchester 1955; Sorell 1954).

15 December 1954. New York, Carl Fischer Concert Hall (165 West 57th Street). Performed with David Tudor: 31'57.9864" for a Pianist with 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor), presented as 34'46.776" for Two Pianists; Tudor performed Karlheinz Stockhausen, Nr. 2 Klavierstücke I-VIII (first performance of VI-VIII); program repeated following intermission (Glanville-Hicks 1954b; J.B. 1954b; Musical America 1955; Musical Courier 1955; New York Post 1954).

Spring 1955. Hanover, New Hampshire, Dartmouth College. Completed or revised Music for Magnetic Tape: History [text].

22 March 1955, evening. Hanover, New Hampshire, Webster Hall, Dartmouth College Lecture Series, “Experimenting with Musical Tradition.” Gave brief introduction and performed with David Tudor, Karlheinz Stockhausen’s No. 2 Klavierstücke I-VIII (Tudor) and 34'46.776" for Two Pianos (Appel-Segal 1955; Stern 1955).

23 March 1955. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, Memorial Chapel, Assembly Series. Invited by Richard K. Winslow, gave brief lecture about impact of tape on music composition; performed with David Tudor: Karlheinz Stockhausen, Klavierstücke I-VIII (Tudor); 34'46.776" for Two Pianos and unknown pieces, among them presumably from Music for Piano (Wesleyan Argus 1955; Winslow 1955; Winslow 1981, 10-11; Winslow 1993).

1 April 1955. Admitted to the Limited Membership of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP).

27 May 1955. New York, Henry Street Playhouse. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19 to Minutiae (Dunn 1962, 13).

Prior to June 1955. Wrote “Experimental Music: Doctrine” (text), in which he defined as “experimental” “an act the outcome of which is unknown.” By favoring these to the detriment of conceptual thoughts, Cage acknowledged the influence of Chu Ch’an’s (John Blofeld’s) translation of The Huang Po Doctrine of Universal Mind (London: Buddhist Society, 1947) (Pritchett 1993, 76-77).

August-September 1955. Stony Point, New York. Composed 26'1.1499" for a String Player.

11 October 1955. Stony Point, New York. Completed Music for Piano 21-36/37-52.

15 October 1955 (evening). New City, New York, Clarkstown High School, Auditorium, presented by Rockland Foundation, Emile de Antonio, chairman of the board. Performed with David Tudor, Harold Coletta (viola), and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, Music for Piano 4-19 to Solo Suite in Time and Space; the same music to Minutiae; Earle Brown, Indices (piano version, first performance) to Springweather and People (Tudor); 31'57.9864" for a Pianist with 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor) and 26'1.1499" for a String Player (Coletta, first performance), as 34'46.776" for 2 Pianists and a String Player (concert performance); interviewed previously by Mariruth Campbell (Campbell, Mariruth 1955; Dunn 1962, 13, 27; Johns/Vaughan 1989, 137).

18 October 1955. Bronxville, New York, Sarah Lawrence College. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19 to Minutiae (according to program Tudor alone); Earle Brown, Indices (piano version) to Springweather and People (Tudor); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 13).

23 October 1955. New York, New School for Social Research, Auditorium, Greenwich Village Series, Music and Musicians of the Village. Performed with David Tudor: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52 (the latter presumably first performance), presented as Music for Two Pianos; program also featured music by Henry Cowell, Alan Hovhaness, and Elliott Carter, performed by the composers (Dunn 1962, 12).

November 1955. Santa Barbara, California. Composed Speech 1955.

November 1955. San Diego, California, Hoover Auditorium, presented by the Contemporary Arts Committee. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Music for Piano 1-20 to Solo Suite in Space and Time; Earle Brown, Indices (piano version) to Springweather and People (Tudor); Louis Moreau Gottschalk, The Banjo to Banjo (Tudor); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor) (Britton, J. 1955).

8-10 November 1955. Los Angeles, University of California, Department of Music: conducted two seminars (8 November, 4:00 pm and 9 November, 7:00 pm, Music Building 1325); read Experimental Music and performed with David Tudor, 31'57.9864" for a Pianist, with 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor) (9 November, 3:00pm, Music Building, Schoenberg Hall); performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham, from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52 to Minutiae (10 November) (Dunn 1962, 13, 27; Hefley 1955).

15 November 1955 (evening). San Francisco, Marine’s Memorial Theatre, presented by Doug Hudelson. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Pierre Boulez, Etude ą un son and Etude II to Fragments (tape); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Pierre Schaeffer, Symphonie pour un homme seul (excerpts) to Collage I (tape); Christian Wolff, For Magnetic Tape to Suite by Chance; further presented and introduced Williams Mix; Earle Brown, Octet; Morton Feldman, Intersection for Magnetic Tape (all tape); Cunningham taught a master class (16 November, evening, Halprin-Lathrop School) (Crowley 1955; Dunn 1962, 41; Fried 1955; Herman, J.L. 1955).

18 November 1955. Portland, Oregon, Portland State College. Performed with David Tudor: from Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, presented as Music for Piano 22, 24, 26, 33, 34, 36/37, 42, and from 31'57.9864" for a Pianist with 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor), presented as 26'29.283" for 2 Pianists, Earle Brown, Four Systems, Morton Feldman, Two Pieces for Two Pianos; Tudor performed Pierre Boulez, PremiŹre sonate, Christian Wolff, For Prepared Piano (Dunn 1962, 12, 27).

20-21 November 1955. Portland, Oregon, Civic Theatre. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52 to Minutiae (Dunn 1962, 13).

25 November 1955. Tacoma, Washington, Jason Lee Auditorium. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52 to Minutiae (Dunn 1962, 13).

2 December 1955. Vancouver, British Columbia, University of British Columbia. Performed with David Tudor: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, presented as 4x / 3y, and 31'57.9864" for a Pianist with 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 12, 27).

1956-1961 (1956-1957, 1957-1958, 1959-1960, and fall 1961). New York, New School for Social Research. Taught classes in experimental composition (twice weekly), attended by, among others, Stephen Addiss (1935), George Brecht (1926-2008), Jim Dine (1935), Carol Galente, Harvey Gross, Al Hansen (1927-1995), Dick Higgins (1938-1998), Scott Hyde (1926), Toshi Ichiyanagi (1933), Allan Kaprow (1927-2006), John Klein, Al Kousel, Jackson Mac Low (1922-2004), Larry Poons (1937), George Segal (1924-2000), Florence Tarlow, Robert Weblein (Brecht 1970; Cage 1970g; Cage/Bosseur, J.-Y. 1981, 105; Cage/Kirby and Schechner 1965, 66-68; Hansen, A.E. 1965, 81-82, 91-102; Higgins 1970b; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 39; Sohm 1970).

1956-1958. Employed as an art director and designer of typography by the textile firm Jack Lenor Larsen, Inc. (Cage 1967c, 15; Kostelanetz 1970d, illustrations 27-28).

14 January 1956. Stony Point, New York. Completed 27'10.554" for a Percussionist.

29 March 1956. Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, Bard College. First performance of Seven Haiku [recorded performance by David Tudor], as music to Karen Geiger, Three Dances for Haiku (Dunn 1962, 10).

6 April 1956. New York, Creative Film Foundation meeting. Presented On Film (Kostelanetz 1970d, 115).

20 April 1956 (evening). Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University, Sanders Theatre. Performed with David Tudor (three first performances), from Music for Piano 4-19 and Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, presented as Music for 2 Pianos; Water Music (Tudor); also music by Pierre Boulez, Earle Brown, Morton Feldman, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Anton Webern, and Christian Wolff (De Antonio 1956; Dunn 1962, 12, 43).

May 1956. Stony Point, New York. Composed Radio Music; wrote To Describe the Process of Composition Used in Music for Piano 21-52.

7 May 1956. New York. Completed Music for Piano 53-68.

8 May 1956. Stony Point, New York. Completed Music for Piano 69-84.

18 May 1956. South Bend, Indiana, Notre Dame University, The University of Notre Dame Concert and Lecture Series. David Tudor performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 (presumably first performances of Music for Piano 53-68 and Music for Piano 69-84) to Suite for Five in Time and Space (Cunningham 1982a, 177-178).

22 May 1956. Letter to Paul Henry Lang (Cage 1970d).

30 May 1956. New York, Carl Fischer Concert Hall (165 West 57th Street). Performed with Maro Ajemian, Grete Sultan (1906-2005), David Tudor and the Juilliard String Quartet: Pierre Boulez, Structures Ia (Ajemian and Tudor); Earle Brown, 4 More (Tudor, first performance); Karlheinz Stockhausen, Nr. 2 Klavierstücke I-VIII (four of them?, Tudor, VI and VII first performances); Morton Feldman, Two Pieces for Two Pianos (Ajemian and Tudor); Feldman, Structures (Juilliard String Quartet, first performance); first performance of Radio Music (all eight musicians); Anton Webern, Fünf Sätze, Op. 5 (Juilliard String Quartet); Christian Wolff, Suite (Tudor); two of Three Pieces for String Quartet and For String Quartet [sic] (Juilliard String Quartet, first performances); from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84, presented as Music for Four Pianos (Ajemian, Cage, Sultan, Tudor) (Cage 1970d; Dunn 1962, 12, 38; Gossett 1956; Harrison, J.S. 1956; Lang, P.H. 1956; New York Times 1956; Parmenter 1956; Rackliffe 1956).

11 July 1956 [some sources give 2 July 1956]. Lee, Massachusetts, Jacob’s Pillow. Merce Cunningham and Dance Company performed Nocturnes to Erik Satie, Cinq nocturnes (performed in different order and separated by silences) (Vaughan 1997, 92-97, 290; Volta 1982, 57).

August 1956. Danville, Vermont: conceived The Sun with Richard Lippold (film).

Fall 1956. Cornell College, Iowa. Merce Cunningham Dance Company residency.

Fall 1956, prior to 9 November. Wrote In This Day… [text].

9 November 1956. Saint Louis, Missouri, Principia College, Howard Hall. Presented In This Day… and performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68 and Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five (Cage 1961h, 94n; Dunn 1962, 13).

10 November 1956. Elsah, Illinois, Principia College, Morey Field House. Presented In This Day and performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68 and Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five (Cage 1961h, 94n; Dunn 1962, 13).

24 November 1956. Cologne, Galerie Der Spiegel. Water Music performed.

Winter 1956-prior to 12 January 1957. Stony Point, New York. Composed Winter Music (Cage 1964b/1970, 143).

1957. Marcel Duchamp, “The Creative Act” (published in the same year). Cage on many occasions approvingly paraphrased the conclusion of Duchamp’s statement: “All in all, the creative act is not performed by the artist alone; the spectator brings the work in contact with the external world by deciphering and interpreting its inner qualifications and thus adds his contribution to the creative act.”

12 January 1957. New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: first performance of Winter Music and from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five (Dunn 1962, 13, 14).

7 February 1957. Geneva, New York, Hobart and William Smith Colleges. Performed with David Tudor: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84, presented as Music for 2 Pianos, and Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 12, 14).

Winter 1957, prior to 10 February. Wrote Experimental Music [text].

10-13 February 1957. Chicago, Illinois, Congress Hotel, Music Teachers National Association, National Biennial Convention, Eighty-first Year: presented Experimental Music [text, 1957], assisted by David Tudor (piano); Paul Beckhelm, chairman; Anthony Donato presiding (10 February, morning, Florentine Room, North Wing) (Cage 1959a; Cage 1961h, 7n).

15 February 1957. Cincinnati, Ohio, Contemporary Arts Center. Performed with David Tudor, from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84, presented as Music for 2 Pianos, preceded or followed by statement [probably “Experimental Music,” 1957] (Darack 1957; Dunn 1962, 12).

February 1957. Cincinnati, Ohio, Cincinnati Art Museum. Performed with David Tudor, Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 14).

February 1957. Yellow Springs, Ohio, Antioch College. Performed with David Tudor: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84, presented as Music for 2 Pianos, and Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 12, 14).

20 February 1957. Akron, Ohio, Art Institute. Performed with David Tudor: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84, presented as Music for 2 Pianos, and Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 12, 14).

22 April 1957. New York, Carl Fischer Concert Hall (165 West 57th Street). In recital, David Tudor performed Bengt Hambraeus, Cercles (I: Spirales; II: Rondes); Bo Nilsson, Bewegungen and Schlagfiguren; Henri Pousseur, Impromptu et Variations II and Variations I; Karlheinz Stockhausen, Nr. 2 Klavierstück VI and Nr. 4 Klavierstück XI (performed twice) (Tcherny 1957a).

27 April 1957. New York, Henry Street Playhouse, Four Dancers: in program shared by four choreographers (Shirley Broughton, Katherine Litz, Merle Marsicano, Merce Cunningham) and preceded by a panel discussion chaired by David Vaughan, performed (probably with Edwin Hymovitz, Jack Maxin, David Tudor) from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84, to Suite for Five.

30 April 1957 (evening). New York, Carl Fischer Concert Hall. Performed with William Masselos, Grete Sultan and David Tudor, from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84, presented as Music for 4 Pianos, Winter Music, Earle Brown, Four Systems and Twenty-Five Pages (1953), and gave first performance of Morton Feldman, Piece for 4 Pianos; also performed were Morton Feldman, Extensions 4 (first performance, without Cage) and Christian Wolff, Sonata for Three [Prepared] Pianos, announced as Improvisation (first performance, presumably without Tudor) (Downes 1957; Dunn 1962, 12, 14; New York Times 1957; Tcherny 1957a).

14 May 1957. Yellow Springs, Ohio, Antioch College. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; Galaxy; Pierre Schaeffer, excerpts from Symphonie pour un homme seul (tape) to Collage; Banjo; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet (Feldman, Ph. 1957).

15 May 1957. Yellow Springs, Ohio, Antioch College. David Tudor performed Karlheinz Stockhausen, Klavierstück VII and Klavierstück XI.

Summer 1957, prior to 29 June. Wrote Morris Graves [text].

18 June 1957. New York, New School for Social Research. Began teaching courses, “Virgil Thomson: The Evolution of a Composer” and “Composition [Experimental Music]” (Summer semester, Tuesday and Thursday evenings).

11 February 1958. New York, New School for Social Research. Began teaching course, “Composition [Experimental Music]” (Spring semester, Tuesday afternoons).

September 1957. Stony Point, New York. Composed For Paul Taylor and Anita Dencks.

1 October 1957. New York, New School for Social Research. Began teaching course, “Erik Satie: The Evolution of a Composer” (Fall semester, Tuesday afternoons).

20 October 1957 (afternoon). New York, Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association, Theresa L. Kaufmann Concert Hall, Seven New Dances by Paul Taylor, with Anita Dencks, Donya Feuer, Toby Armour, Cynthia Stone. Included first performance of For Paul Taylor and Anita Dencks by David Tudor, as music to Duet, by Paul Taylor and Anita Dencks; Resemblance (Paul Taylor solo) also had music by Cage [unidentified piano piece performed by Tudor] (Dunn 1962, 7; Holzaepfel 1993, 334; Tcherny 1957c).

17 November 1957 (evening). New York, Nonagon [99 Second Avenue], Composers’ Showcase: participated in discussion period following piano recital by David Tudor with music by Cage (2 Haiku, Haiku, Haiku [sic], Music for Piano; Early Brown, 4 More; Morton Feldman, Piano Piece 1956 A, Piano Piece 1956 B; Bo Nilsson, Bewegungen, Schlagfiguren; Karlheinz Stockhausen, Klavierstück VII, Klavierstück XI; Christian Wolff, Suite), with Earle Brown and Morton Feldman; Charles Schwartz, moderator (Tcherny 1957b).

30 November 1957. New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music. David Tudor performed with Merce Cunningham Dance Company: Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (first performance of the dance) (Vaughan 1997, 290).

14 December 1957. Boston, Massachusetts, John Hancock Hall, presented by the Dance Teachers’ Club of Boston. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; Josef Matthias Hauer, Zwölftonspiel Mai 55, Juli 52, Juli 56, Labyrinthischer Tanz to Labyrinthian Dances; Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Ses yeux, polka de concert and The Banjo to Picnic Polka and Banjo; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor) (Lloyd, M. 1957).

15 December 1957. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University, John Knowles Paine Concert Hall, presented by the Harvard-Radcliffe Music Club. Performed with David Tudor: Winter Music; Earle Brown, Four Systems; gave first performances of Morton Feldman, Piano (3 Hands) and Two Pianos and Christian Wolff, Duo for Pianists; Tudor performed Henri Pousseur, Variations II; Bo Nilsson, Schlagfiguren and Bewegungen; Karlheinz Stockhausen, Nr. 7 Klavierstück XI (Dunn 1962, 14).

16 December 1957. Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University, Fine Arts Course Show. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (Clark Scarlet 1957).

1957-1958. Stony Point, New York. Composed Concert for Piano and Orchestra.

20 January 1958 or later in January. Stony Point, New York. Composed Variations I.

February 1958. Boston, Massachusetts, John Hancock Hall. Performed with Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five (Dunn 1962, 13).

11 February 1958. Durham, College of North Carolina. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five (Dunn 1962, 13).

15 March 1958. Greensboro, North Carolina, University of North Carolina, Women’s College, Music Building, Arts Festival. Performed with David Tudor, Variations I (first performance, three different performances, presented as Variations), Earle Brown, 4 Systems, Morton Feldman, Intermission 6B, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Klavierstück XI (Tudor alone), Christian Wolff, Duo for Pianists (three performances of each composition) (Dunn 1962, 13 [error], 28).

18 March 1958. New Brunswick, New Jersey, Rutgers University, Little Theatre. David Tudor performed with Paul Taylor and Anita Dencks: For Paul Taylor and Anita Dencks to Duet and Variations I to Resemblance (Taylor) (Dunn 1962, 7, 29).

Spring 1958. Stony Point, New York. With the assistance of David Tudor, made instrumentation for Six Short Inventions.

27 March 1958. Stony Point, New York. Completed Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra.

28 March 1958. Transcribed Music for Carillon No. 1 for a two-octave instrument.

April 1958 or earlier. New Brunswick, New Jersey, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. First read Communication (Cage 1961h, 18n).

May 1958. New York, Stable Gallery (924 Seventh Avenue). Exhibition of scores (Ashton 1958).

15 May 1958. New York, Town Hall (113 West 43rd Street), 25-Year Retrospective Concert of the Music of John Cage. Performed (on prepared piano) Duet from She Is Asleep and The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs with Arline Carmen; conducted first performance of Six Short Inventions, performed by Andrew Lolya (alto flute), Albert Kaufman (clarinet in B flat), Melvyn Broiles (trumpet in B flat), Anahid Ajemian (violin), Burton Fisch, William Gromko (violas), Joan Brockway (violoncello); David Tudor (piano), Andrew Lolya (alto flute, flute, piccolo), Albert Kaufman (clarinet in B flat), Sy Schwartzberg (bassoon, baritone saxophone), Melvyn Broiles (trumpets in F, E flat, D, C, and B flat), Frank Rehak (trombone), Don Butterfield (tubas in F and B flat), Anahid Ajemian, Allan Martin, Isadore Cohen (violins), Burton Fisch, William Gromko (violas), Joan Brockway (violoncello), Jesse Teiko (double bass), Merce Cunningham (conductor), gave first performance of Concert for Piano and Orchestra; David Tudor gave first performance of Music for Carillon No. 1; the Manhattan Percussion Ensemble: Paul Price, Michael Colgrass, Warren Smith and Philip Brown, gave first performance of “Quartet: 12 Tom Toms” from She Is Asleep (Avakian 1959; Biancolli 1958a; Biancolli 1958b; Cage 1961h, 31; Dunn 1962, 21, 22, 25, 27, 31; Friedman, Sy 1958; Harrison, J.S. 1958a; Johns/Vaughan 1989, 138; Kastendieck 1958; Kolodin 1958; Kostelanetz 1970d, illustrations 31-33; New York Post 1958; Parmenter 1958; Rehak 1980; Sabin 1958).

21 May 1958. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, University of Pittsburgh. Performed with Merce Cunningham: part I and IV of Amores to Amores (Dunn 1962, 34).

24 May 1958. Stony Point, New York. Transcribed Music for Carillon No. 2 for a two-octave instrument.

Prior to 25 May 1958. Stony Point, New York. Composed Solo for Voice 1.

25 May 1958. New York, Village Vanguard. Performed A Valentine out of Season, A Flower and The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs with Arline Carmen; Arline Carmen (contralto) gave first performance of Solo for Voice 1, with Concert for Piano and Orchestra, presented as Concert for Voice, Piano, and Four Instruments, performed by David Tudor (piano), Albert Kaufman (clarinet), Melvyn Broiles (trumpet), Frank Rehak (trombone), Don Butterfield (tuba), Merce Cunningham conducting; Tudor performed Music for Carillon No. 1 (Avakian 1959XCHECK; Dunn 1962, 19, 21, 22, 25, 31).

Prior to 10 June 1958. Interviewed by Mike Wallace (1918-2012) (Cage/Wallace 1958).

June-July 1958. New York, New School for Social Research: taught classes in composition of experimental music; wrote [Untitled] (text, Two Short Poems), in collective effort with class (Cage 1970NEW; Hansen 1965PRIMER, 81-82, 91-102; Higgins 1968BOREDOM, 15; Kostelanetz 1970d, 120n; Higgins 1970JUNE; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 39).

1 July 1958. Muncie, Indiana, Ball State Teachers College, Assembly Hall, Summer Arts Festival, Crossroads of America (30 June-2 July). Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five (Dunn 1962, 13; Ludington 1958).

14-17 August 1958. New London, Connecticut, Connecticut College for Women, American Dance Festival. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (conductor, first performance of the dance) (14 August); Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace (first performance) (17 August) (Cunningham 1982a, 178-179; Dunn 1962, 32).

Late August 1958. Traveled to Europe (Higgins 1970JUNE, 123).

Prior to 6 September 1958. Wrote Changes.

3-9 September 1958. Darmstadt, Internationale Ferienkurse für Neue Musik, Wolfgang Steinecke, director. Attended; performed with David Tudor: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84, presented as Music for Two Pianos, Variations I, Winter Music; Earle Brown, Four Systems; Morton Feldman, Two Pianos; Christian Wolff, Duo for Pianists, and gave first performance of Christian Wolff, Duo II (3 September, Schloß Kranichstein); performed with David Tudor: Changes with Music of Changes (Tudor), Schloß Kranichstein (6 September); performed Indeterminacy; Klavierstück XI by Karlheinz Stockhausen (Tudor) and Variations I with David Tudor (8 September, Schloß Heiligenberg); performed Communication (9 September, Schloß Heiligenberg); among the participants were Isang Yun, Nam June Paik (Cage 1961h, 18n, Andriessen and Mengelberg/Bernlef 1981; Andriessen et al./Schouten 1973; Darmstädter Beiträge 1959; Darmstädter Echo 1958; Dunn 1962, 12, 14, 28; Herzogenrath 1976, 18; Iddon 2007; Kagel 1958; Kayser 1958; Kortsen 1959; Metzger, H.-K. 1958; Meyer-Denkmann 2002; Paik 1959; Porena 1958; Schiffer 1958; Stuckenschmidt 1958; Trudu 1992; Widmaier 1958).

19 September 1958. Cologne, Westdeutscher Rundfunk, Kleiner Sendesaal, Musik der Zeit. In shared program with music by Ernst Krenek (Hexaeder), Karlheinz Stockhausen (Klavierstück XI, two performances), Mauricio Kagel (Streichsextett), and Pierre Boulez (Sonatine for flute and piano), performed with David Tudor, piano; Willy Schwegler, flute; Martin Härtwig, clarinet; Helmut Schneidewind, trumpet; Helmut Schmitt, trombone; Berthold Haas, tuba, Theo Giesen and Ernst Nagel, violins; Paul Schröer or Peter Busbach, viola, Helmut Küfer or Henk Welling, violoncello; Emil Morneweg, contrabass (Kölner Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester): Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Dibelius 1968; Dunn 1962, 31).

Late September 1958-1959. Wrote Indeterminacy: New Aspect of Form in Instrumental and Electronic Music, begun in Stockholm (Cage 1959g).

23 September 1958. Completed Edgard VarŹse [text].

24 September 1958. Stockholm. Composed Music Walk.

Late September-prior to 9 October 1958. Stockholm. Wrote Indeterminacy: New Aspect of Form in Instrumental and Electronic Music (first thirty stories) (Cage 1959g).

2 October 1958. Copenhagen, Danmarks Radio. Performed with David Tudor: Music for Piano 21-36/37-52 (Music for Piano 27) and Variations I (Dunn 1962, 29).

3 October 1958. Warsaw, Second International Festival of Contemporary Music, Warsaw Autumn (27 September-3 October). David Tudor performed Music of Changes [parts I and IV] (Dunn 1962, 9; Helm 1958).

5 October 1958. Stockholm, Konserthuset, Fylkingen. Performed with David Tudor: Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 14).

5 October 1958. Stockholm, Kunglig Teatern. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: part I and IV of Amores to Amores; from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Two, and Variations I (Dunn 1962, 13, 28, 34).

6 or 7 October 1958. Cologne, Nordwestdeutsches Fernsehen. Composed TV Köln, instantaneously given its first performance by David Tudor (Cage 1967o, 136; Dunn 1962, 13, 11; Kölner Gesellschaft 1983, 29; ***compare also Cage 1959[Indeterminacy: Folkways]; Cage Box, 31).

8-9 October 1958. Brussels, World Fair (Expo 1958), Journées internationales de musique expérimentale = Internationale Dagen van Experimentele Muziek (5-10 October). Performed with Marcelle Mercenier and David Tudor: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84, presented as Music for Three Pianos, and Winter Music; Christian Wolff, Music for Three Prepared Pianos (German Pavillion, 8 October); performed with David Tudor: first performance of Indeterminacy: New Aspect of Form in Instrumental and Electronic Music (according to Cage 1959g without accompaniment), presented as Solo for Piano with Indeterminacy, and Variations I and Duo for Pianists by Christian Wolff (9 October, French Pavillion) (Cage 1959g; Charles 1965/1970, 184; Cross, L.M. 1974, 769; Dunn 1962, 12, 14, 32; Kostelanetz 1970d, illustration 38; Leeuw, T. de 1958; Schaeffer 1967, 65; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 39; Stockhausen/Cott 1974, photo between pp. 128-129).

14 October 1958. Düsseldorf, Galerie 22, Jüngste Klaviermusik. Hosted by Jean Pierre Wilhelm and introduced by Heinz-Klaus Metzger (1932-2009), spoke and performed with David Tudor, Music Walk (first performance, with Cornelius Cardew, ten-minute performance), Variations I (presented as Variations), Earle Brown, 4 Systems, Morton Feldman, Piano (3 Hands), Franco Evangelisti, Proiezioni Sonore (Tudor), Karlheinz Stockhausen, Klavierstück XI (Tudor), Christian Wolff, For Piano with Preparations (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 28, 42; K. 1958; Leve 1982, 28-37; Müller, P. 1958; Schab 1958; Schultz, H. 1958).

20 October 1958. Oxford, Oxford University. Performed with David Tudor: Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 14).

28 October 1958. Hamburg, Norddeutscher Rundfunk, Das neue Werk. Performed with David Tudor, Merce Cunningham and Carolyn Brown: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68 and Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Two; Morton Feldman, Intermission 6 (without dance); Earle Brown, Galaxy and Duet from Springweather and People; Morton Feldman, Piano Piece 1956 A (Tudor, without dance); Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 13; Peters, Kurt 1958-1959).

Late 1958. Italy (Gatti, G. 1959).

November 1958. Milan. Composed Fontana Mix.

November 1958-March 1959. Milan. Invited by Luciano Berio to work at the Studio di Fonologia della RAI (Radio Audizione Italiana, Radiotelevisione Italiana); Cage lived alternatingly in Milan and with Peggy Guggenheim in Venice; made the acquaintance of Juan Hidalgo and Walter Marchetti (Cage 1959g; Kostelanetz 1970d, illustration 37; La Motte-Haber 1994; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 39-40).

November 1958-February 1959. Milan, Radio Audizione Italiana, Studio di Fonologia Musicale. With technical assistance of Marino Zuccheri, made realization of Fontana Mix for four-track tape (November-January), as well as tapes for Sounds of Venice and Water Walk (Dunn 1962, 40; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 39-40).

November or December 1958. Milan. Composed Aria.

20 December 1958. Milan. Performed with Luciano Berio from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84, presented as Music for 2 Pianos, Variations I and Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 12, 14, 28).

January 1959. Milan. Composed Sounds of Venice and Water Walk.

5 January 1959. Rome, Ridotto dell’Eliseo, Accademia Filarmonica Romana. Performed with Luciano Berio: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84, presented as Music for 2 Pianos; Variations I; Winter Music; Cathy Berberian (1925-1983), then Berio’s wife, gave first performance of Aria with Fontana Mix (also first performance) (Dunn 1962, 12, 14, 20, 28; Mont. 1959).

8 January 1959. Florence, Circolo Leonardo da Vinci. Performed with Luciano Berio, from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84, presented as Music for 2 Pianos, Variations I and Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 12, 14, 28).

21 January 1959. Milan, Rotonda del Pellegrini: in a shared program, performed from Music for Piano 69-84 and two pieces from Morton Feldman’s Three Pieces for Piano (1954) (recorded on Alga Marghen 11NMN.031) (Bonomo 1999).

January 1959. Milan, Radio Audizione Italiana television. Appeared several times in Mike Bongiorno’s television quiz show “Lascia o radoppia,” winning the 5,000,000 lira prize. For the quiz he wrote and performed Sounds of Venice and Water Walk (first performances). Became honorary member, Gruppo Micologico “G. Bresadola,” Trent, Italy (Muenz 2005; Pratesi 1993).

January 1959. Milan, Radio Audizione Italiana television. Performed part I and IV from Amores (Cage/Kirby and Schechner 1965, 61).

January 1959. Milan, Radio Audizione Italiana television: gave first performance of Sounds of Venice (Cage/Kirby and Schechner 1965, 61-62; Dunn 1962, 42).

January 1959. Milan, Radio Audizione Italiana television: gave first performance of Water Walk (Cage/Kirby and Schechner 1965, 61-62; Dunn 1962, 43; Kostelanetz 1970d, illustration 40).

January 1959. Milan, Radio Audizione Italiana television: appearance on Italian TV quiz of Mike Bongiorno, “Lascia o radoppia,” won 5,000,000 lire = $ 6,000 (Cage/Bongiorno 1975PROFETA; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 39-40).

7 February 1959, Padua, Circolo del Pozzetto (1 via E. Filiberto). Performed with Teresa Rampazzi, Heinz-Klaus Metzger and Sylvano Bussotti: from Music for Piano, Winter Music, Variations I (two versions), Concert for Piano and Orchestra (tape presentation of 19 September 1958 performance), and Music Walk.

7 March 1959. Returned to New York via Amsterdam (Cage 1959g; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 40).

19 March 1959. New York, New York University, La Maison Franćaise. David Tudor performed from Music for Piano (27, 21, 32, 35, 36) in shared program with music by Olivier Messiaen, Pierre Boulez (PremiŹre sonate), Franco Evangelisti (Proiezioni sonore), Bo Nilsson, Henri Pousseur, Christian Wolff (For Piano, For Prepared Piano); Cage wrote program notes, Remarks before a Recital (Dunn 1962, 12; A. H. 1959).

Spring 1959. New York, New School for Social Research: taught courses in mushroom identification, where he met Guy G. Nearing (1911-1986) and Lois Long (1918-2005); music of Virgil Thomson; experimental composition (Cage 1970h; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 40).

30 March 1959. New York, City Center. With Aaron Copland attended New York City Opera performance of Gian Carlo Menotti, Maria Golovin (MacDougall 1959).

April 1959. New York, Columbia University, Teachers College. Performed with David Tudor: Indeterminacy: New Aspect of Form in Instrumental and Electronic Music with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor, piano) (Cage 1959g, [5]; Dunn 1962, 32).

7 April 1959 (evening). New York, Young Men’s & Young Women’s Hebrew Association, Theresa L. Kaufmann Concert Hall (Lexington Avenue). David Tudor performed with the Audio-Visual Group: Music of Changes (Tudor); Alfred Hansen, Alice Denham in 48 Seconds; Dick Higgins, Six Episodes for the Aquarian Theater; Christian Wolff, Suite (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 9; Lang, P. H. 1959; Schonberg 1959; Siff 1959b).

11 April 1959 (evening). Washington, D.C., Roosevelt Auditorium (13th and Allison Streets, N.W.), presented by the Modern Dance Council. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68 and Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; Earle Brown, 4 Systems to Galaxy; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (Cage); Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 13).

11 April 1959. Milan, Teatro Nuovo, Incontri Musicali. Cathy Berberian performed Aria with Fontana Mix (Dunn 1962, 20).

18 April 1959. Bronxville, New York, Sarah Lawrence College, Intercollegiate Conference, Zen Buddhism in American Culture. Participated in panel discussion on Zen and the Arts with Vera Brenson and Lynn Lunbar [and presumably with Muriel Rukeyser] (afternoon, White Room); followed by summary session.

Before 26 April 1959. Completed Virgil Thomson, co-authored with Kathleen Hoover (book).

26 April 1959 (late afternoon). New York, Village Gate (124 [145?] Thompson Street), A Sunday Afternoon of Contemporary Music, produced by David Johnson in association with the Village Voice and the Record Hunter. Attended (with Edgard VarŹse) and introduced. David Tudor performed Winter Music; Morton Feldman, Last Pieces, and Earle Brown, Music for Cello and Piano (with David Soyer); presentations of Fontana Mix (first US performance); Newman Guttman, Computer Music; Richard Maxfield, Electronic Score from Stacked Deck (first performance); and Edgard VarŹse, PoŹme électronique (Musical America 1959; Parmenter 1959; Siff 1959a; Village Voice 1959).

June 1959. New York, Channel 13 television, Henry Morgan Show. Performed Water Walk (Dunn 1962, 43; Wallace, E. 1959).

July 1959. Recorded a version of Indeterminacy: New Aspect of Form in Instrumental and Electronic Music consisting of ninety stories with musical accompaniment by David Tudor (piano), who performed “Solo for Piano” from Concert for Piano and Orchestra, using Fontana Mix (Cage 1959g, [6]).

July 1959. Canarias, El Museo Canario, Días de Nueva Musica (1, 2, 10, 14, 17 July 1959), director Juan Hidalgo. Quartet (14 July) and Music of Changes (17 July) presented (as recordings).

21 July 1959. Vancouver, British Columbia, University of British Columbia. Jack Maxin performed Ophelia (Dunn 1962, 10).

13-14 August 1959. New London, Connecticut, Connecticut College for Women, Frank Loomis Palmer Auditorium, Twelfth American Dance Festival (13-16 August). Performed with David Tudor, the American Dance Festival Orchestra, and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: conducted Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet (13 August); and first performance of Christian Wolff, Music for Merce Cunningham to Rune (14 August), both in shared programs (Dunn 1962, 32).

Post-August 1959. Wrote untitled text for Folkways FT 3704.

Mid-1959. Rome, ISCM Festival (Carter 1959).

29 August and 4 September 1959. Darmstadt, Internationale Ferienkurse für Neue Musik (25 August-5 September). In a series of lectures on “Musik und Graphik,” Karlheinz Stockhausen discussed Concert for Piano and Orchestra, David Tudor performing (29 August, Kongreß-Saal Mathildenhöhe); Cathy Berberian performed Aria with Fontana Mix in Bruno Maderna’s lecture on compositions with tape (4 September, afternoon, Stadthalle) (Dunn 1962, 20).

28 October 1959. Cologne, Staatliche Hochschule für Musik. David Tudor performed Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 14).

November 1959. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University. Ronald Hathaway, violin; Christian Wolff, piano, gave first (presumably) performance of Six Melodies for Violin and Keyboard.

13 November 1959. Düsseldorf, Galerie 22 (Kaiserstraße 22), opening of exhibition on Horst Egon Kalinowski. Nam June Paik gave first performance of his Hommage ą John Cage; Cage’s attendance uncertain (Herzogenrath 1976, 18; Sohm 1970).

15 November 1959. Vienna, Mozartsaal, Internationale Gesellschaft für Neue Musik. David Tudor (piano) and Ensemble Die Reihe, Kurt Schwertsik (conductor) performed Concert for Piano and Orchestra (two versions, one with Edith Urbanczyk, voice) as well as music by Earle Brown, Sylvano Bussotti, Cornelius Cardew, Morton Feldman, Christian Wolff (Dunn 1962, 31; Willnauer 1960).

25 November 1959. Previously on the Editorial Board of the New Music Society, admitted as full member of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), and of Local 802, American Federation of Musicians.

30 November 1959. Berkeley, California, KPFA. Ensemble conducted by Glenn Glasow performed Imaginary Landscape No. 4 (Dunn 1962, 37).

2 December 1959 (afternoon). Berkeley, California, University of California, Departement of Music, Hertz Hall. Ensemble conducted by Dennis Johnson performed Imaginary Landscape No. 4 in shared program with music by Dennis Johnson, La Monte Young and Richard Maxfield (Dunn 1962, 36).

10 December 1959. Millbrook, New York, Bennett College, Harkaway Theatre. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68 and Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor, piano solo) with Fontana Mix (Cage, tapes), presented as Solo for Piano with Fontana Mix, to Antic Meet; Pierre Schaeffer, from Symphonie pour un homme seul to Collage I (tape); Earle Brown, 4 Systems to Galaxy; Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 13, 32).

1960-1961. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University (President: Victor L. Butterfield), Center for Advanced Studies in the Liberal Arts, Professions, and Sciences: appointed Fellow; gave humanities classes in experimental music with freshmen; read Lecture on Nothing at the John Wesley Club [date unknown] (Cannel 1960; Register Magazine 1961; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 40).

1960. Middletown, Connecticut. Wrote “Ladies of the Monday Club and Gentlemen of the Faculty.”

1960. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University. Read Ladies of the Monday Club and Gentlemen of the Faculty (Kostelanetz 1970d, 135n).

1960. Performed Lecture on Nothing (Cage 1961h, 126n).

1960. Made the acquaintance of or began to correspond with Marshall McLuhan.

1960 or 1961. Middletown, Connecticut. Compiled List no. 2 (Kostelanetz 1970d, 138n).

January 1960. Stony Point, New York. Composed Theatre Piece.

January 1960. New York, Channel 2 television, Garry Moore’s show “I’ve Got a Secret.” Performed Water Walk (Dunn 1962, 43; Paolini 2009).

January 1960. New York, Living Theatre. Performed Suite for Toy Piano; Imaginary Landscape No. 5 presented (Dunn 1962, 11, 37).

January-May 1960. Stony Point, New York; Middletown, Connecticut; Ann Arbor, Michigan. Composed WBAI.

17 January 1960. San Francisco, California, Opus 1 Composers’ Workshop. La Monte Young performed Music Walk (Dunn 1962, 42).

25 January 1960. New York, Living Theatre. Performed with David Tudor (piano), read Indeterminacy: New Aspect of Form in Instrumental and Electronic Music with Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra, presented as Solo for Piano with Indeterminacy (Dunn 1962, 32; Salzman 1960c).

31 January 1960. Saint Louis, Missouri, Hanley Junior High School, Auditorium. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet, other music by Cage, and music by Morton Feldman and Christian Wolff (Sasonkin 1960).

February 1960. Stony Point, New York. Composed Music for Amplified Toy Pianos.

February 1960. New York, WBAI [radio station]. Performed with David Tudor: Communication with WBAI (Tudor, first performance) (Dunn 1962, 41).

3 February 1960. Carbondale or Edwardsville, Illinois, Southern Illinois University, School of Fine Arts, Department of Music, Shryock Auditorium, Fine Arts Festival 1960. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Solo for Piano) to Antic Meet (Tudor); Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace; Christian Wolff, For Pianist with Duo II for Pianists to Rune; Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor).

6 February 1960. New York, Young Men’s-Young Women’s Hebrew Association (Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street), Theresa L. Kaufmann Concert Hall, Music in Our Time: 1900-1960. Conducted first performance of Atlantis by Morton Feldman, performed by David Tudor (piano), Seymour Barab (violoncello), Robert Jaspar (flute), Charles Russo (bass clarinet), Ralph Froelich (horn), Andrew Baron (trumpet), Raymond Orcutt (trombone), Sonya Kahn (harp), Morris Goldenberg (xylophone), Joseph Adato (vibraphone), in program shared with Donald Erb, William Mayer, and Arnold Schoenberg; question period in Kaufmann Art Gallery (Trimble 1960).

16 February 1960. New York, Phoenix Theatre (Second Avenue). Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, conducted ad hoc orchestra (Martin Ornstein, Andrew Loyola, John Perras, flutes; Albert Kauffman, clarinet; Sanford Sharoff, bassoon; Teddy Weiss, trumpet; Ralph Froelich, French horn; Frank Rehak, trombone; Don Butterfield, tuba; David Tudor, piano; Anahid Ajemian, violin; Joseph Glassman, viola; Seymour Barab, violoncello; Harold Shachner, contrabass) in Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace; Christian Wolff, Music for Merce Cunningham to Rune; Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 32; Johns/Vaughan 1989, 138; Rehak 1980).

25 February 1960. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, Honors College. Performed with David Tudor, Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra with Fontana Mix and WBAI, Music Walk; Tudor gave first performance of Music for Amplified Toy Pianos, and performed Winter Music, and Christian Wolff, For Piano with Preparations, For Pianist (Dunn 1962, 14, 31, 38).

26 February 1960. New York, New School for Social Research, Artist’s Choice. In shared program, Walter Trampler performed 1'14" for a String Player or 26'1.1499" for a String Player (violin) (Village Voice 1960).

7 March 1960. New York, Circle in the Square Theatre (159 Bleecker Street), Composers’ Showcase, Third Concert. In program shared with music by Henry Cowell, co-ordinated first performance of Theatre Piece, by Merce Cunningham and Carolyn Brown, dancers; Don Butterfield, tuba; Arline Carmen, contralto; Nicola Cernovich with Richard Nelson, lights and actions; Frank Rehak, trombone, and David Tudor, pianist; followed by discussion with Cage, Henry Cowell and Charles Schwartz (Cage/Kirby and Schechner 1965, 62; Dunn 1962, 42; Flanagan, W. 1960; Musical Courier 1960; Rehak 1980; Salzman 1960a; Stuckenschmidt 1960; Stuckenschmidt 1979, 321-322; Time 1960a).

8 March 1960. New York, Merce Cunningham’s studio. Interviewed by Nicholas Zill and David Orme-Johnson (Zill and Orme-Johnson 1960).

14 March 1960. New York, Living Theatre (530 Avenue of the Americas). Concert of New Music (two evening concerts). In shared program with music by Allan Kaprow, George Brecht, Robert Rauschenberg, Richard Maxfield, Al Hansen, and John Herbert McDowell, Suite for Toy Piano performed and Imaginary Landscape No. 5 presented; Cage’s participation or attendance uncertain (Brecht 1960; Gross, A. 1960; Robinson, Jean 1960b; Sohm 1970).

Spring 1960 (two evenings). New York, Circle in the Square. David Tudor performed Ophelia (Dunn 1962, 9).

26 March 1960. Cologne, Mary Bauermeister (Lintgasse 28 am Alter Markt). Vernissage of exhibition (with others), Musik Texte Malerei Architektur.

28 March 1960. New York, Living Theatre. David Tudor performed compositions by Sylvano Bussotti, Cornelius Cardew, Franco Evangelisti, Gottfried Michael Koenig, Bo Nilsson, Kurt Schwertsik, Karlheinz Stockhausen (Salzman 1960d).

4 April 1960. New York, Living Theatre (530 Sixth Avenue). Performed with David Tudor: Music Walk, WBAI (Cage) with Fontana Mix and Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor); Music for Amplified Toy Pianos (Tudor); Winter Music (Tudor); Tudor also performed Christian Wolff, For Pianist and For Piano with Preparations (Dunn 1962, 14, 31, 38, 42; Robinson, Jean 1960a).

11 April 1960. New York, Living Theatre (530 Sixth Avenue). David Tudor performed with Toshi Ichiyanagi: Cornelius Cardew, Two Books of Study for Pianists; Christian Wolff, Duo for Pianists II; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano No. 2 (first performance); La Monte Young, Poem for Chairs, Tables, Benches, etc. (or Other Sound Sources) (the latter composition with the assistance of John Cage, Merce Cunningham, and James Spicer); all compositions performed twice.

12 April-1 May 1960. New York, Great Jones Gallery (5 Great Jones Street), Janet Keyishian, director, exhibition of scores from Fontana Mix and Music Walk, in show with works by Kenneth Rexroth, Frederick Kiesler, and Julian Beck; vernissage 12 April.

15 April 1960. WGBH-FM, Our American Music, Series IV. Sonatas and Interludes broadcast (Maro Ajemian, Dial 19, 18'16" excerpt); commentator Gardner Read.

22 April 1960. Berkeley, California, KPFA radio. Paula Morgan and Gardner Rust performed Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 15).

26 April 1960. Buffalo, State University of New York. Performed with David Tudor, Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra with Fontana Mix and WBAI, Music Walk; Tudor performed Music for Amplified Toy Pianos, Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 14, 31, 38, 42).

27 April 1960. Hamilton, New York, Colgate University, Library Lecture Room. Performed with David Tudor, Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra with Fontana Mix and WBAI and Music Walk; Tudor performed Music for Amplified Toy Pianos, Winter Music, and Christian Wolff, For Piano with Preparations, For Pianist (Dunn 1962, 14, 31, 38, 42).

May 1960. Began a lifelong association with C.F. Peters Corporation. Cage had approached its president, Walter Hinrichsen (1907-1969), with the hope of getting his music published. (The body of his work had remained unpublished previously.) Hinrichsen offered him an exclusive contract (signed 27 July 1960) with the Henmar Press of the Peters Corporation (Cage 1981STATEMENT; Cage, Foreman and Kostelanetz/Anonymous 1979; Cage/Gagne and Caras 1982; Gillespie 2012; Johnson, Thomas F. 1962; Kostelanetz 1988CONVERSING, 21).

May 1960. Stony Point, New York. Composed Music for The Marrying Maiden.

May-15 June 1960. Realized tape for Music for The Marrying Maiden with technical assistance of Richard Maxfield (Dunn 1962, 40).

May 1960. Jamestown, New York, Jamestown Community College. Performed with David Tudor, Indeterminacy: New Aspect of Form in Instrumental and Electronic Music with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Dunn 1962, 32).

2 May 1960. San Francisco, California, San Francisco State College, Main Auditorium (1600 Holloway Avenue). Luciano Berio gave lecture-concert, “Electronic Music in Italy,” as part of which Cathy Berberian performed Aria with Fontana Mix (Dunn 1962, 20 [error]).

9 May 1960. New York, Carnegie Recital Hall, Composers’ Laboratory. Isca Sanders (mezzo soprano) and Toshi Ichiyanagi (piano) performed A Flower and The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs in program shared with several composers and musicians (Dunn 1962, 21, 22; M. B. 1960).

10 May 1960 [according to Dunn 12 May]. Los Angeles, California, Plummer Park, Fiesta Hall, Southern California Chamber Music Society, Monday Evening Concerts. Cathy Berberian (mezzo soprano) performed Aria with Fontana Mix in shared program with music by Luciano Berio, Edgard VarŹse, Claude Debussy, Bruno Maderna, Sylvano Bussotti, Olivier Messiaen, and Pierre Boulez (Dunn 1962, 20).

13 May 1960 (evening). Cleveland, Ohio, Cleveland Museum of Art, Second May Festival of Contemporary Music, presented by the Musart Society of the Cleveland Museum of Art, Third Program. Performed with David Tudor (using a single piano, five amplifiers, four tape machines, five portable radios): Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) with Fontana Mix and WBAI (Cage) and Music Walk; Tudor performed Music for Amplified Toy Pianos, Winter Music, and Christian Wolff, For Pianist and For Piano with Preparations (Dunn 1962, 14, 31, 38).

14 May 1960. Ann Arbor, Michigan, University of Michigan. Performed with David Tudor: Indeterminacy: New Aspect of Form in Instrumental and Electronic Music with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Dunn 1962, 32; Mumma 1960).

16 May 1960. Ann Arbor, Michigan, University of Michigan. Performed with David Tudor, Music Walk (Dunn 1962, 42; Mumma 1960).

19 May 1960. Yellow Springs, Ohio, Antioch College, Auditorium. Performed with David Tudor: Indeterminacy: New Aspect of Form in Instrumental and Electronic Music with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor, piano) (presumably afternoon, “public assemble lecture”); Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra with Fontana Mix and Music Walk; Tudor performed Music for Amplified Toy Pianos, Winter Music, and Christian Wolff, For Piano with Preparations, For Pianist (evening) (Dunn 1962, 14, 32, 38, 42; Markgraf 1962; McGary 1960a).

26 May 1960. Palo Alto, California, Stanford University. Terry Riley and La Monte Young performed Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 14).

Early June 1960. New York, New School for Social Research. Taught courses in mushroom identification (five field trips), music of Virgil Thomson, and experimental composition (twice weekly) (Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 40).

9 June 1960 [Dunn gives 15 June]. New York, Living Theatre, directed by Julian Beck and Judith Malina. In shared program, first performance of Music for The Marrying Maiden, as incidental music to the play, The Marrying Maiden, by Jackson Mac Low; subsequently forty-seven performances through 25 April 1961 (Dunn 1962, 40).

15 June 1960. Cologne, Atelier Mary Bauermeister. David Tudor performed Variations I and Water Music (Dunn 1962, 29, 43; Zahn 1993).

17-19 June 1960. Cologne, Atelier Mary Bauermeister. Nam June Paik performed his Hommage ą John Cage; Cage’s attendance uncertain (Herzogenrath 1976, 18; Herzogenrath and Lueg 1986; Sohm 1970).

29-30 June 1960. Stony Point, New York. Wrote directions for reproduction of Concert for Piano and Orchestra, parts for violin 1, violin 3, viola 1, and violoncello (29 June); parts for violin 2, viola 2, and trombone (30 June).

July 1960. Stony Point, New York. Composed Cartridge Music and Solo for Voice 2.

4 July 1960. Stony Point, New York. Wrote directions for reproduction of Music for Carillon No. 1, [graph version], Six Melodies for Violin and Keyboard, and Suite for Toy Piano.

Between July 1960 and 1962. Recorded Cartridge Music with David Tudor (Cage 1962d).

30 July 1960. Kentfield, California, Halprin Outdoor Theater. La Monte young performed Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 15).

12 August 1960 (afternoon). Lenox, Massachusetts, Tanglewood Berkshire Music Center, Chamber Music Hall, Tanglewood Berkshire Festival, Seminar in Contemporary Music, presented under the auspices of the Fromm Music Foundation. Introduced by Aaron Copland, conducted Concert for Piano and Orchestra, performed by John Perras (flute), Jerome Rosen (clarinet), Lenox String Quartet (Peter Marsh, Theodora Mantz, violins; Scott Nickrenz, viola; Donald McCall, violoncello) with first performance of Solo for Voice 2, given by Marguerite Willauer (soprano), presented as Concert for Voice, Flute, Clarinet, and Strings; performed with Paul Jacobs: Indeterminacy: New Aspect of Form in Instrumental and Electronic Music with Winter Music (Jacobs [possibly replaced by David Tudor]); Lenox String Quartet performed 26'1.1499" for a String Player (string quartet version) presented as 6'52.119" for String Players and String Quartet in Four Parts (Dunn 1962, 14, 24, 27, 31; Perkins 1960).

12 August 1960. Stratford, Ontario, Stratford Festival, International Conference of Composers. In shared program of electronic music, Cathy Berberian performed Aria with Fontana Mix (Dunn 1992, 20; Frankenstein 1960a).

15 August 1960. New London, Connecticut, Connecticut College for Women, School of Dance, Little Concert Lecture Series. In program shared with Jack Behrens and moderated by Norman Lloyd, previewed program of 19-20 August 1960 (Beiswanger 1960).

19 August 1960 or earlier. Arranged Arrangement of Conlon Nancarrow’s Studies for player piano [nos. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7].

19-20 August 1960. New London, Connecticut, Connecticut College for Women, Frank Loomis Palmer Auditorium, Thirteenth American Dance Festival (18-21 August). Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, presented Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano, Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 (as Rhythm Studies, later numbering No. 1, 2, 4, 7, 6) to Crises (first performance, tape); conducted American Dance Festival Orchestra in Christian Wolff, Music for Merce Cunningham to Rune (19 August); performed with Robert Dunn, from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five (20 August, matinee); Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Dunn?) (Dunn 1962, 13; Mumma 1976; Mumma 1977; Musical America 1960).

Circa 1960-1962. Oneonta, New York, State University College of Education. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Winter Music to Aeon; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies No. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 for Player Piano to Crises (tape); Concert for Piano and Orchestra [Cage at tape machines: WBAI?] to Antic Meet.

24-27 August 1960. Contemporary Arts Association Festival of New Music. Amores (I and IV) performed (Elmer Schoettle); The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs presented (as a recording) (25 August); First Construction (in Metal) presented as a recording (26 August); Fontana Mix, Concert for Piano and Orchestra and Imaginary Landscape No. 1 presented as recordings (27 August); all presentations by Peter Yates.

Late August 1960. Began concert tour to Europe with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company.

15 September 1960. Bremen, Radio Bremen. Performed with David Tudor: Cartridge Music (first performance), and WBAI with Fontana Mix and with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor, piano); Christian Wolff, Duo for Pianists I (two performances) (Anonymous 1982BIOGRAPHISCHES, 69; Dunn 1962, 32, 34).

20-21 September 1960 (late afternoon). Venice, Accademia di Belle Arti, Studio of Guido Cadorin, Tre Manifestationi di Musica d’Oggi (20-22 September). Performed with David Tudor, Cornelius Cardew, Kurt Schwertsik, and Frank Amey and assistants: Variations I (Cage and Tudor, pianos); Variations I (Cardew, guitar, and Schwertsik, French horn); Variations I (Amey, piano, and assistants, version for prepared piano and tape) (20 September); Indeterminacy: New Aspect of Form in Instrumental and Electronic Music with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) (21 September) (Cardew 1972; Dunn 1962, 29, 32; Thoresby 1960).

21 September 1960. Warsaw, Warsaw Autumn. Fontana Mix (tape) presented.

24 September 1960. Venice, Teatro La Fenice, La Biennale di Venezia, XXIII Festival Internazionale di Musica Contemporanea. Performed with David Tudor, Carolyn Brown, and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Two, Music Walk to Music Walk with Dancers; Variations I (without dance); Winter Music (without dance); Lavish Escapade (Tudor); Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor); Earle Brown, Hands Birds; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano 2 to Waka; Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor) (Delden 1960; Dunn 1962, 13, 14, 29, 42; Thomson 1960b; Thoresby 1960; Time 1960b; Vice 1960).

28-30 September 1960 (evenings). Berlin, Hebbel-Theater, 10. Berliner Festwochen (18 September-4 October), Gastspiel. Performed (on two pianos) with David Tudor, Carolyn Brown, and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Two, Variations I, Winter Music, Music Walk as Music Walk with Dancers; Christian Wolff, For Piano II to Lavish Escapade; Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor); Earle Brown, unidentified piece; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Waka; Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor) (Berliner Montagsecho 1960; Dempe 1960; Dunn 1962, 13, 14, 29, 42; FR 1960; G.Z. 1960; Geitel and Joachim 1960; Helm 1960; Kaul 1960; Koegler 1960; Kurier 1960; Mando 1960; Mühlberg 1960; National-Zeitung 1960; Oehlmann 1960; Prilipp 1960; Rauschning 1960; Thorausch 1993; W. N. 1960).

30 September 1960. Cologne, Westdeutscher Rundfunk, performed with David Tudor (radio performance): Cartridge Music, Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 15, 34).

2-3 October 1960. Munich, Kammerspiele. Performed with David Tudor, Carolyn Brown, and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Two, Extended Moment; Variations I, Winter Music, Music Walk with Dancers; Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 13, 14, 29, 42; Kaiser, J. 1960; Wied 1960; Wismeyer 1960).

5 October 1960. Cologne, Friedrich Wilhelm-Gymnasium. Performed with David Tudor, Carolyn Brown, and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Two, Winter Music, Music Walk with Dancers; Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 13, 14, 42; Herzogenrath and Lueg 1986, 156-159; Thorausch 1993; Unger 1960).

6 October 1960. Cologne, Atelier Mary Bauermeister. Performed Solo for Voice 2 with Cartridge Music, performed by Cornelius Cardew, Hans G Helms, Mauricio Kagel, Benjamin Patterson, Kurt Schwertsik, David Tudor and Christian Wolff; Tudor performed Music for Amplified Toy Pianos; Nam June Paik performed Etude for Piano Forte (involving cutting Cage’s necktie and shampooing him without advance warning); performance of La Monte Young, Poem; Karlheinz Stockhausen in attendance (Block, R. 1980, 121; Cage 1981i, [8]; Cage 1993d, 154-155; Cage/Raymond and Roberts 1980, 6; Dunn 1962, 34, 38; Gardner 1982; Herzogenrath 1976, 18; Thorausch 1993; Zahn 1993; Vinton 1974, 551).

8-10 October 1960. Stockholm. Performed with David Tudor: Cartridge Music (8 October, Sveriges Radio); Cartridge Music, WBAI with Fontana Mix and with Concert for Piano and Orchestra, presented as Solo for Piano with Fontana Mix, and Indeterminacy: New Aspect of Form in Instrumental and Electronic Music with Concert for Piano and Orchestra, presented as Solo for Piano with Lecture: Indeterminacy (10 October, Moderna Museet, Fylkingen) (Berg, C. 1960; Dunn 1962, 31, 32, 34; Fahlström 1960; Gorm 1960; Hellqvist 1960; Wiggen 1960).

November 1960. Middletown, Connecticut. Assisted with copying parts for opera, Ikon (Richard Winslow and Ralph Pendleton).

November 1960. Middletown, Connecticut. Wrote Remarks on Theatre Song and Ikon [text].

2-5 November 1960. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, ’92 Theater. First performances of Theater Song and Ikon by Richard K. Winslow (music) and Ralph Pendleton (libretto); Cage had assisted in copying the score for Ikon the previous week (Middletown Press 1960).

7 November 1960. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, ’92 Theater. Taught freshmen class on experimental music using La Monte Young, Poem for Chairs, Tables, Benches, and Other Sound Sources, etc. (Ahles 1960; Mani 1960; Sommer, J.G. 1960).

13 November 1960 (afternoon). Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, John Wes, Fall House Parties. Gave concert (Mani 1960; Wesleyan Argus 1960).

8 November 1960. Barcelona, Club 49, Sala de Audiciones. David Tudor performed Winter Music, Variations I (Dunn 1962, 14, 29).

10 November 1960. Madrid, International Institute. David Tudor performed Winter Music, Variations I (Dunn 1962, 14, 29).

18 November 1960. Copenhagen, Danmarks Radio. David Tudor performed Variations I (Dunn 1962, 29).

28 November 1960 (from late afternoon). New York, Living Theatre (530 Avenue of the Americas). Benefit party celebrating the one thousandth performance at the Living Theatre; with others, Cage was in the anniversary committee.

30 November 1960. New York, Rockefeller Institute, Caspary Auditorium (York Avenue at 66th Street), presented by Contemporary Music Society. Music for The Marrying Maiden presented as Interludes from The Marrying Maiden in concert of electronic music including music by Henk Badings, Richard Maxfield, Henry Brant, and Alwin Nikolais (Dunn 1962, 40; Eyer 1960; Hughes, A. 1960).

12 December 1960. Paris, UNESCO, Festival of Avant-Garde. Cathy Berberian performed Aria with Fontana Mix (Dunn 1962, 20).

January 1961. New York, WBAI [radio station]. Performed with David Tudor: Communication with WBAI (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 41).

January 1961. Middletown, Connecticut. Transcribed Music for Carillon No. 3 for two-octave instrument.

7-8 January 1961 (evenings). New York, Yoko Ono’s Studio (112 Chambers Street). Attended one or both concerts, organized by La Monte Young, with music by Toshi Ichiyanagi; performed by Bob Dunn, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Kenji Kobayashi, Jackson Mac Low, Richard Maxfield, Toshiro Mayuzumi, Simone Morris, Yoko Ono, David Tudor, and La Monte Young.

9 January 1961. Brooklyn, New York, Pratt Institute of Technology, Evening School. Gave first performance (with tapes) of Where Are We Going? And What Are We Doing? (Cage 1961h, 194; Dunn 1962, 43).

February 1961. Wrote Lecture on Commitment (completed 21 February) and On Robert Rauschenberg, Artist, and His Work [texts].

February-March 1961. Middletown, Connecticut. Composed Variations II.

23 February 1961 (evening). Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, Alpha Delta Phi, Ninth Annual Twentieth Century Symposium: Commitment (22-24 February), presented by Beta Theta Pi in cooperation with the faculty and students of Wesleyan University. Moderated by Edward Williamson, presented Lecture on Commitment (Cage 1967h; Markgraf 1962, 134; Wesleyan Argus 1961).

11 February 1961 (matinee). De Kalb, Illinois, Northern Illinois Teachers College. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 32).

11 February 1961 (evening). De Kalb, Illinois, Northern Illinois University, University Auditorium. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano Nos. 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 to Crises (tape); WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 13).

14 February 1961. Lynchburg, Virginia, Randolph-Macon Woman’s College, Smith Memorial Hall, Fine Arts Series. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Comapny: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano Nos. 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 to Crises (tape); WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 13, 32).

15 February 1961. Macon, Georgia, Wesleyan College, Porter Family Memorial Auditorium, Tenth Annual Arts Festival (15-18 February). Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano Nos. 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 to Crises (tape); WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 13, 32 [error]).

18 February 1961. University Park, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania State University, Schwab Auditorium, Artists Series. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet; Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano Nos. 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 to Crises (tape) (Dunn 1962, 13).

21 February 1961. Wrote or completed Lecture on Commitment.

22 February 1961. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Plays and Players Theatre (1714 Delancey Street), presented by the Dance Committee of the Philadelphia Art Alliance. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet; Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano Nos. 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 to Crises (tape) (Dunn 1962, 13, 32).

23 February 1961. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, Beta Symposium. Performed Lecture on Commitment.

March 1961. Middletown, Connecticut. Revised Music for Carillon No. 1 (graph version).

5 March 1961. Middletown, Connecticut. Revised Music for Carillon No. 1 (transcriptions for two-octave and three-octave instrument).

11 March 1961. Delaware, Ohio, Ohio Wesleyan University, Gray Chapel, Arts Symposium (9-12 March). Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet; Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano Nos. 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 to Crises (tape); preceded by lecture and masterclass by Merce Cunningham (morning and afternoon) (Dunn 1962, 13; Kelly, J. 1961; Wells 1961).

20 March 1961. Durham, North Carolina, Duke University, Page Auditorium, Duke University Young Artists Series. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet; Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano Nos. 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 to Crises (tape) (Dunn 1962, 13, 32).

24 March 1961. New York, New School for Social Research, Auditorium. David Tudor, piano and live electronics, gave first performance of Variations II; program included music by Hans Otte, Tropismen; Richard Maxfield, Piano Concert; Roland Kayn, Quanten (Dunn 1962, 29; Ericson 1961b; Perkins 1961).

Spring 1961. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, Center for Advanced Studies. Interviewed by Bruce Markgraf (Markgraf 1962, 128n).

April 1961. Middletown, Connecticut. Composed Music for Carillon No. 4, the first work composed by superimposing tracing paper on pages of an astronomical atlas, tracing the stars and translating them into musical notation, as well as a transcription for a three-octave instrument.

April 1961. Padua, Teatro Verdi. Heinz-Klaus Metzger and Sylvano Bussotti, pianists, performed Variations I.

12 April 1961. Cortland, New York, State University College of Education. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; and WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 13, 32).

14 April 1961. Burlington, Vermont, University of Vermont, Southwick Auditorium. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 69-84 with David Tudor, to Suite for Five, and WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor, piano) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 13, 32).

16 April 1961. Urbana, Illinois, University of Illinois, Smith Music Hall. David Tudor performed For Paul Taylor and Anita Dencks during lecture-demonstration (twice, afternoon and evening) (Dunn 1962, 7).

17 April 1961. Dixon Hall Lounge, Fine Arts Festival, Experiments in Sound. Ellsworth Snyder performed Suite for Toy Piano, A Valentine out of Season, A Flower (with Helen Hamm, voice); Williams Mix presented, as well as performances and presentations of music by Charles Hamm, Walter Jenkins, Ellsworth Snyder, Karlheinz Stockhausen.

18 April 1961. Urbana, Illinois, University of Illinois, Lincoln Hall Theatre, 1961 Festival of Contemporary Arts. Dorothy Clark, Katherine Litz, James Knapp, William Miller, George Talbot, David Tudor (piano), Willis Ward, and Alan Thomas, co-ordinator, performed Theatre Piece (Dunn 1962, 42).

20 April 1961. New York, Museum of Modern Art, Composers’ Showcase. Performed Cartridge Music with David Tudor (American premiŹre); Tudor performed Variations II and 34'46.776" for Two Pianists and String Player, with Toshi Ichiyanagi (31'57.9864" for a Pianist) and Kenji Kobayashi, violin (26'1.1499" for a String Player); public conversation with Charles Schwartz following the concert (Dunn 1962, 27, 29, 34; Ericson 1961a).

25 April 1961. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, Ninety-Two Theatre. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor, piano part) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 13, 32).

Circa 25 April 1961. Middletown Connecticut, Wesleyan University. David Tudor performed Variations II (Dunn 1962, 29).

4 May 1961 (evening). Bremen, Altes Rathaus, Obere Halle, Pro Musica Nova (2-6 May), Die neue Komponistengeneration. Music for Carillon No. 1, Music for Carillon No. 2, and possibly Music for Carillon No. 4 performed (this would have been the first known performance).

7 May 1961. San Antonio, Texas, McNay Art Institute. Robert Sheff (piano) and Chris Pappas (violin) performed from Sonatas and Interludes (nine sonatas and two interludes), from Six Melodies (three only), and Variations I (presumably on two pianos) (Dunn 1962, 18, 23, 29).

Prior to 14 May 1961. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, Center for Advanced Studies. Interviewed for Register Magazine (Register Magazine 1961).

14 May 1961. New York, Carnegie Recital Hall. Toshi Ichiyanagi performed Winter Music; Christian Wolff, For Prepared Piano; La Monte Young, 566 to Henry Flint; Earle Brown, from Folio; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano #4 and Music for Piano # 6; Stefan Wolpe, Form; music by Richard Maxfield; Feldman, Piano Piece 1952; Cage presumably in attendance.

20 May 1961. Zagreb, Muzički Biennale (17-24 May), Koncertni Studio Istra. David Tudor, piano, Ensemble für Neue Musik Köln, Mauricio Kagel, conductor, performed Concert for Piano and Orchestra in shared program with music by Cornelius Cardew, Mauricio Kagel, and Arnold Schoenberg (Dunn 1962, 31; Helm 1961; Kučera 1961; Reisinger 1961).

21 May 1961. Oyster Bay, New York, First Presbyterian Church. Grace di Battista, soprano, Ellen Cone, actress, Kathryn Deguire, housewife, William Deguire, pianist, Charles Hepburn, Jr., painter, performed Theatre Piece (Dunn 1962, 42).

June 1961. Middletown, Connecticut. Commissioned by Pierre Mercure (1927-1966) for the Montreal Festivals Society, began Atlas Eclipticalis (Cage 1986e; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 40).

June-July 1961. Middletown, Connecticut and New London, Connecticut. Composed Atlas Eclipticalis (violin 7, 8, 21, viola 1, violoncello 1, contrabass 1, flute 1, oboe 1, clarinet 2, 3, bassoon 2, horn 2, trumpet 2, trombone 2, tuba 3, timpani 2, percussion 1, 9, harp 3).

June-21 July 1961. Middletown, Connecticut and New London, Connecticut. Composed Atlas Eclipticalis (general directions, directions for percussion and directions for conductor and assistant).

June-August 1961. Middletown, Connecticut, New London, Connecticut, and Edisto Beach, South Carolina. Composed Atlas Eclipticalis (violin 10, 11, 22, viola 7, 9, violoncello 3, 4).

June-September 1961, Middletown, Connecticut and Edisto Beach, South Carolina. Composed Atlas Eclipticalis (violin 17).

June-September 1961. Middletown, Connecticut and Stony Point, New York. Composed Atlas Eclipticalis (viola 3, 4).

June-December 1961. Middletown, Connecticut and New London, Connecticut. Composed Atlas Eclipticalis (violin 2-4, 6).

June-December 1961. Middletown, Connecticut and Stony Point, New York. Composed Atlas Eclipticalis (violin 14, 16, 18, 19, 23, 24, viola 2, 8, oboe 2, 3, clarinet 1, bassoon 1, 3, horn 1, 3, 4, 5, trumpet 1, 3, trombone 1, 3, timpani 1, 3, percussion 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, harp 1, 2).

June 1961-January 1962. Middletown, Connecticut and Stony Point, New York. Composed Atlas Eclipticalis (violin 1, 5, 9, 12, 13, 15, 20, viola 5, 6, violoncello 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, contrabass 2, 3, flute 2, 3, tuba 1, 2).

4 June 1961. New York, AG Gallery (925 Madison Avenue and 73rd Street), Festival of Electronic Music, presented by Musica Antiqua et Nova (March-July). Fontana Mix, Music for The Marrying Maiden, and Williams Mix presented (Dunn 1962, 40, 41; Sohm 1970).

Prior to 16 June 1961. Paris, Club d’Essai de la R.T.F. David Tudor performed La Monte Young, 343 for Henry Flynt; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano No. 4, and unknown compositions by Cage (Samuel 1961).

20 June 1961. Paris, American Embassy Theatre. David Tudor, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Niki de Saint Phalle performed Variations II; Cage presumably not in attendance (Cross 1974, 769; Dunn 1962, 29).

July 1961. Near Innsbruck. Peter Greenham and Lilly Greenham, Kurt Schwertsik and Christian Wolff performed Variations I (Dunn 1962, 29).

3-8 August 1961. Montréal, Québec, ThéČtre La Comédie Canadienne, International Week of Today’s Music = Semaine internationale de musique actuelle, under the auspices of the Société des Festivals de Montréal. Invited by Pierre Mercure, attended; with Toshi Ichiyanagi (assistant to the conductor), David Tudor, the Festival Orchestra (Matthew Raimondi, violin; Otto Joachim, viola; Walter Joachim, violoncello; Nathalie C. Feldman, contrabass; Philip Dunnigan, flute; Rafael Masella and Jean Lafontaine, clarinets; Rodolfo Masella, bassoon; Howard Hillyer, French horn; Marcel Lévźque, trumpet; Joseph Zuskin, trombone; Robert Ryker, tuba; Antonio Romandini, guitar [sic]; Louis Charbonneau, timpani; Yvan Landry, vibraphone; Guy Lachapelle, percussion; Marie Iosch, harp) and Merce Cunningham Dance Company gave first performances of Atlas Eclipticalis (version with seventeen instruments and contact microphones) (as conductor) with Winter Music (electronic version, Tudor) to Aeon (3 [concert performance] and 5 August [dance performance]); performed (with tapes) Where Are We Going? And What Are We Doing? (8 August, McGill University, Redpath Hall); interviewed by Claude Gingras (Bernier et al. 1976; Cage/Gingras 1961; Canby 1961; Cross, L.M. 1974, 769; Dunn 1962, 30; Gingras 1961a; Gingras 1961b; Kyle 1962; McLean, E. 1961; Pépin 1961; Rich 1961; Rivest 1997a; Rivest 1997b; Rivest 1998; Vallerand 1961; Vineberg 1961).

10 August 1961. New York, PM East television. Performed with David Tudor, Cartridge Music, Variations II (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 29, 34).

17 August 1961. New London, Connecticut, Connecticut College for Women, School of the Dance, Palmer Auditorium, American Dance Festival (17-20 August). Performed with Richard Maxfield (assistant to the conductor), David Tudor, the Festival Orchestra and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Atlas Eclipticalis (as conductor) with Winter Music (electronic version, Tudor) to Aeon and repertory pieces (Dunn 1962, 30; Schumann 1962; Terry, W. 1961).

25 August 1961. Osaka, Festival of Contemporary Music. Toshi Ichiyanagi (piano) and the Festival Orchestra, Toshiro Mayuzumi (conductor) performed Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Dunn 1962, 31).

September 1961. Stony Point, New York. Revised Atlas Eclipticalis (trumpet 2).

Early September 1961. Darmstadt, Internationale Ferienkurse für Neue Musik. David Tudor performed with Christoph Caskel, Carla Henius, and Kenji Kobayashi: The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs (with Henius); 34'46.776" for a Pianist (Tudor) and 26'1.1499" for a String Player (Kobayashi, violin) as 26'55.988" for Pianist and String Player (6 September); Christian Wolff and Michael von Biel performed Cartridge Music, as Piano Duet; Cage not in attendance (Dunn 1962, 22, 27, 34; Kyle 1962; Trumpff 1961).

September 1961. Visited Japan privately with Peggy Guggenheim.

18 September 1961. Warsaw, Warsaw Autumn. Cathy Berberian performed Aria with Fontana Mix (Dunn 1962, 20).

October 1961. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University. Performed Where Are We Going? And What Are We Doing? (Dunn 1962, 43; Everett 1961).

6 October 1961. Salvador, Brazil, Universidade da Bahia. David Tudor performed Variations I (Dunn 1962, 29).

13-14 October 1961. Cologne. David Tudor (piano) and Kenji Kobayashi (violin) performed 34'46.776" for a Pianist with 26'1.1499" for a String Player, presented as 26'55.988" for Pianist and String Player (13 October, Westdeutscher Rundfunk; 14 October, Atelier Mary Bauermeister) (Charles 1978, 123; Dunn 1962, 27).

26 October 1961. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University Press: Silence published (Kyle 1962; Cage 1961h, iv).

28 October 1961 (evening). Oldenburg, Schloßtheater, Musica Viva-Konzerte, in collaboration with Radio Bremen (Hans Otte). In shared program with music by Juan Allende-Blin, Franco Evangelisti, Mauricio Kagel and Hans Otte, the Kölner Ensemble für Neue Musik, Mauricio Kagel, conductor, performed Double Music (Dunn 1962, 35).

6 November 1961. New York, Living Theatre. Performed Where Are We Going? And What Are We Doing? (Dunn 1962, 43; Parmenter 1961).

Between 12-18 November 1961. Boston, Massachusetts. Performed with Merce Cunningham in dance demonstration (Boston Sunday Globe 1961).

November-December 1961. Wrote instructions for copyist concerning Three Pieces for Flute Duet.

4 December 1961 (evening). Ann Arbor, Michigan, Ann Arbor High School, presented by the Dramatic Arts Center. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five, and WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 13, 32).

5 December 1961. Detroit, Michigan, Detroit Institute of Arts Auditorium, Detroit Institute of Arts Concert Series. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five, and WBAI (tape machines) with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies for Player Piano No. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 7 to Crises (tape) (Dunn 1962, 13, 32).

10 December 1961 (late afternoon-early evening). Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, Memorial Chapel. Presumably attended Candlelight Concert given by the Wesleyan University Glee Club and Chapel Choir, Richard K. Winslow, director.

16 December 1961. Perugia, Universitą Italiana per Stranieri, Aula Magna, Cathy Berberian and Luciano Berio performed and presented Aria with Fontana Mix, A Flower, and The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs, as well as music by Bruno Maderna, Sylvano Bussotti, Luciano Berio, Valentino Bucchi, Aldo Clementi, and Luigi Nono.

Late 1961. Cage, always an avid mushroom hunter, with Lois Long, Esther Dam, Guy G. Nearing and Ralph Ferrara founded the New York Mycological Society (New Yorker 1989; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 40).

Prior to or during 1962. Performed (piano) and conducted Manhattan Percussion Ensemble in recording performances of Amores, Double Music and William Russell, Three Dance Movements.

January 1962. Stony Point, New York. Completed Atlas Eclipticalis.

8-9 January 1962. South Hadley, Massachusetts, Mount Holyoke College, Arts in Performance. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five, and Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) with WBAI (Cage, tape machines) to Antic Meet, as well as Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies No. 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 6 to Crises (8 January, Chapin Auditorium); read “Experimental Music”; Tudor performed Variations II (9 January, Chapin Auditorium); Cunningham gave master dance class (8 January, Kendall Hall) (Dunn 1962, 13, 29, 32).

10 January 1962. Plymouth, New Hampshire, Plymouth State Teachers College. Performed with David Tudor, and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five (Dunn 1962, 13).

11 January 1962. Springvale, Maine, Nasson College. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five, and Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) with WBAI (Cage, tape machines) to Antic Meet, as well as Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies No. 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 6 to Crises (tape) (Dunn 1962, 13, 32).

22 January 1962. Minneapolis, Minnesota, First Unitarian Society. David Tudor performed Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra, presented as Solo for Piano with Lecture: Indeteminacy (on tape?) (Dunn 1962, 32; Cross 1974, 769).

2 February 1962 (evening). Munich, Künstlerhaus, Festsaal (Lenbachplatz), Konzerte für Moderne Musik, Neue Musik III. In shared program given by the Kölner Ensemble für Neue Musik, Mauricio Kagel, conductor, with music by Cornelius Cardew and Mauricio Kagel, Siegfried Rockstroh, percussion, using magnetic tape prepared by Mauricio Kagel, gave first performance of 27'10.554" for a Percussionist, as 7'7.614" for a Percussionist; the ensemble (Kagel, prepared piano, Rockstroh, and Karlheinz Böttner, percussion) also performed Amores (Dunn 1962, 27, 34; Lohmüller 1962).

7-8 February 1962. Boulder, Colorado, University of Colorado. Performed with David Tudor: five compositions, among which Cartridge Music and presumably La Monte Young, [Integer to Henry Flint] (7 February, UMC Forum Room); Where Are We Going? And What Are We Doing? (Cage, with tapes, 8 February, presumably canceled); Tudor performed Variations II (piano with electronics); Bo Nilsson, Bewegungen, Schlagfiguren, and Quantitäten; Hans Otte, Tropismen (8 February, morning, College of Music) (Colorado Daily 1962; Dunn 1962, 29, 34, 43; Page, A. 1962).

9 February 1962. Denver, Colorado, East High School. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) with WBAI (Cage, tape machines) to Antic Meet, as well as Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies No. 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 6 to Crises (tape) (Dunn 1962, 15, 32).

9-18 February 1962 (actually 9-11 and 16-18 February) [original program does not mention Music for Wind Instruments]. Ann Arbor, Michigan, First Unitarian Church (1917 Washtenaw Avenue), ONCE: A Festival of Contemporary Music, presented by the Dramatic Arts Center. ONCE Chamber Ensemble performed Atlas Eclipticalis (10 February); Dorian Woodwind Quintet: John Perras, flute; David Perkett, oboe; Arthur Bloom, clarinet; Jane Taylor, bassoon; William Brown, horn, gave first complete performance of Music for Wind Instruments (17 February) (Dunn 1962, 24; Melos 1962).

14 February 1962. Cheney, Washington, Eastern Washington State College, Showalter Auditorium, Student-Community Artist Series. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) with WBAI (Cage, tape machines) to Antic Meet; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies No. 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 6 to Crises (tape) (Dunn 1962, 15, 32).

14 February 1962. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University. Ensemble of seven players, chronomoter instead of conductor, Christian Wolff, assistant to the conductor, performed Atlas Eclipticalis; David Behrman and Wolff performed Cartridge Music as Piano Duet (Dunn 1962, 30, 34).

16 February 1962. Vancouver, British Columbia, University of British Columbia, University Auditorium. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham Dance Company: WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet; Winter Music (piano and electronics) to Aeon (Dunn 1962, 15, 32).

21 February 1962. Sacramento, California. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five and Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies No. 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 6 to Crises (tape) (morning, River Playhouse); Winter Music to Aeon; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies No. 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 6 to Crises (tape) (afternoon, Sacramento State College, Little Theater) (Dunn 1962, 13, 15).

22 February 1962. Davis, University of California, Memorial Union Assembly Hall. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: conducted unidentified chamber orchestra performing Atlas Eclipticalis with Winter Music (Tudor, piano and electronics) to Aeon; WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor, piano) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 30, 32).

23-24 February 1962. Berkeley, University of California. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five (23 February); WBAI, simultaneously with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor, piano), to Antic Meet (23-24 February); Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon (24 February) (Dunn 1962, 13, 15, 32).

26 February 1962 (evening). Los Angeles, University of California, Royce Hall. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon [presumably replacing Music for Piano to Suite for Five and Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies No. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 for Player Piano to Crises (tape)] and WBAI (tape machines) with Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 15, 32).

28 February 1962. Palo Alto, California, Stanford University, Memorial Auditorium. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: Winter Music to Aeon; WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 15, 32).

2 March 1962. Los Angeles, California, Immaculate Heart College. Introduced by Peter Yates (also in six previous lectures), lectured; read from interview with Roger Reynolds; explained compositional techniques; answering questions from students (afternoon) (Comment 1962; Yates 1962a).

5 March 1962. Los Angeles, California, Plummer Park, Fiesta Hall, Monday Evening Concerts, Tenth Program, sponsored by California Chamber Music Society. In shared program performed with David Tudor and ad hoc ensemble (Gretel Shanley, flute; David Duke, horn; Lester Remsen, trumpet; Miles Anderson, trombone; John T. Johnson, tuba; Dorothy Remsen, harp; William Kraft, timpani; Robert Winslow, percussion; Robert Sonner, percussion; Charlotte Motley, violin; Marvin Chantry, viola; Tom D. Perdini, contrabass), Atlas Eclipticalis (conductor, with Gerald Strang, assistant to the conductor) with Winter Music (electronic version, Tudor); Christian Wolff, For 6 or 7 Players (conducted by Cage), Duet II (James Decker and Tudor), For Pianist (Tudor) (Dunn 1962, 30; Goldberg, A. 1962; Russell, S. 1962; Yates 1962a).

6 March 1962. Riverside, California, University of California. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; Winter Music to Aeon; WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 13, 15, 32).

7 March 1962. Claremont, California, Pomona College, Bridges Hall. Performed with David Tudor: Where Are We Going? And What Are We Doing? (alone); Variations II (Tudor); informal discussion afterwards (Wig Lounge) (Barnes, R. 1966; Dunn 1962, 29, 43).

9 March 1962 (evening). Northridge, California, San Fernando Valley State College, Music Building, Choir Room. Performed with David Tudor: Where Are We Going? And What Are We Doing? (alone, with tapes) and Cartridge Music (Dunn 1962, 34, 43; Valley State Sundial 1962; Yates 1962a).

17 March 1962. Boston, Massachusetts, John Hancock Hall. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham; conducted Atlas Eclipticalis, performed by unidentified chamber orchestra with Winter Music (Tudor) (piano and electronics) to Aeon; WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 30, 32).

21 March 1962. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, University of Pittsburgh. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet; Winter Music to Aeon (Dunn 1962, 15, 32).

24 March 1962. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Alverno College, organized by the Society of Fine Arts. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: WBAI (tape machines) with Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet; Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies No. 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 6 to Crises (tape) (Dunn 1962, 15, 32).

30-31 March 1962. Hempstead, Long Island, New York, Hofstra College, Playhouse, Hofstra College Playhouse Series. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, probably conducted ad hoc chamber orchestra in Atlas Eclipticalis with Winter Music performed by David Tudor (electronic version) to Aeon (30 March, uncertain); WBAI (tape machines) with Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet; Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies No. 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 6 to Crises (tape) (31 March) (Dunn 1962, 30, 32).

4 April 1962. New York, Young Men’s-Young Women’s Hebrew Association, Theresa L. Kaufmann Concert Hall. Performed with David Tudor and Jill Johnston: Music Walk, presented as Music Walk with Dancer (Dunn 1962, 42; Time 1962).

10 April 1962 (evening). Ithaca, New York, Cornell University, Alice Statler Auditorium, 16th Festival of Contemporary Arts, sponsored by the Program Council of Willard Straight Hall. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five, and WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet; reception afterwards at Willard Straight Hall, Memorial Room (Dunn 1962, 13, 32).

14 April 1962. Princeton, New Jersey, Mc Carter Theatre. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five, and WBAI with Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (Dunn 1962, 13, 32).

14 April 1962. Venice, Teatro La Fenice, La Biennale di Venezia. Frederic Rzewski performed Music of Changes [part I] (Dunn 1962, 9).

1 May 1962. Oakland, California, Mills College, Concert Hall, California Composers Forum. Luciano Berio, Patricia Caballero, Tom Constanten, Maxine Goldberg, Jane Hill, Ronald Hotek, Robert Kuykendall, Irene Lathrop, Philip Lesh, Robert L. Moran, Nancy Thalhammer, Lillian T’seng, Ann Uran, performed Winter Music (version for thirteen pianos) (Dunn 1962, 15).

7 May 1962. San Antonio, Texas, McNay Art Institute. Chris Pappas, violin, gave (presumably) first performance of 59 1/2" for a String Player (Dunn 1962, 26).

9 May 1962. Chicago, Illinois, Arts Club of Chicago. Cathy Berberian performed Aria with Fontana Mix and (with Luciano Berio) The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs (Dunn 1962, 20, 22).

14 May 1962. Ojai, California, Art Center, Ojai Festival. Cathy Berberian and Luciano Berio performed A Flower and The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs (Dunn 1962, 21, 22).

19 May 1962. Ojai, California, Ojai Festival Bowl, Ojai Festival. Cathy Berberian performed Aria with Fontana Mix; Luciano Berio and Lukas Foss performed Winter Music (Dunn 1962, 15, 20).

June 1962. Stony Point, New York. Walter Hinrichsen instigated the publication of a descriptive catalogue of Cage’s compositions published by Henmar Press, which was prepared by Robert Dunn (1928-1996). Cage wrote notes on the representative selection of about one hundred compositions from the music he had written to date and wrote a foreword to the catalogue, which was published in September 1962 (Dunn 1962; Gillespie 2012; Johnson, Thomas F. 1962).

2 June 1962. London, Wigmore Hall. Michael von Biel, Griffith Rose, Egon Mayer, Cornelius Cardew and Generation of Music 3 performed Variations I (Dunn 1962, 29).

Summer 1962. Copenhagen, Fluxus Festival. Cage’s attendance uncertain (Jensen, N.M. 1993).

6 July 1962. New York, Judson Memorial Church (55 Washington Square South), A Concert of Dance. Presented Cartridge Music (recording of a performance by Cage and David Tudor) perhaps used as an accompaniment to the dances, Isolations, by Carol Scothorn and Shoulder R, by Ruth Emerson (Dunn 1962, 34).

11 September 1962. Gent, Koninklijke Nederlandse Schouwburg, Festival van Vlaanderen (24 August-14 September) in conjunction with Internationaal Muziekfestival van Gent, Nieuwe Media in de Muziek. Cathy Berberian performed Aria with Fontana Mix.

14 September 1962. Wrote Remarks before a Visit to Japan (text).

26 September 1962. Seattle, Washington, Cornish School, Theatre: invited by Lockrem Johnson, performed with David Tudor, Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) with Fontana Mix (Cage, manipulation of 4 tape machines), Winter Music (electronic version, two pianos), Cartridge Music (4 tape machines and electronics) (Guzzo 1962a; Guzzo 1962b).

28 September 1962. Honolulu, Hawaii, University of Hawaii, Orvis Auditorium, presented by Jacob Feuerring. Performed with David Tudor, Winter Music (electronic version), Cartridge Music, Music Walk, and Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano No. 4 (Honolulu Advertiser 1962; Honolulu Star-Bulletin 1962).

5 October 1962. Palermo, 3rd Settimana di Musica Nuova. Atlas Eclipticalis performed; Cage not in attendance (Espresso 1962; Carter 1963; Manzoni 1963; Pizzuti 1962; Weissmann 1962; Weissmann 1963; Willnauer 1962).

Fall 1962. During six-week concert tour of Japan (Tokyo, Osaka, Kyoto, Sapporo), toured and performed with David Tudor, Toshi Ichiyanagi and Yoko Ono: Tokyo, NHK television (5 October); Tokyo, Ueno Bunkakakan (9-10 October); Kyoto, Ueno Bunkakaikan (12 October); Osaka, Mido-Kaikan: with Yoko Ono (voice) and David Tudor (piano) performed Aria, Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Solo for Piano), and Fontana Mix (performed simultaneously); David Tudor performed Karlheinz Stockhausen, Klavierstück X; David Tudor and Toshi Ichiyanagi performed Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano No. 7 (17 October); Tokyo (23 October); composed 0'00" (24-25 October, Tokyo); gave first performance of 0'00"; performed Variations II with David Tudor; David Tudor and Toshi Ichiyanagi performed Michael von Biel, Composition II for Two Pianos; David Tudor and Yuji Takahashi performed Toru Takemitsu, Corona for Pianists; David Tudor and Kenji Kobayashi (violin) performed Christian Wolff, Duo for Pianist and Violinist (24 October, Tokyo, Aoyama, Sogestu Art Center); performed in Sapporo (26 October, Citizens’ Kaikan; 27 October, NHK); performed Winter Music [version for four pianos]; composed Music for Piano 85 (Osaka, 13 October) (Adachi 2012; Cage 1963b; Cage 1967o, 30; Cage 1979c, 93; Fürst-Heidtmann 1979, 275; Ichiyanagi 1962a; Ichiyanagi 1962b; Ichiyanagi 1962c; Kostelanetz 1970d, illustrations 46, 48-50; Metzger, H.-K. and Riehn 1978[JOHN], 159; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 40).

December 1962-January 1963. Stony Point, New York. Composed Variations III.

Winter 1963. Honolulu, Hawaii, University of Hawaii, East-West Center. Invited by Fredric Lieberman lectured and attended with David Tudor and Peggy Guggenheim traveling back from Japan to the United States.

Circa 1963. Wrote A Movement, A Sound, A Change of Light [text].

1963. Wrote Where Do We Go from Here? (text); presumably wrote Present (text); made final corrections to Sonata for Clarinet.

1963. Munich. Attended Siemens-Studio für elektronische Musik.

14 January 1963 (evening). Newark, University of Delaware, Mitchell Hall, Artists Series. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) with WBAI (Cage) to Antic Meet; Winter Music (with Tudor) to Aeon; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies for Player Piano [sic] no. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 to Crises (tape).

21 January 1963. Berlin, Technische Universität, Kongreßhalle, Großer Saal, Musik im technischen Zeitalter. Performed with David Tudor: interviewed by Hans Heinz Stuckenschmidt as part of first performance of Variations III with Variations II with Fontana Mix (Tudor) (Berliner Zeitung 1963; Gillespie 2012; Illustrierte Berliner Zeitschrift 1963; Köhler 1963; Spiegel 1963; Stuckenschmidt 1979, 296-297).

5-6 February 1963 (evenings). Norton, Massachusetts, Wheaton College, Watson Hall Auditorium, Wheaton College Concert Series. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Winter Music to Aeon; Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Pierre Schaeffer, excerpts from Symphonie pour un homme seul (tape) to Collage I.

7 February 1963. New Britain, Connecticut, Central Connecticut State College. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Winter Music to Aeon; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies for Player Piano [sic] no. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 to Crises (tape); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet.

8 February 1963. Cologne, Westdeutscher Rundfunk, Funkhaus, Musik der Zeit. Mauricio Kagel, Heinz Bähr, and Siegfried Rockstroh performed Amores (Krellmann 1963a; Ky 1963; Rothärmel 1963a; Schab 1963c).

13 February 1963. Minneapolis, Minnesota, Woman’s Club of Minneapolis, presented by the Center Arts Council of Walker Arts Center. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 (with Tudor) and Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) with WBAI (Cage) to Antic Meet; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies for Player Piano [sic] no. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 to Crises (tape).

16 February 1963 (evening). Madison, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin Union Theater. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) with WBAI (Cage) to Antic Meet; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies for Player Piano [sic] no. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 to Crises (tape); Christian Wolff, Music for Merce Cunningham (with Tudor) to Rune.

17 February 1963 (evening). Ann Arbor, Michigan, Ann Arbor Community Center, Auditorium, ONCE Festival (9-10, 16-17 February), presented by the Dramatic Arts Center. In program shared with music by Robert Ashley (1930-2014), Robert Sheff, Philip Krumm, performed with David Tudor and ad hoc chamber orchestra, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Sapporo (conductor); Tudor performed Variations II (Kasemets 1963a; Kasemets 1963b).

15 March 1963. New York, New School for Social Research. David Tudor and Michael von Biel performed Cartridge Music as Piano Duet and Variations I.

8 April 1963 (evening). Dixon Hall Auditorium, An Evening of Music with John Cage and David Tudor, presented by music committee. Performed (conductor) with David Tudor (pianist and associate conductor) and Ann Marie Boldt (flute); Thomas Jones (clarinet); Ted Demuth (trombone); James Assenheimer (bass clarinet); James Drew (organ); John Joyce (timpani) and Charles Hamm (assistant to the conductor): Atlas Eclipticalis with Winter Music (electronic version); Toshi Ichiyanagi, Sapporo; Christian Wolff, For 5 or 10 Players (presumably first performance); followed by question period.

8 April 1963. Firenze. Sylvano Bussotti performed Cartridge Music.

18 April-2 June 1963. Washington, D.C., Washington Gallery of Modern Art, Alice Denney, curator, The Popular Image. Performed at opening (18 April?), Where Are We Going? And What Are We Doing? (with tapes) and Cartridge Music (Ahlander 1963).

2 May 1963 (evening). Vienna, Mozart-Saal, Musik der Gegenwart, organized by the Büro der Wiener Konzerthausgesellschaft: in program with music by Kurt Schwertsik, Michael von Biel, Christian Wolff (For 5 or 10 Players), performed with David Tudor (piano) and Michael von Biel (violoncello); Friedrich Cerha (violin); Jan Herlinger (flute); Josef Hummel (tuba); Judith Justice (violin); Lars Sveinsson (trumpet); and Kurt Schwertsik (horn and [in Ichiyanagi] recorder), conducted Atlas Eclipticalis with Winter Music (electronic version, Tudor) and Toshi Ichiyanagi, Sapporo.

8-16 May 1963. Zagreb, National Theatre, Muzički Biennale [Music Biennale], under the auspices of the City of Zagreb. Attended; in program with Witold Lutosławski (Trois poŹmes de Henri Michaux) lectured on contemporary American music (presumably Where Are We Going? and What Are We Doing?), David Tudor (piano) participating (10 May, afternoon); performed with David Tudor and members of the Zagreb Philharmonia, conducting music by Cage, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Christian Wolff [first performance] (11 May, midnight concert); presumably also participated in The Composer and Technical Means, seminar of the International Music Centre Vienna, under the auspices of UNESCO; interviewed by Tadeusz Kaczyńsky (Cage/Kaczyńsky 1963; Carter 1963; Kučera 1963; Schat 1963; Schuller 1963; Silva 1971).

20 May 1963 (evening). Munich, Münchner Kammerspiele, Werkraumtheater, Neue Musik, organized by Landeshauptstadt München, Münchner Jugendkulturwerk, Kulturreferat, Jeunesses Musicales: lectured and performed (as conductor) with David Tudor (piano) and Wolfgang Schröder (clarinet); Richard Popp (bassoon); Rolf Quinque (trumpet); Michael Stern (trombone); Wolfgang Greindl (bass tuba); Horst Huber (percussion) and probably others: Atlas Eclipticalis with Winter Music (electronic version); Toshi Ichiyanagi, Sapporo; Christian Wolff, For 5 or 10 Players.

22 May 1963. Stockholm, Fylkingen Society. Atlas Eclipticalis, Variations II, and Variations III performed.

25 May 1963. Oldenburg, Großer Schloßsaal, Kompositionsabend. Performed with David Tudor, Winter Music (electronic version), Variations II, Christian Wolff, For Pianist (Tudor), Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano No. 4, Cartridge Music (Meyer-Denkmann 2002).

30 May 1963. Stockholm, Moderna Museet, in collaboration with Fylkingen. Performed with David Tudor (piano), Bruno Eichenholz (violin), Jan Barks (trombone): Variations II with Variations III (with Tudor); Toshi Ichiyanagi, Sapporo (conductor); interviewed by Torsten Ekbom (Berg, C. 1963; Ekbom 1963; Marja 1963; Pergament 1963; Reimers, L. 1963).

30 May 1963. Rome, Manifestazioni di Musica. Mauricio Kagel performed Theatre Piece.

1 June 1963 (evening). Copenhagen, Den Frie Udstillingsbygning (Oslo Plads 1), organized by Det Unge Tonekunstnerselskab in collaboration with Sommerudstillingen 1963: Fluxus Festival. Performed with David Tudor: Winter Music (electronic version), Variations II with Variations III, and Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano No. 4.

3 June 1963. Copenhagen, Danmarks Radio. Performed with David Tudor: Christian Wolff, Duo for Pianists I. With Tudor interviewed by Mogens Andersen.

4 June 1963. Traveled to Essen.

7 June 1963 (evening). Essen, Amerika-Haus, Kompositionsabend. Performed [on two pianos] with David Tudor: Winter Music (electronic version), Variations II (Tudor) with Variations III, and Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano No. 4 (C.D. 1963; Essener Woche 1963; F.F. 1963; H.B. 1963; H.S. 1963; Hck 1963; Stachelhaus 1963).

9 June 1963. Flew back to New York.

17 June-26 July 1963. Los Angeles, California, University of California at Los Angeles. In residence with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (Vaughan 1997, 129-130).

23 and 28 June 1963. Amsterdam and The Hague, Fluxus Festival. Unidentified piece performed (23 June, Amsterdam, Hypokriterion); 28 June (The Hague, Bleijenburg 16) (Block, R. and Freybourg 1983, 26; Sohm 1970).

6 July 1963. London, Goldsmiths College. Concert for Piano and Orchestra performed.

10 July 1963. Malibu, California. Completed Variations IV.

July 1963. Long Beach, California. Possibly performed with David Tudor at the invitation of 14-year old Peter Pesic (Mauk 1963).

17 July 1963. Los Angeles, University of California. Performed with Merce Cunningham; gave first performance of Variations IV to Field Dances (Mauk 1963; Vaughan 1997, 129-130).

Prior to 21 July 1963. Rome. Theatre Piece performed, coordinated by Frederic Rzewski (De Gramont 1963).

27 July 1963. Ithaca, New York, Cornell University. Cartridge Music and Radio Music performed.

13 August 1963 (perhaps repeated on 16 August). New York, Lincoln Center, Philharmonic Hall, August Fanfare. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Winter Music to Aeon; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; conducted Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) to Antic Meet (Hughes, A. 1963; R.B. 1963).

16 August 1963. New London, Connecticut, Connecticut College, Dance School, American Dance Festival. Merce Cunningham and Dance Company possibly performed Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Winter Music to Aeon.

20-21 August, 27-28 August and 3-4 September 1963 (evenings). New York, Judson Hall (165 West 57th Street), New York International Festival of Avant-Garde Music, organized by Earle Brown, Charlotte Moorman, and Frederic Rzewski, presented by impresario Norman J. Seaman. In program shared with music by Giuseppe Chiari (Teatrino) and Karlheinz Stockhausen (Klavierstück X) performed by Frederic Rzewski, performed with David Tudor: Variations III, with Variations II (Tudor), and Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano No. 4 (two pianos, 21 August); Charlotte Moorman and David Tudor performed 26'1.1499" for a String Player with 34'46.776" for a Pianist, presented as 34'46.776" for a Pianist and a String Player (3 September); conducted Christian Wolff, For 5 or 10 People and Toshi Ichiyanagi, Sapporo (4 September) (Ericson 1963; Newsweek 1963; Parmenter 1963; Rubin, M. 1963; Saunders-Scope 1963).

26 August 1963. Munich, Bayerischer Rundfunk. Amores performed.

9-10 September 1963 (evening-afternoon, 18:00 pm-12:40 pm). New York, Pocket Theater (100 Third Avenue at 13th Street), New Music at the Pocket Theater, New York International Festival of Avant-Garde Music, concert for the benefit of the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts. Initiated and participated in first complete non-stop performance of Erik Satie, Vexations, lasting eighteen hours and forty minutes, with relay team of ten pianists initially consisting of John Cale, McCrae [MacRae?] Cook, Philip Corner, David Del Tredici, Viola Farber, James Tenney, David Tudor, Christian Wolff, Robert Wood, assisted by Joshua Rivkin [Rifkin?], and a number of volunteers (among them critic Howard Klein) replacing participants having dropped out (Bender 1963; Cage 1967i; Cage/Stein 1982; Golas 1963; Gruen 1963; My 1963; New York Herald Tribune 1963; New York Times 1963; Schonberg 1963a; Schonberg et al. 1963; Solet 1963).

11 October 1963 (evening). New York, Town Hall (123 West 43rd Street), presented by the Foundation for the Contemporary Performance Arts. Co-organized concert with music for orchestra and chorus by Morton Feldman and Earle Brown given by the Contemporary Chamber Ensemble conducted by Arthur Weisberg and Earle Brown, the Brandeis University Chamber Chorus, directed by Alvin Lucier; with David Tudor gave first performance of Morton Feldman, Vertical Thoughts 1; other performances: Morton Feldman, Vertical Thoughts 2-5 and The Straits of Magellan (first performances), and performances of For Franz Kline, The Swallows of Salangan; Earle Brown, From Here (first performance), December 1952 from Folio; Pentathis, Available Forms I (Hitchcock 1964; Salzman 1963a; Strongin 1963).

11 November 1963 (late afternoon). Austin, Texas, University of Texas, Recital Hall. Performed with David Tudor: Variations III with Variations II (Tudor); George Brecht, Incidental Music; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano No. 4; question period (Cross, L.M. 2001).

12 November 1963. Austin, Texas, University of Texas. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Company.

15 November 1963. Cologne, Westdeutscher Rundfunk, Großer Sendesaal, Musik der Zeit, Elektronische Musik aus vier europäischen Studios: Fontana Mix, as well as music by Luciano Berio, Mauricio Kagel, Henri Pousseur, and Włodzimierz Kotoński presented and introduced by Karlheinz Stockhausen; Cage not in attendance (Everschor 1963; Gs. 1963; HvL 1963a; HvL 1963b; Krellmann 1963b; Rothärmel 1963b; Schab 1963a; Schab 1963b; Sky 1963).

20 December 1963. New York, New School for Social Research: Tone Roads Chamber Ensemble, James Tenney, director, performed Concert for Piano and Orchestra as well as music by Morton Feldman, Charles Ives, Carl Ruggles, and Edgard VarŹse (Salzman 1963a).

1964. Received North American Mycological Association’s award for contributions to amateur mycology (Lincoff 1992-1993, 5).

1964. Performed with David Tudor: Christian Wolff, For 1, 2 or 3 People (first performance).

3 January 1964. Sinclair, New Jersey: Milton Cage, Cage’s father, born 11 March 1886, died (Cage 1973h, 102, 178; Cage/Schaardenburg 1970, 52).

9 January 1964. Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University, Dodson Auditorium, Lectures in the Humanities: presented Fontana Mix and read 45' for a Speaker; question period afterwards (Alston 1964; Daily Reveille 1964; Proskowetz 1964).

6-9 February 1964 (9 February matinee). New York, Lincoln Center, Philharmonic Hall. At the initiative of Leonard Bernstein, performed with James Tenney (assistants to the conductor), Atlas Eclipticalis with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by a “conducting-machine,” simultaneously with Winter Music (electronic version using a fifty-channel mixer built by Max Mathews and Phil Giordano of Bell Labs), performed by David Tudor (piano and electronics); program also featured Earle Brown, Available Forms II, Morton Feldman, … Out of “Last Pieces” and music by Antonio Vivaldi and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Biancolli 1963; Biancolli 1964; Cage 1967o, 69; Cage/Cope 1980, 16; Cardew 1972; Downes 1970; Harrison, J.S. 1964; Johnson, H. 1964a; Kastendieck 1964; Klein, Ho. 1964; Kolodin 1964; Miller, L.E. 2001; Newsweek 1964; Osborne 1964; Rich 1964; Sargeant 1964; Schonberg 1964; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 40; Time 1964a; Tomkins 1965, 139-144).

27 February 1964. Duluth, Minnesota, College of Saint Scholastica. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano to Story; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies for Player Piano [sic] no. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 to Crises (tape).

28 February 1964. Ann Arbor, Michigan, VFW Ballroom, ONCE Festival. Brandeis University Chamber Chorus, Alvin Lucier, conductor, performed Solo for Voice 2 as Solos for Voice 2; Cage presumably not in attendance.

March 1964 (weeklong festival). San Francisco, California, San Francisco Tape Center, Tudor Fest, organized by Pauline Oliveros. David Tudor and members of the San Francisco Tape Center performed music by Cage (including Atlas Eclipticalis) and composers associated with him; Cage in attendance (Oliveros 1980).

21 March 1964 (matinee). Hartford, Connecticut, Wadsworth Atheneum. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Cartridge Music (as Duet for Cymbal) to Paired (first performance); Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) with WBAI (Cage) to Antic Meet; Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace (version for two pianos); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet.

Spring 1964. Performed with David Tudor and Christian Wolff: Christian Wolff, Trio II (piano four hands and percussion, first performance).

April 1964. Cunningham Dance Foundation was formed (Vaughan 1984, 64).

3 April 1964. San Francisco, San Francisco Tape Music Center and Ann Halprin Dancers’ Workshop School (321 Divisadero, Pacific Heights), produced by the San Francisco Tape Music Center and radio station KPFA. Performed with David Tudor and others, Atlas Eclipticalis with Winter Music; Concert for Piano and Orchestra; Cartridge Music; Music Walk (Frankenstein 1964).

7 April 1964. Stony Point, New York: Wrote first of “Two Statements on Ives” (Cage 1967n).

April 1964. Honolulu, Hawaii. Wrote [Untitled, 1964] [text for “The Arts in Dialogue”].

14-26 April 1964 (or earlier). Honolulu, Hawaii, University of Hawaii, East-West Center, Eighth Annual Festival of Music and Art of This Century, director Marian Kerr (19-26 April): with Toru Takemitsu and himself as visiting composers and Kiyoshi Saito and Antonio Frasconi as visiting artists, participated (his graduate assistant was Fredric Lieberman); concert, exhibition, reception (19 April, evening, John Fitzgerald Kennedy Theatre); contemporary films, including Works of Calder (20 April, evening, Mae Zenke Orvis Music Auditorium); solo and ensemble concert: prepared and conducted Atlas Eclipticalis (using amplified cafetaria trays unto which various objects were dropped); also performances of Armand Russell, Montage, and Fredric Lieberman, String Quartet (21 April, evening, Mae Zenke Orvis Music Auditorium); artist-composer panel discussion, “Where Is Humanism in the New Art,” moderated by Alfred Preis (22 April, evening, Mae Zenke Orvis Music Auditorium); opening of exhibition of prints by visiting artists (23 April, evening, Honolulu Academy of Arts); student solo and ensemble concert (24 April, evening, Mae Zenke Orvis Music Auditorium); concert of music and dance (26 April, evening, John Fitzgerald Kennedy Theatre); interviewed by Cobey Black and Janis Williams (Black 1964; Jackson, B. 1964; Malamalama 1964; Miller, L.E. 2001, 548, 553; Russell, A. 1966; Williams, Janis 1964).

4 May 1964 (arrived on 3 May). Lubbock, Texas, Texas Technological College, Department of Music, Student Union Building, Coronado Room, 13th Symposium of Contemporary Music (22 April-8 May). Performed with David Tudor on two amplified pianos, assisted by Lowell Cross: Variations II with Variations III and Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano No. 4 (electronic version); question period (Cross, L.M. 2001; Lubbock Avalanche Journal 1964; Sasser 1964; Sheridan 1964).

4 May or later-November 1964. Began a world tour to Europe and Asia (India, Thailand, Japan) with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (Barnes, C. 1966b; Terry, W. 1964; Tomkins 1980, 228-233).

April 1964 or later. Berlin. Performed Sonatas and Interludes (Herzfeld 1971).

2 June 1964. New York, Carnegie Recital Hall. Max Neuhaus performed 27'10.554" for a Percussionist in shared program with music by Earle Brown, Bo Nilsson, and Karlheinz Stockhausen; Cage presumably not in attendance (Strongin 1964).

6 June 1964. Strasbourg, ThéČtre de la Comédie. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies for Player Piano [sic] no. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 to Crises (tape); Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes.

8 June 1964. Paris, Ballets Modernes de Paris studio. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, lecture-demonstration.

12-14 June 1964. Paris, ThéČtre National de l’Est Parisien. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies for Player Piano [sic] no. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 to Crises (tape); Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (Cage) (12 June, evening); Rune; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor) (13 June, evening); Cartridge Music (as Duet for Cymbal) to Paired; Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (14 June, matinee); interviewed by John Ashbery (Ashbery 1964; Cage 1967o, 85n; Cage 1968c; Ephron 1964; Lenoir, J.-P. 1964).

16 June 1964. Bourges, Comédie de Bourges. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies for Player Piano [sic] no. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 to Crises (tape); Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor).

18 June 1964. Venice, Teatro La Fenice, Biennale di Venezia. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story (Bortolotto 1964).

24 June 1964. Vienna, Museum des 20. Jahrhunderts. Performed with Friedrich Cerha, Peter Greenham, Judith Justice, Petr Kotik and David Tudor (all on percussion) and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Atlas Eclipticalis to Museum Event No. 1 (Cunningham 1982a, 179-180; Tudor/Scheib 1996).

27 June 1964. Mannheim, Nationaltheater. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet.

5 July 1964. Essen, Folkwang-Hochschule. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor).

6 July 1964. London, University of London, Goldsmith’s College. Possibly participated in concert: Aria, Concert for Piano and Orchestra, Music of Changes (1962 Wiesbaden, 32; Sohm 1970).

12 July 1964 or earlier. Düsseldorf, Kunstakademie. Performed percussion music; initiative Joseph Beuys, who was in the audience (Gs. 1964; Kramer, M. 2001).

12 July 1964. Cologne, Opernhaus. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano to Crises (tape); La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet.

16 July 1964. Les Beaux, Festival de danse des Baux de Provence. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano to Crises (tape); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet.

23-24 July 1964. Dartington, Devon, England, Dartington Hall. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor) (23 July); Cartridge Music (as Duet for Cymbal) to Paired, Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (24 July).

Summer 1964. London: Water Music performed (Wintle 1964).

27 July-1 August 1964. London, Sadler’s Wells Theatre (Rosebury Avenue). Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor) (27-28 July); Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Christian Wolff, Music for Merce Cunningham to Rune (29-30 July); Atlas Eclipticalis with Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies for Player Piano (collage arranged by Cage) to Cross Currents (first performance of the dance); Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (Cage); Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor) (31 July); Cartridge Music (as Duet for Cymbal) to Paired; Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace; Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (Cage); La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (1 August, matinee); Cartridge Music (as Duet for Cymbal) to Paired; Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (1 August, evening); interviewed with Merce Cunningham by The Times previously (Barnes, C. 1964c; Bland 1964a; Buckle 1964a; Buckle 1964b; Cardew 1964; Clarke, M. 1964; Daily Mail 1964; Hope-Wallace 1964; Mellers 1964c; New Statesman 1964; Porter, A. 1964a; Porter, A. 1964b; Roberts, N. 1964; Spectator 1964; Time 1964b; Times 1964a; Times 1964b; Times 1964d; Times 1964e; Times 1964f).

5-22 August 1964 (evenings). London, Phoenix Theatre (Charing Cross Road). Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace; Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet (5-8 August); Field Dances; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Christian Wolff, Music for Merce Cunningham to Rune (10-13 August); from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies for Player Piano (collage arranged by Cage) to Cross Currents; Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (Cage) (14-15, 17-18 August); Cartridge Music (as Duet for Cymbal) to Paired; Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor) (19-22 August) (Barnes, C. 1964a; Barnes, C. 1964b; Bland 1964b; Cardew 1964; Clarke, M. 1964; Goodwin, N. 1964; Spectator 1964; Time 1964a; Times 1964c).

30 August 1964. New York, Judson Hall (165 West 57th Street), Second Annual New York Festival of the Avant Garde (part of 15th series of Interval Concerts). Charlotte Moorman performed 26'1.1499" for a String Player in shared program with works by George Brecht, Earle Brown, Giuseppe Chiari, Jennings, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Nam June Paik, and Karlheinz Stockhausen (Bender 1964; Ericson 1964; Kerner 1964).

2 September 1964. Stockholm. Composed Electronic Music for Piano.

8-14 September 1964. Stockholm. Performed with David Tudor and with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Atlas Eclipticalis (percussion part) to Museum Event # 2 (8 September, Moderna Museet); videotaped for Swedish television: Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor) (9 September, Moderna Museet); Royal Swedish Ballet with guest appearance by Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (9 September, Opera); performed with David Tudor, first performance of Electronic Music for Piano and music by Sylvano Bussotti (5 Piano Pieces, PiŹces de Chair), Toshi Ichiyanagi, and Christian Wolff, For 1, 2 or 3 People (10 September, Moderna Museet, New York-Kväll, co-organized by Fylkingen); Variations IV to Museum Event # 3; Tudor, Fluorescent Sound; Öyvind Fahlström, FĆglar i Sverige (14 September, Moderna Museet); Cunningham gave lecture-demonstration (10 September, Baletakademi) (Dagens Nyheter 1964; Hähnel 1964a; Hähnel 1964b; Hähnel 1965; Hellqvist 1964; Johnson, Be. E. 1964).

16 September 1964. Turku, Ābo Svenska Teater. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (Cage); Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor) (G. 1964; Heikinheimo 1964b).

18 September 1964. Helsinki, Ruotsalainen Teatteri [Svenska Teatern] (Pohjoisesplanadi 2). Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham Dance Company: Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Solo for Piano) with WBAI to Antic Meet; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; with Tudor recorded Atlas Eclipticalis (percussion parts) and Winter Music for radio (Heikinheimo 1964a).

September 1964. Copenhagen. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (Tomkins 1980, 232).

22 September 1964. Prague, Park of Culture. Performed with David Tudor, Musica Viva Pragensis (led by Petr Kotik) and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape) (Bek 1964).

24 September 1964. Ostrava, Opera House. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor).

27 September 1964 (noon). Warsaw, Teatr Dramatyczny, 8th Warsaw Autumn (18-27 September). Performed with David Tudor, Musica Viva Pragensis (led by Petr Kotik) and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Cage, conductor; Tudor, piano) to Antic Meet; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Variations II and Variations III (without dance); Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Christian Wolff, Music for Merce Cunningham to Rune (Pociej 1964a; Pociej 1964b; Vaughan 1997, 143).

28 September 1964. Invited by Bohdan Pociej, attended office of Ruch Muzyczny (Pociej 1964b).

29 September 1964. Poznań, Paustwowa Opera. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet.

3 October 1964. Krefeld, Theater der Stadt Krefeld. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (Cage).

5 October 1964. Brussels, Belgian Television. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, videotaping Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape) (Tomkins 1980, 232).

6 October 1964. Brussels, Palais des Beaux-Arts. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies for Player Piano (collage arranged by Cage) to Cross Currents; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet (Tomkins 1980, 232).

7 October 1964. Antwerp, Koninklijke Nederlandse Schouwburg. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor) (Tomkins 1980, 232).

8 October 1964. Scheveningen, Kurzaal. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor); La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch.

15-16 October 1964. Bombay, Bhulabhai Desai Auditorium. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Cartridge Music (as Duet for Cymbal) to Paired; from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (15 October); Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape) (16 October).

21-22 October 1964. Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India, Mangaldas Town Hall. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations IV to Cross Currents; Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (Cage) (21 October); Collage III, Cartridge Music (as Duet for Cymbal) to Paired; Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story (22 October) (Vaughan 1997, 293).

25-26 October 1964. Chandigarh, Punjab, Tagore Theatre. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (Cage) (25 October); Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet (26 October) (Cage 1968[UNTITLED]/1970, 183).

29-30 October 1964. New Delhi, Aifacs. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace; Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor); La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (29 October); Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet (30 October); met Octavio Paz and Marie-José Paz.

3 November 1964. Bangkok, High School Auditorium. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (Royal Command Performance): Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor) (Tavom 1964; Tomkins 1980, 232).

6, 10-11 November 1964. Tokyo, Sankei Hall, Otemachi, presented by Sogetsu Art Center. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano (electronic version) to Story; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet (6 November); Variations IV to Cross Currents; Atlas Eclipticalis with Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Sapporo (electronic version) to Story; Christian Wolff, Suite to Changeling (Tudor) (10 November); Cartridge Music (as Duet for Cymbal) to Paired; from Music for Piano 4-84 to Suite for Five; Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (Cage); La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (11 November).

12 November 1964. Kobe. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Winter Music (electronic version) to Aeon; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch.

16 November 1964. Osaka, Festival Hall. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-84 to Suite for Five; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Sapporo to Story; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor).

21 November 1964. Madrid, Universidad de Madrid, Colegio Mayor Menéndez Pelayo (Ciudad Universitaria, Avenido de Séneca). Zaj (group founded 19 November 1964), Concierto de Teatro Musical. Juan Hidalgo, Walter Marchetti, and Ramón Barce performed 0'00" and Variations IV in shared program with pieces by Ramón Barce, Juan Hidalgo, and Walter Marchetti (Barce 1965; La Motte-Haber 1994).

24-25 November 1964. Tokyo, Sankei Hall, Otemachi, presented by Sogetsu Art Center. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; Erik Satie, Trois morceaux en forme de poire to Septet; Christian Wolff, For Piano I to Untitled Solo (Tudor); Christian Wolff, Music for Merce Cunningham to Rune (24 November); Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Sapporo to Story; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor) (25 November).

1965-1968. President of the Cunningham Dance Foundation, and director of the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts. To fund the Foundation for the Contemporary Performance Arts, assembled an archive of music manuscripts intended as a cross section of “what was being done” in 1965-1968, to be sold to the highest bidder and exhibited in various museums around the world (Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 40).

1965. Received award from the Standard Awards Committee of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) (Brimhall 1976, 22).

Early January 1965. Southern California tour also included engagement at the University of California, San Diego.

6 January 1965. Los Angeles, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Jean Delacour Auditorium. Read On Robert Rauschenberg, Artist, and His Work, 26 Statements Re Duchamp, and Jasper Johns: Stories and Ideas.

6-7 January 1965. Pasadena, California, Pasadena Art Museum, upstairs Auditorium, Encounters, co-sponsored by the museum, Coleman Chamber Music Association, Pasadena Music Teachers’ Association. Prepared electronics (6 January) and performed with David Tudor (7 January): Variations II; 0'00"; Cartridge Music as Duet for Cymbal (two performances, 7:30 and 9:30 pm) (Independent 1965).

10 January 1965. Santa Barbara, University of California, Campbell Hall, Committee on Arts and Lectures. Performed with David Tudor: Christian Wolff, For 1, 2 or 3 People, Cartridge Music as Duet for Cymbal, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano No. 4; introduced performance with talk, “Instant Music” with music examples (Nielsen 1965; Tanner 1965; Willard 1965).

12 January 1965. Los Angeles, California, Feigen/Palmer Gallery (515 North La Cienega Boulevard). Performed with David Tudor in benefit concert for the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts: Variations IV (three or six-hour performance, 8:00 pm-11:00 pm or until 2:00 am), partially recorded Everest SDBR 3132, Everest SDBR 3230, Everest LPBR 6132, Legacy International CD 439) (Cage/Smalley and Sylvester 1972, [12]; Yates 1967, 335-336).

16 January 1965 (evening). San Francisco, California, San Francisco Museum of Art, Rotunda (McAllister Street at Van Ness Avenue), presented by The Women’s Board of the San Francisco Museum of Art and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. Performed with David Tudor, using piano, four tape machines, four shortwave radios, two bull horns, eleven glass mixing bowls, pitcher, garden watering can, three gas-filled balloons: Cartridge Music as Duet for Cymbal, Christian Wolff, For 1, 2 or 3 People, Variations IV and other compositions; gave talk, “Instant Music,” following the performance, with question period and discussion (Caen 1964; San Francisco Chronicle 1964).

February 1965. Ann Arbor, Michigan, ONCE Festival, presented by the Dramatic Arts Center. Performed with David Tudor: Variations IV (Mumma 1967b).

10 February 1965. Saratoga, New York, Skidmore College. Merce Cunningham and Dance Company performed: from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; Variations IV to Field Dances/Collage III/Cross Currents; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Cage’s participation uncertain.

12-14 February 1965. New York, Hunter College Playhouse. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations IV to Field Dances/Collage III; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (Cage) (12-13 February); from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; Cartridge Music (as Duet for Cymbal) to Paired; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (14 February) (Hughes, A. 1965c).

13 February 1965. Completed Adolph Weiss: Reminiscences [text].

22 February 1965. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kresge Auditorium. Performed with David Tudor and Christian Wolff: Cartridge Music (as Trio for Cymbal); Christian Wolff, Trio II and two other pieces (Falck 1965).

28 February-2 March 1965. Buffalo, New York, Festival of the Arts Today (27 February-13 March). Attended; conducted Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and David Tudor, piano, in Concert for Piano and Orchestra; program also featured (Lukas Foss, conductor) music by Edgard VarŹse, Krzysztof Penderecki, Morton Feldman, Wojciech Kilar (28 February, afternoon, Kleinhans Music Hall); performed with David Tudor, Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Winterbranch, Cartridge Music (as Duet for Cymbal) to Paired; Variations IV to Field Dances/Collage III/Cross Currents; Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace (1 March, State University College); Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace (with Tudor); Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (2 March, State University College); interviewed by Buffalo Courier-Express (Buffalo Courier-Express 1965; Taubman 1965; Thomas, R. 1965).

4, 6, and 7 March 1965. New York, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York State Theater, Modern Dance in Repertory (March). In program shared with American Dance Theater and Juilliard Dance Ensemble, Merce Cunningham and Dance Company performed La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (4 March, evening, and 6 March, matinee); Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace (7 March, matinee and evening); Cage’s participation uncertain (Hughes, A. 1965a).

16 March 1965 (evening). Kingston, Rhode Island, University of Rhode Island, Edwards Auditorium, presented by Arts Council of the University of Rhode Island. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-19, Music for Piano 21-36/37-52, Music for Piano 53-68, Music for Piano 69-84 to Suite for Five; Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 to Crises (tape); Variations IV and perhaps other music to Field Dances, Collage III and Cross Currents (performed as a continuous event).

18 March 1965. Charleston, Illinois, Eastern Illinois University, School of Music, Fine Arts Theatre, American Music Festival. Performed Rhythm, Etc. and 0'00".

19-20 March 1965. Urbana, University of Illinois, Festival of Contemporary Arts (26 February-11 April). Presumably attended performance of Concert for Piano and Orchestra by University of Illinois Chamber Ensemble; Ellsworth Snyder, piano; Charles Hamm, conductor (19 March, Smith Music Hall); performed 45' for a Speaker and 0'00" (20 March, afternoon, Smith Music Hall).

28 March 1965. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, YM-YWHA. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations IV to Cross Currents; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch.

2 April-Early May 1965. Stony Point, New York and Waltham, Massachusetts. Composed Rozart Mix.

8 April 1965. New Brunswick, New Jersey, Douglas College: talk by Merce Cunningham with excerpts from La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Conlon Nancarrow, Rhythm Studies to Crises (tape); Cage’s participation uncertain.

12 April 1965. Ripon, Wisconsin, Ripon College. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 to Crises (tape); La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Variations IV and perhaps other music to Field Dances, Collage III and Cross Currents (performed as a continuous event).

13-14 April 1965. Houston, Texas. Attended; performed Where Are We Going? and What Are We Doing? (13 April, University of Saint Thomas, Jones Hall); performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company, presented by the Houston Contemporary Arts Association: Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 to Crises (tape); La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Variations IV and perhaps other music to Field Dances, Collage III and Cross Currents (performed as a continuous event) (14 April, Music Hall) (Ogg 1965; Roussel 1965).

April-prior to 21 April 1965. Edisto Beach, South Carolina. Wrote Mosaic.

5 May 1965. Waltham, Massachusetts, Brandeis University, Rose Art Museum. With others, gave first performance of Rozart Mix (Cage/Kirby and Schechner 1965, 57; Lucier 1988).

9 May-21 November 1965. Rockland and Westchester counties, New York: participated in New York Mycological Society walks (Cage 1970h).

17 May 1965. Musica Nova, Tónleikar í Lindarbĺ. Charlotte Moorman (violoncello) performed 26'1.1499" for a String Player in concert with Nam June Paik (piano) and Robot 456, including George Brecht, Entrance Music; Nam June Paik, Rondo Allegro and Variations on a Theme by Saint-SaĎns; Earle Brown, Synergy; Guiseppe Chiari, Per arco; Dieter Rot, Lullaby 4; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Duet; La Monte Young, Composition 1960 #3; Brecht-Tenny, Exit Music (Morgunblađiđ 1965).

22-23 May 1965. Yellow Springs, Ohio, Antioch College, Auditorium, Silence. Performed with David Tudor: Cartridge Music as Duet for Cymbal; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Music for Piano #4 (electronic version); Variations IV (annouced as “Variations IV (Variation)”) (22 May); Rhythm, Etc. (23 May).

14-15 June 1965. Berlin, Galerie René Block (Frobenstraße 18), Siebte Soirée. Charlotte Moorman performed 26'1.1499" for a String Player (Glanzelius 1965; Kotschenreuther 1965; Langer, W. 1965; Schauer 1965; Sohm 1970).

22 June 1965. New York, Hugh Hardy & Associates (122 East 25th Street). Conversation with Hugh Hardy and Brian Carey concerning a modern dance center.

7 July 1965. Davis, University of California, Department of Music, Freeborn Hall. New Music Ensemble, Robert Moran, director, performed Concert for Piano and Orchestra with Aria in shared program with music by Morton Feldman, Robert Moran, and free group improvisations; Cage’s attendance uncertain.

23 July 1965. New York, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Philharmonic Hall, New York Philharmonic French-American Festival (14-31 July). In program shared with the Group for Contemporary Music at Columbia University, Richard Dufallo, conductor, Bethany Beardsley, soprano, and the Lenox Quartet (performing music by Edgard VarŹse, Pierre Boulez, and Elliott Carter), performed with Malcolm Goldstein, Fredric Lieberman, James Tenney, David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations V (first performance, forty minutes); television images by Nam June Paik (Aufbau 1965; Bender 1965; Breuer 1965; Cunningham, M. 1982b; Herzogenrath 1976, 18; Hughes, A. 1965b; Hughes, A. 1965d; Lawrence, R. 1965; Miller, L.E. 2001; Music Journal 1965; New York Times 1965; Nyman 1974, 82; Terry, W. 1965; Vaughan 1997, 146-150).

30-31 July 1965. Upper Black Eddy, Pennsylvania, Sundance. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations II (Tudor); 0'00" (Cage); Variations IV (Cage and Tudor) (30 July, concert performance); Music for Piano (Nos. 4-84, selection) to Suite for Five; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Variations V (31 July, dance performance) (Miller, L.E. 2001).

Summer 1965. Michael Finkelstein accompanied Cage as chauffeur to Emma Lake and to mushroom hunts by the New York Mycological Society in Londonderry, Vermont (Dahlberg 1965).

15-28 August 1965. Emma Lake, Saskatchewan. Conducted music workshop, wrote Diary: Emma Lake Music Workshop 1965, performed Where Are We Going? And What Are We Doing? (Cage 1966b; Cage 1967o, 21n, 23).

20 August 1965. Brookville, New York, C.W. Post College. Merce Cunningham and Dance Company performed Variations V; Cage presumably did not participate (Miller, L.E. 2001).

Prior to 30 August 1965. Interviewed by Ilhan Mimaroglu (Cage/Mimaroğlu 1965).

September-6 October 1965. Stony Point, New York. Composed Variations V.

September 1965. Wrote Seriously Comma and Talk I [texts].

September 1965. New York, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Studio: requested by Irving Glick, improvised statement on Charles Ives recorded for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio, written out December 1966 (Cage 1967o, 36).

10 September 1965. Stockholm, Festspel, organized by Fylkingen. Yuji Takahashi performed from Sonatas and Interludes and, with others, Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Sällström 1965).

11 September 1965. New York, Judson Hall (165 West 57th Street), Third Annual New York Avant Garde Festival (25 August-11 September). Theatre Piece performed by Allan Kaprow, Charlotte Moorman, Nam June Paik and others; Cage probably not in attendance (Herzogenrath 1976, 18; Smith, Michael 1965; Sohm 1970).

19 September 1965. Ann Arbor, Michigan, Maynard Street Parking Structure (top level), ONCE Again Festival, presented by the Dramatic Arts Center. Gave first performance of Talk I with David Tudor (electronic manipulations), assisted by Gordon Mumma (Miller, L.E. 2001; Mumma 1967b).

Prior to 1 October 1965. Stony Point, New York. Interviewed by Ninette Lyon (Lyon 1965).

October 1965. Wrote Nam June Paik: A Diary [text].

14 October 1965. New York, Carnegie Recital Hall. Merce Cunningham and Dance Company gave lecture-demonstration; Cage’s participation uncertain.

10 November 1965. Salt Lake City, Utah, University of Utah. Probably performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Music for Piano [1-84] to Suite for Five; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Variations IV to Collage III; Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes.

23-28 November 1965. Chicago, Illinois, Harper Theatre, Dance Festival. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Variations V (23 November); Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace (version for two pianos); How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run (with electronic modifications by Tudor); Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) with WBAI (Cage) to Antic Meet (24 November); Field Dances/Collage III; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Nocturnes (25 November); from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run; Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Nocturnes (26 November); Field Dances/Collage III; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Variations V (27 November, matinee); How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run, Variations V; Morton Feldman, Ixion to Summerspace (27 November, evening); Variations IV to Field Dances/Collage III; How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run; Solo for Piano from Concert for Piano and Orchestra (Tudor) with WBAI (Cage) to Antic Meet (28 November) (Cage 1967o, 133n; Levy, B. 1965; Miller, L.E. 2001; Williams, M. 1965).

November 1965. Chicago, Illinois, Harper Theater, Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, Jazz at Midnight: participated (with 0'00") in Imperfections in a Given Space with the Joseph Jarman Quartet (Ellis Bishop, trumpet, alto saxophone; Joseph Jarman, alto saxophone; Bob Hodge, bass; Doug Mitchell, percussion, piano (Cage/Boenders 1980, 219; Kim 2008; Kim 2012a; Kumpf 1975; Welding 1966).

23 November-11 December 1965. New York, Galeria Bonino, exhibition, “Nam June Paik: Electronic Art,” for which Cage wrote Nam June Paik: A Diary.

4 December 1965. Stony Point, New York. Letter to J. Bernlef (Cage 1967i).

5 December 1965. New Haven, Connecticut, Yale School of Art and Architecture: lectured; question period afterwards (Cage/Anonymous 1967).

7 January 1966. Waltham, Massachusetts, Brandeis University, Slosberg Recital Hall. Williams Mix presented; Cage presumably not in attendance (Friedmann 1966).

12 January 1966. New York. Wrote Electronic Souls [text].

3-5 February 1966. Beloit, Wisconsin, Beloit College, Avant-Garde Festival. Attended; gave concert-lecture including (presumably first) reading from Diary: How to Improve the World (You Will Only Make Matters Worse) 1965 (4 February, morning, Eaton Chapel); performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Music for Piano 4-84 to Suite for Five; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (tape machines); How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run (alone) (4 February, evening, Field House); participated in panel discussion with Cunningham and Tudor, introduced by Richard Olson (5 February, morning, Eaton Chapel [or Wisconsin Art Center]); festival also featured master class by Cunningham (3 February, afternoon), keynote address by Harold Rosenberg (3 February, evening); films; informal discussion sessions (Cage 1967o, 3; Stocking and Stocking 1966).

7 February 1966. Seattle, Washington, Seattle Center Playhouse. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations V (Hinterberger 1966; Miller, L.E. 2001; Wagoner 1966).

8 February 1966. Burnaby, British Columbia, Simon Fraser University. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations V (Miller, L.E. 2001).

9 February 1966 (afternoon). Vancouver, British Columbia, University of British Columbia, Festival of the Contemporary Arts. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano [4-84] to Suite for Five and How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run (alone).

10-12 February 1966. Eugene, Oregon, University of Oregon, Thirteenth Annual Festival of Arts: The Arts in Transition (6 February-7 March). Attended; performed with David Tudor (10 February, School of Music, Auditorium); gave seminar with Tudor (11 February, morning, 202 Music Building); performed with Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations V (12 February, University Theatre) (Miller, L.E. 2001).

14 February 1966. Bellingham, Washington, Western Washington State College. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations V (Miller, L.E. 2001).

March 1966. Stony Point, New York. Composed Variations VI.

March 1966. Rochester, New York, University of Rochester. Performed with Lowell Cross and David Tudor: Variations IV (Cage 1967o, 50n; Lebel 1966).

March 1966. Between Rochester, New York and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Wrote Diary: Audience 1966 [text] (Cage 1967o, 50n).

5 March 1966. Hartford, Connecticut, Wadsworth Atheneum. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations V (Miller, L.E. 2001; T.H.P. 1966).

Prior to 23 March 1966. Hartford, Connecticut, Avery Memorial Theatre. Performed; interviewed by Florence Berkman (Berkman 1966).

13 March 1966. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Performed (Cage 1967o, 50n; Sohm 1970).

26 March 1966. Hartford, Connecticut, Fine Arts Foundation. Performed with David Tudor (Berkman 1966).

27 March 1966. New York, Juilliard School of Music, Concert Hall, A Gala Evening of Drama, Dance and Music in honor of World Theatre Day, presented by United States Centre of the American National Theatre and Academy of the International Theatre Institute. In shared program performed with Merce Cunningham Dance Company: unknown music by Cage to Composition X (1966).

April 1966. New York. Transcribed Music for Carillon No. 4 for a two-octave instrument.

19-20 April 1966. San Jose, California, San Jose State College Music Department, Concert Hall, Sixth Festival of 20th-Century Music (19-23 April): presumably attended concert by the San Jose state College Percussion Ensemble, Amores, Double Music, First Construction (19 April); lectured (20 April).

23 April 1966. New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (and presumably with David Tudor): Concert for Piano and Orchestra to Antic Meet; from Music for Piano to Suite for Five; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (Barnes, C. 1966a).

27 April 1966. Washington, D.C., Pan American Union Auditorium (Constitution and 17th Street), Now Festival, Private Arts Foundation (also performed at the Gallery of Modern Art?). Gave first performance of Variations VI with David Tudor (Aarons 1966; Cage/Smalley and Sylvester 1972, [12]; Sohm 1970).

29 April 1966 (afternoon). New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Opera House. Presumably performed with (David Tudor and) Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano to Suite for Five in shared program with three other dance companies (Barnes, C. 1966d).

May 1966. Bremen, Pro musica nova. Cathy Berberian performed (Züghart 1966).

12-13 May 1966. Toronto, Ontario, Art Gallery of Toronto, Sculpture Court. Interviewed by John Kraglund (12 May); in program shared with music by Lowell Cross and Anthony Gnazzo, performed Variations VI with David Tudor (13 May) (Kraglund 1966).

19 May 1966. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Temple University. Lectured (Rhythm, Etc., and presumably other texts), presented excerpt from Variations IV as a recording and performed on prepared piano (Wallace, M. 1966).

21 May 1966 (morning). New York, Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, Twelfth National Conference of the Arts Councils of America, “The Arts: Planning for Change” (19-21 May), session “The Changing Audience for the Changing Arts,” Jade Room (3rd Floor). Participated with William Alfred, Elizabeth Hardwick, Stanley Kauffmann (chair), John H. MacFadyen and Richard Schechner and read Diary: Audience 1966 as an opening statement (Cage 1966a; Cage 1966h; Cage 1967o, 50; Cage et al. 1966; Kostelanetz 1970d, 76n).

June 1966-15 October 1967. Compiled A Year from Monday (Cage 1967o).

19-24 June 1966. Aspen, Colorado, Aspen Institute, Amphitheater, International Design Conference. Participated; performed Part 1 of Diary: How to Improve the World and Where Are We Going? And What Are We Doing?; presented recording of (presumably) Variations IV (22 June); Gyorgy Kepes also spoke at the conference (Aspen Flyer 1966a; Aspen Flyer 1966b; Aspen Times 1966; Cage 1967o, 3; Daily Journal 1966; Haddad 1966; Illustrated Aspen News 1966).

July-completed early September 1966 in Pontpoint, Oise. Wrote Diary: How to Improve the World and Where Are We Going? And What Are We Doing? [Part Two].

9 July 1966. New York, WBAI. Radio Happening with Morton Feldman (Cage/Feldman 1993).

15 July 1966. New York, Lincoln Center, Philharmonic Hall, Stravinsky Festival. Participated as the devil in Igor Stravinsky’s Histoire du soldat, with Elliott Carter (soldier) and Aaron Copland (narrator); ensemble conducted by Lukas Foss; Stravinksy in attendance (Carter 1971; Copland and Perlis 1989, 380; Harrison, J.S. 1966; Klein, Ho. 1966b; Moore, Ca. 1966; Schiff 1983; Stravinsky, I./Craft 1972b, 106; Stravinsky, V. and Craft 1979, 476).

29 July 1966. Sitges [near Barcelona]. Performed with Merce Cunningham Dance Company, a performance for which Joan Miró donated a painting and designed a poster (Barnes, C. 1966b; Cage 1967o, 85n; Tharrats 1982, 153; Vaughan 1997, 152-154).

1-7 August 1966. Saint-Paul-de-Vence, Fondation Maeght, Nuits de la Fondation Maeght. Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company [four performances, six dances performed]: Variations V (5 August); first performance of Gordon Mumma, Mesa to Place (6 August); Atlas Eclipticalis (percussion), as music to Museum Event # 4 (7 August); filmed by Klaus Wildenhahn [films] (Cage/Charles 1968, 18; Metzger, H.-K. 1966; Miller, L.E. 2001; Vaughan 1997, 152-154).

August or September 1966. Hamburg, Norddeutscher Rundfunk, Studio Hamburg. Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor, and Merce Cunningham Dance Company: Variations V; film performance for a film by Arne Arnbom (films) and filmed by Klaus Wildenhahn (films) (Miller, L.E. 2001; Vaughan 1997, 152-156).

September 1966. Pontpoint, Oise. Performed with Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor, and Merce Cunningham Dance Company; filmed by Klaus Wildenhahn (films).

September 1966. Cadaqués. Wrote Miró in the Third Person: 8 Statements.

September-October 1966. Revised Mosaic.

9 September 1966. New York, Fourth Annual New York Festival of the Avant-Garde. Variations III performed (Sohm 1970).

5 or 12 and 21 September 1966. New York, WBAI. Radio Happening with Morton Feldman (Cage/Feldman 1993; WBAI Folio 1966).

Fall 1966. University of Illinois, Conference on Dance and the Related Arts. Merce Cunningham and Dance Company held discussions and demonstrations; Cage’s participation uncertain (Magnuson 1967).

October 1966. Wrote Foreword [to A Year from Monday] [text].

15-16 October 1966. New York, 69th Regiment Armory (68 Lexington Avenue, 25th-26th Street), Nine Evenings: Theatre and Engineering (13-16, 18-19, 21-23 October), initiated and coordinated by Billy Klüver of Bell Telephone Laboratories, involving ten artists and approximately thirty Bell Telephone engineers. Gave first performances of Variations VII with David Behrman, Lowell Cross, Anthony Gnazzo, and David Tudor, assisted by performance engineer Cecil Coker; the project also featured performances by Lucinda Childs, Vehicle; Öyvind Fahlström, Kisses Sweeter Than Wine; Alex Hay, Grass Field; Deborah Hay, Solo; Steve Paxton, Physical Things; Yvonne Rainer, Carriage Discreteness; Robert Rauschenberg, Open Score; David Tudor, Bandoneon!; Robert Whitman, Two Holes of Water; preparations for the project had begun January 1966, and there were several meetings (27 July, New York, atelier of Robert Rauschenberg; 1 August; 12 August); rehearsals late September-early October, Berkeley Heights, New Jersey; installations were mounted 8-12 October; Nine Evenings led to the formation of Experiments in Art and Technology by engineers Billy Klüver and Fred Waldhauer and artists Robert Rauschenberg and Robert Whitman (Abeel 1966-1967; Adler 1966; Barnes, C. 1966c; Brockman 1966; Bryant, G. 1966a; Bryant, G. 1966b; Bryant, G. 1967; Cross, L.M. 2001; Genauer 1966; Glueck 1966a; Glueck 1966b; Klüver 1967; Klüver 1969; Klüver 1980, 89, 96-97; Mekas 1966; Newsweek 1966; Village Voice 1966; Whitman 1967).

20 and 25 October 1966. New York, Carnegie Recital Hall, sponsored by the Istituto Italiana di Cultura New York. Cathy Berberian performed with Richard Burge (piano) and Stuart Dempster (trombone): Aria with Fontana Mix, A Flower, The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs; The Beatles, Michelle, Yesterday, She’s Got a Ticket to Ride; Cathy Berberian, Stripsody; Luciano Berio, Sequenza V (Dempster) (the originally announced performance of Berio’s Circles was canceled); Robert Erickson, Ricercare a 5 (Dempster, with tape), Henri Pousseur, PhonŹmes pour Cathy; three Kurt Weill songs (Klein, Ho. 1966a; Rich 1966).

31 October-November 1966. Stockholm. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations V (2 November, Stadsteater); performed Diary: How to Improve the World (You Will Only Make Matters Worse) 1965 and Continued 1966 (3 November, Moderna Museet); Cunningham lectured (5 November, Moderna Museet) (Miller, L.E. 2001; Ulrika 1966; Vaughan 1997, 156).

3 November and 12 December 1966. Elected Knight of Mark Twain twice by Cyril Clemens (1902-1999) in recognition of his outstanding contribution to American music and to American scholarship by his book Silence.

9-12 November 1966. Paris, ThéČtre des Champs-Elysées, QuatriŹme Festival International de Danse. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run (alone); La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch; Gordon Mumma, Mesa to Place; Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Nocturnes (Cage) (9-10 November?); Variations V (11-12 November); while in Paris, interviewed by Jean-Jacques Lebel (Lebel 1966; Miller, L.E. 2001).

18 November 1966. Lisbon, Tivoli. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations V (Miller, L.E. 2001).

19 November 1966. Lisbon, Império. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations V (Miller, L.E. 2001).

23 November-3 December 1966. London, Saville Theatre. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations V and other dances (possibly Variations IV to Field Dances) (23-26 November and 1-3 December) (Goodwin, N. 1967; Hall, F. 1966; Times 1966a; Vaughan 1997, 156).

25 November 1966. Hamburg, Norddeutscher Rundfunk, 3. Programm. First broadcast of Klaus Wildenhahn, John Cage (film).

Prior to 28 November 1966. London. Read from Diary: How to Improve the World (Musical Events 1967; Payne 1967; Times 1966b).

1966 (presumably late). London, Sadler’s Wells Theatre. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company.

December 1966. Interviewed by Roger Smalley and David Sylvester for BBC Third Programme.

15 December 1966. Munich, Arri-Filmtheater (Türkenstraße 91 beim Siegestor), Neue Musik München 1966-1967 season. First public screening of Klaus Wildenhahn, John Cage (film) in program with Mauricio Kagel, Antithese.

Late 1966. London, Shaftesbury Theatre. Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor and Merce Cunningham Dance Company: Variations V; Erik Satie, Nocturnes to Solo [?] (Cage).

December 1966. New York, School of Visual Arts, Visual Arts Gallery, Mel Bochner, exhibition Working Drawings and Other Visible Things on Paper Not Necessarily Meant to Be Viewed as Art. Contributed excerpt from Imaginary Landscape No. 5 (Bochner 1997).

9-10 December 1966. New York, Hunter College, Playhouse, Hunter College Modern Dance Series. Presumably performed with Merce Cunningham Dance Company.

28 December 1966. New York, WBAI. Radio Happening with Morton Feldman (Cage/Feldman 1993).

1967. Ithaca, New York, Cornell University. Performed (on piano) (Gerber 1987).

1967. Introduced by the poet Wendell Berry to the Journal of Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862). Later it was Thoreau’s notion of individual anarchism as expressed in Resistance to Civil Government of 1849 (the definitive title, Civil Disobedience, belongs to the second, posthumous edition of 1866) which attracted Cage in particular.

11 January 1967. Cincinnati, Ohio. Wrote McLuhan’s Influence.

16 January 1967. New York, WBAI. Radio Happening with Morton Feldman (Cage/Feldman 1993).

26-27 January 1967 [presumably not 27-28 January]. Schenectady, New York, Union College, Memorial Chapel, Contemporary Voices in the Arts, organized by the New York State Council on the Arts, first installment. Participated with Robert Creeley, Merce Cunningham, Billy Klüver, Len Lye, Jack Tworkow and Stan VanDerBeek; managed by David Vaughan (Glueck 1967; Kostelanetz 1970d, illustration 55; Krieger, R.E. 1967a; Simmons, J. 1967).

30-31 January 1967 [announcement: 23-24 January]. Binghamton, New York, Harpur College, Theater, Contemporary Voices in the Arts, second installment. Participated (performance on 30 January) (Hickling 1967).

Between 31 January and 13 February 1967. Third (of seven, plus concluding evening) installments of Contemporary Voices in the Arts, two-day projects each usually involving an evening presentation with discussion afterwards, and classroom discussions the next day; in each project one of the seven artists moderated (Glueck 1967).

Presumably Early February [announcement: 25-26 January; possibly canceled]. New Paltz, New York, State University College, Contemporary Voices in the Arts Series, sponsored by the New York State Council on the Arts, fourth installment. Participated (Knickerbocker News 1967b).

6 February 1967. Davis, California. David Tudor performed Fontana Mix (version for piano and electronic circuits) (Cross, L.M. 1974, 769).

13-14 February 1967 (evening and morning). Troy, New York, Rensselaer Polytechic Institute, Contemporary Voices in the Arts Series. Participated (Times Record 1967).

14 February 1967 (afternoon and evening). Albany, New York, State University of New York, Campus Center, Ballroom, Contemporary Voices in the Arts Series, sponsored by the New York State Council on the Arts. Participated with Robert Creeley, Merce Cunningham, Billy Klüver, Stan VanDerBeek, Len Lye, and Jack Tworkow (moderator) (Albany Student Press 1967; Knickerbocker News 1967a; Knickerbocker News 1967b; Krieger, R.E. 1967b).

15-16 February 1967. Canton, New York, St. Lawrence University, Contemporary Voices in the Arts Series. Participated with Robert Creeley, Merce Cunningham, Billy Klüver, Len Lye, Jack Tworkow and Stan VanDerBeek (performance on 15 February) (Hill News 1967; Pavek 1967; Rutledge 1967; Shapiro, L. 1967).

16-17 February 1967 [canceled?]. Potsdam, New York, State University College, Contemporary Voices in the Arts Series. Participated (Knickerbocker News 1967b).

January-mid-May 1967. Cincinnati, Ohio, University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music. Composer in Residence during Spring semester (second and third quarters). Conducted two seminars; met Jeanne Kirstein, who performed his music for prepared piano during his residency (Cage 1970p; Cage/Bell 1967; Cage/Kostelanetz 1970, 12; Cage and Hiller/Austin 1968, 11; Development Reports 1967; Cincinnati Enquirer 1966; Cincinnati Post 1966; Darack 1967; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 40; University of Cincinnati News Record 1966).

14 February 1967. University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music: LaSalle Quartet performed String Quartet in Four Parts (Cage/Bell 1967).

18-19 February 1967. Roanoke, Virginia, Hollins College. Residency. Composed Music for Carillon No. 5 (18 February); it was first performed on the same day. Performed with Gordon Mumma and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-84 to Suite for Five; How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run (alone); Gordon Mumma, Mesa to Place (18 February, Little Theatre, Ninth College Dance Festival of Virginia); Cunningham Company master class, lecture-demonstration; college dance program with critique by Cunningham; unindentified work to Ruth Armstrong, Ruth Barkman, Beth Boan, Rita Burroughs, Joan Hallford, Judy Hoskins, Nancy Kelly, Ann Leonard, Marianne Perrin, Dorothy Robinson (Madison College), A Woman’s Work is Never Done (Cage/Shapiro 1985, 115-116).

22 February 1967. Allentown, Pennsylvania, Muhlenberg College. Presented recording of Variations VII, read from How to Improve the World (Flanagan, R. 1967).

25 February 1967. New York, Young Men’s-Young Women’s Hebrew Association (92nd Street and Lexington Avenue), Contemporary Voices in the Arts Series. Participated with Robert Creeley, Merce Cunningham, Billy Klüver, Stan VanDerBeek, Len Lye, and Jack Tworkow and David Vaughan in concluding evening (Cage 1975c, 96; Higgins 1967; Kostelanetz 1970d, illustration 56; Village Voice 1967).

6 March 1967. University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music. With others performed Atlas Eclipticalis; Variations IV; 0'00" (Bell, E. 1967; Cage/Bell 1967).

Spring 1967. Cincinnati, Ohio. Conceived Newport Mix.

Spring 1967. Cincinnati, Ohio, Newport Yacht Club’s houseboat, presented by the Contemporary Arts Center. First performance of Newport Mix (Darack 1967).

24 March 1967. Cincinnati, Ohio. Letter to Larry Austin (Cage, Kremen, and Tudor/Austin 1967).

1 April 1967. Waltham, Massachusetts. David Tudor performed Fontana Mix (version for bass drum and electronic circuits) (Cross, L.M. 1974, 769).

1 April 1967. Brooklyn, New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Opera House. Merce Cunningham and Dance Company performed Variations V (film sequences Stan VanDerBeek, electronic devices Billy Klüver), Collage III (Pierre Schaeffer), Variations IV to Field Dances; Mumma, Place; Cage presumably not in atttendance.

5 April 1967 (evening). Cincinnati, Ohio, University of Cincinnati, Laws Auditorium. Performed Where Are We Going? And What Are we Doing?.

7 April 1967. Cincinnati, Ohio. Letter to Larry Austin (Cage, Kremen, and Tudor/Austin 1967).

10 April 1967. Cincinnati, Ohio. Letter to Larry Austin (Cage, Kremen, and Tudor/Austin 1967).

12 April 1967. Cincinnati, Ohio, University of Cincinnati, Union Losantiville Room. Read from Diary: How to Improve the World.

15 April-16 April 1967. Toronto, Ontario, Isaacs Gallery (832 Yonge Street), Mixed Media Concerts, organized by Udo Kasemets. David Tudor, assisted by Lowell Cross, performed Solo for Voice 2 with Fontana Mix (realization for piano and electronic circuits) in program with music by Mauricio Kagel and Pauline Oliveros (15 April evening, 16 April afternoon and evening).

17-19 April 1967. Northfield, Minnesota, Carleton College, Skinner Memorial Chapel, Humanities Symposium, Carleton College Centennial Celebration, Challenges to Reason: participated with Germaine Brée, Harold Bloom, and Wayne Booth, gave illustrated lecture (17 April); discussion and questions (19 April, morning).

19-20 April 1967. Lexington, Kentucky, University of Kentucky, School of Fine Arts, Festival of the Arts (5-22 April). Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run (with David Vaughan); Variations V; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (19 April, Memorial Coliseum); lectured (20 April, Guignol Theatre) (Werle 1967).

21 April 1967 (evening). Cincinnati, Ohio, University of Cincinnati, Wilson Auditorium, Spring Arts Festival (21-30 April). Performed with two pianists (perhaps Tudor and Mumma), Merce Cunngham and Dance Company, Music for Piano 4-84 with David Tudor to Suite for Five, How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run, with David Vaughan; also performed: Gordon Mumma, [music], to Place (Wilkens 1967).

23 April 1967. Columbus, Ohio State University, Battelle Auditorium, organized by School of Music and Department of Dance. Performed with David Tudor, Gordon Mumma, David Vaughan, and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: from Music for Piano 4-84 to Suite for Five (with Tudor); How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run (with Vaughan); also La Monte Young, 2 Sounds to Winterbranch (Mumma?).

26 April 1967. Cincinnati, Ohio, University of Cincinnati. Participated in panel discussion on American underground film with Stan Brakhage, Jonas Mekas and Stan Vanderbeek (Cage et al. 1968).

26 April 1967. Cologne, Westdeutscher Rundfunk, Musik der Zeit. Gertrud Meyer-Denkmann and Frederic Rzewski (pianos), the Ensemble für Neue Musik Freiburg Kurt Schwertsik (conductor) and Michael von Biel (assistant) performed Atlas Eclipticalis with Winter Music and Cartridge Music.

27 April 1967. Cincinnati, Ohio, University of Cincinnati, Laws Auditorium (afternoon). Lectured on his music for prepared piano; Jeanne Kirstein performed The Perilous Night (Darack 1967).

28 April 1967. Cincinnati, Ohio, WGUC Radio. Lectureed on his music for prepared piano; Jeanne Kirstein performed The Perilous Night and A Valentine Out of Season.

28 April 1967 (4pm). Cincinnati, Ohio, University of Cincinnati, University Center, Union Faculty Lounge, Spring Arts Festival, Cinema ’67 Symposium, sponsored by Union Film Society. Moderated by James McGinnis, participated in panel discussion with Stan Brakhage, Jonas Mekas, Stan VanDerBeek (Cage et al. 1968).

May 1967. Skowhegan, Maine. With Keith McGary gave first performance of Variations VIII (Fetterman 1996, 202).

11 May 1967 (evening). Holland, Michigan, Hope College, Dimnent Chapel, invited by the college Cultural Affairs Committee. Performed with David Tudor, Toshi Ichiyanagi, and Lowell Cross: Fontana Mix (live electronic version, Tudor) with 0'00"; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Appearance (performed by all four on two oscillators, 2 ring modulators, assisted by Hope College students David Tubergen, violin and Bruce Formsma, trumpet); Lowell Cross, Musica Instrumentalis; Alvin Lucier, Music for Solo Performer (Holland Evening Sentinel 1967).

28 May 1967. Buffalo, New York, Kleinhans Music Hall, American Music in the University. Conducted the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra with Lukas Foss (piano): Concerto for Prepared Piano and Chamber Orchestra in shared program with music by Robert Marvel, Allen Sapp, Milton Babbitt, and Lukas Foss.

3 June 1967. New Canaan, Connecticut, Philip Johnson Glass House. Performed with Toshi Ichiyanagi, Gordon Mumma, David Tudor and Merce Cunningham Dance Company: Museum Event # 5, filmed by Wildenhahn 1967 [films] (Cage 1967o, 163).

21 July 1967. Spring Valley, New York, Temple Beth El (in conjunction with Temple Beth Sholom, New City). Held arts service with three dancers (Frances Alenikoff, Felix Fibich, Laura Foreman), organ (La Monte Young), two singers, electronic music (Gerhon Kinsley), slide and film projections, lighting effects, prayers by Rabbis Luois Frishman and Robert Schreibman and sermon by John Cage based on words by Buckminster Fuller, co-ordinated by Ken Dewey (Shepard 1967).

12 August 1967. Skowhegan, Maine, Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Performed Dialogue with Merce Cunningham (Vaughan 1997, 159, 162).

16 September 1967-15 June 1968 and September 1968-June 1969. Urbana, Illinois, University of Illinois. Visiting Research Professor (Associate) appointed by the Center for Advanced Study, Graduate College, in the School of Music. Proposed two projects: the work that was to become HPSCHD and a large-scale work for chorus and orchestra with electronics using the “Ten Thunderclaps” from Joyce’s Finnegans Wake. The latter plan proved too time-consuming, since it took Cage and Lejaren Hiller (1924-1994), with whom he collaborated, two years to realize HPSCHD. The computer programs Hiller wrote included a subroutine simulating the manual method of consulting the mechanism of the I Ching. Edward Kobrin extracted this subroutine into an independent program producing printouts, which Cage was to use almost without exception from this time onwards; interviewed by Patricia Sibbert on his professorship prior to 29 September 1967 (Cage/Gagne and Caras 1982, 74; Champaign-Urbana Courier 1967; Kobrin 1970; Sibbert 1967; Spiegel 1968).

29-30 September 1967. New York, J.F. Kennedy Ferry Boat, White Hall Terminal, Staten Island Ferry, 5th New York Avant Garde Festival. Variations III performed in realization by Nam June Paik; Variations IV performed in realization by Kenneth Werner; Cage’s participation uncertain (Sohm 1970).

15 October 1967. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University Press. Publication of A Year from Monday: New Lectures and Writings (Cage 1967o).

23 October 1967. Chicago, Illinois, Second City (1616 North Wells Street), What Did You Bring? An Evening with John Cage, Alison Knowles, Dick Higgins, presented by the Museum of Contemporary Art as part of its opening festivities. Performed Variations VIII simultaneously with Alison Knowles, String Piece; performances of Cage, Mushrooms [sic] (twice); Dick Higgins, Graphis 132 and More, Danger Music No. 17; Alison Knowles, Bean Roll Reading, Blue Ram, Newspaper Music, Proposition (twice); Alison Knowles and Lugo Gosewitz, News of the Day; Ben Vautier, Apple (Fetterman 1996, 202-203).

Prior to 11 November 1967. Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, University of Illinois. Interviewed by various students (Converse 1967b).

12-13 November 1967. Redlands, California, University of Redlands, Religion and the Arts, Religious Emphasis Week (12-17 November). Participated; dicussion with Tom F. Driver, Dornbach, Derfer, Robert Cremean (12 November, evening, Chapel); performed from Diary: How to Improve the World (13 November, evening, Chapel).

16 November 1967. Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, University of Illinois, Urbana Campus, Assembly Hall, University in Motion: Matrix for the Arts (15-19 November). Merce Cunningham and Dance Company performed.

Prior to 17 November 1967. Conceived Musicircus.

17 November 1967 (8 pm-1 am). Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, University of Illinois, Stock Pavillion (Pennsylvania Avenue), University in Motion: Matrix for the Arts (15-19 November). Co-ordinated and performed (“Variations on a Theme by David Tudor”) in first performance of Musicircus, announced as Music Circus, performers including Pamela Andrews, Michael Bates, Shirley Blankenship, Charles Braugham, Cecil Bridgewater, Carolyn Brown (dance), Neely Bruce, Paul Chouinard, James Cuomo, Jocy de Oliveira, Dennis Eberhard, Jack Feldpausch, Jim Fulkerson, Etta Green, Cheryl Hamma, Mitchell Hennes, Michael Holloway, Thomas Howell, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Dennis Kam, Claude Kipnis (mime), James Knapp, Milton Knox, Ann Kozuch, Richard Krug, Norma Marder, Maurice McKinley, Dennis Melhouse, Gordon Mumma, Randy Opela, Keith Payne, Bob Rosen, Joyce Rosenfield, Jim Ross, Howard Smith, Jerry Tessin, David Tudor, Michael Udow, Fredric Van Tellingen, Norman Wilson, William Windhorst, Robert Witmer, William Youhass, Tony Zamora; weather ballons supplied by Chanute Air Force Base Weather School, Colonel Dunn, Commander; preceded by panel, “Theater and the University: Amusement or Art?,” Joseph Chaikin, Merce Cunningham, June Havoc, Claude Kipnis, Wilford Leach, participants, moderated by Dore Schary (afternoon, Law Building, Auditorium); previously interviewed by Steve Yahn (Cage 1970l; Cage 1973e, xiii; Charles 1970c; Converse 1967a; Cusack, M., Hain, and Sejud 1967; Daily Illini 1967; Finley 1967; Husarik 1983, 4-6; Rivest 2001b; Udow 1995; Yahn 1967; Zumstein 1967).

Prior to 18 November 1967. Wrote University in Motion: Matrix for the Arts.

18 November 1967 (morning). Champaign-Urbana, University of Illinois, Illini Union, Illini Rooms A and B, panel, “Music and the University: What Kind? What Aim?” Participated with Gunther Schuller and Charles Wuorinen; presumably read University in Motion: Matrix for the Arts [text] (Husarik 1983, 20, n16).

21 November 1967. Detroit, Michigan, Institute of Arts, Auditorium. Performed with Toshi Ichiyanagi, Gordon Mumma, David Tudor, and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Ichiyanagi, Activities for Orchestra to Scramble; Mumma, Mesa to Place (Tudor, bandoneon; Mumma, sound system); How to Pass, Kick, Fall and Run (Cage).

Circa 1968. CBS-TV. Performed with Merce Cunningham: Variations IV to Field Dances, version for television (Brown, C. 1968).

5-16 January 1968. New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music. Presumably performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company.

16 January 1968. Oakland, California, Mills College, Art Gallery, presented by the Tape Music Center. Charles Boone, Martin Bartlett, Tony Gnazzo, Bill Moraldo, Ed Nylund, and David Tudor performed Variations VI (Mills Quarterly 1968).

26 January 1968. Elected Member of the National Institute of Arts and Letters of the American Academy (ASCAP Today 1968; New York Times 1968; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 40).

31 January 1968. Received Phebe Ketchum Thorne Fellowship, $10,000 (Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 40).

31 January 1968. London, Queen Elizabeth Hall, presented by ICA Music Section. London Percussion Ensemble performed First Construction (in Metal) in shared program.

5 March 1968 (evening until after midnight). Toronto, Ontario, Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, Sightsoundsystems Festival of Art and Technology, organized by Udo Kasemets. Gave first performance of Reunion, a concert of electronic music using various sound systems activated by the moves on a prepared chessboard. Chess players were Cage, Marcel Duchamp, and Teeny Duchamp [Alexina Sattler]; electronics operated by David Behrman, Lowell Cross (1938), Carson D. Jeffries (1922-1995), Gordon Mumma and David Tudor (recorded [Takeyoshi Miyazawa]; Cage 1980g; Cage/Roth and Roth 1973, 78; Chasins 1972, 19; Cross, L.M. 1970, 26, 28; Cross, L.M. 1974, 769; Cross, L.M. 1999; Cross, L.M. 2001; Kubota 1970; Miller, L.E. 2001; Miller, L.E. 2002a, 162-163; Nyman 1974, 83; Schwarz, A. 1969/1997, 71 [error in date]; Williams, P. and Rosenbaum 1968).

8-10 March 1968. Buffalo, New York, State University College, 2nd Buffalo Festival of the Arts Today (2-17 March). Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (residency mid-February to mid-March): participated in Music Panel Discussion with Lukas Foss and Alfred Frankenstein (8 March, afternoon, Gallery Auditorium); (among other works) Variations V (date unknown); Gordon Mumma, Mesa to Place; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Activities for Orchestra to Scramble; and How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run (Cage) (8 March, Harper Theater, Upton Auditorium, filmed by Englander 1968 [films]); David Tudor, Rainforest to Rainforest (9 March, first performance, Harper Theater, Upton Auditorium); David Behrman, “... for nearly an hour...” to Walkaround Time (10 March, first performance, Harper Theater, Upton Auditorium); Yuji Takahashi with Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, Lukas Foss conducting, performed Concerto for Prepared Piano and Chamber Orchestra as well as music by Iannis Xenakis, Lukas Foss, and Krzysztof Penderecki (12 March, Kleinhans Music Hall) (J.D. 1968; Johns/Vaughan 1989, 140-141; Vaughan 1997, 162-166; recording Nonesuch).

12-14 March 1968. Hamilton, New York, Colgate University. Lectured; performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (14 March, evening).

3 April 1968. Bayside, New York, Queensborough Community College. Performed with Gordon Mumma, Toshi Ichiyanagi, David Tudor, and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Gymnasium Event # 1.

May 1968. Completed Notations, a book edited with Alison Knowles (published 1969). In the preceding years, Cage had assembled a collection of music manuscripts to fund the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts.

1 May 1968. Bloomington, Illinois, Normal State University. Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor and Merce Cunningham, Gymnasium Event # 2.

4 May 1968. Peoria, Illinois, Bradley University. Performed with David Behrman and Merce Cunningham, Gymnasium Event # 3 and Variations V.

5 May 1968. Peoria, Illinois, Lakeview Art Center. Performed with Merce Cunningham, Museum Event # 6.

Prior to 8 May 1968. Wrote Time to Walk in Space.

8 May 1968 or earlier. New York, WBAI-FM. Performed stories about Merce Cunningham, later known as Time to Walk in Space [text].

10 March 1968. Washington, D.C., Phillips Collection. Maro Ajemian performed Sonatas and Interludes; Cage presumably not in attendance (Kriegsman, A. M. 1968; Lowens 1968).

13 May 1968. Oakland, California, Mills College. Participated in concert with Performing Group (Rubin, N. 1968).

15-17 May 1968 and 22-26 May 1968. New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music: probably performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Variations V; also featured Rainforest (music by David Tudor), Walkaround Time (music by David Behrman), Scramble (music by Toshi Ichiyanagi) (Glueck 1968).

27 May 1968. New York, Electric Circus. Performed with Lowell Cross and John Kobler (and possibly with David Tudor): Reunion (Cross, L.M. 1970, 28; Schonberg 1968).

Early June 1968. Tokyo, Hibiya Hall, Orchestral Space ’68. Toshi Ichiyanagi and the Japan Philharmonic Orchestra, Kazuyoshi Akiyama conducting, performed Concerto for Prepared Piano and Chamber Orchestra (Wilkes 1968).

19 June 1968. Urbana, Illinois. Interviewed by Larry Austin (Cage and Hiller/Austin 1968, 13).

June-July 1968. Boulder, Colorado. Residency of Merce Cunningham Dance Company (Vaughan 1997, 166).

10 July 1968. Boulder, Colorado. Interviewed by Larry Austin (Cage and Hiller/Austin 1968, 11).

Late July-August 1968. On tour with Merce Cunningham Dance Company to Latin America; tour included Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, Buenos Aires, Caracas (Mumma 1976, 247; Vaughan 1997, 166).

15-20 July 1968. México, D.F., Teatro de Bellas Artes, Programa Cultural de la XIX Olimpiada, Festival Internatiocal de las Artes, presented by the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes. Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor and Merce Cunningham Dance Company: from Music for Piano 1-84 to Suite for Five, Tudor, Rainforest to Rainforest (Tudor), Mumma, Mesa to Place (Mumma and Tudor) (15 July; 16 July; 20 July, evenings); How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Activities for Orchestra to Scramble; La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (18 July, evening; 19 July, late afternoon); Variations IV to Field Dances; David Behrman, … for nearly an Hour… to Walkaround Time; Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); Pierre Schaeffer and Pierre Henry, from Symphonie pour un homme seul to Collage III (19 July, evening; 20 July, late afternoon).

Between 21 July-early August 1968. Rio de Janeiro, Teatro Novo. Performed with Merce Cunningham Dance Company (K. S. 1968).

Circa 5-12 August 1968. Buenos Aires, Teatro Municipal General San Martin (Avenida Corrientes). Performed with Merce Cunningham Dance Company: Variations IV to Field Dances; David Behrman, … for nearly an Hour… to Walkaround Time; Bo Nilsson, Rörelser, Slagfigurer, Kvantiteter to Night Wandering (Tudor); press conference (6 August) (K.S. 1968; Panorama 1968).

After circa 12 August 1968. Caracas. Performed with Merce Cunningham Dance Company (K. S. 1968).

1 September 1968. Made tape realizations for HPSCHD with Lejaren Hiller, using the Iliac II-computer (Cage and Hiller/Austin 1968, 14).

22 September 1968. Warsaw, Warsaw Autumn. Stuart Dempster performed “Solo for Trombone” from Concert for Piano and Orchestra; Water Music performed (Pospíšil 1968b).

October 1968. New Jersey. Crete Cage died (Cage 1973h, xi, 178; Cage/Kostelanetz 1968WE/1970, 15n; Cage/Schaardenburg 1970, 52).

2 October 1968. Neuilly-sur-Seine. Marcel Duchamp, born 28 July 1887, died.

9-10 November 1968. Berkeley, California, University of California, Zellerbach Auditorium. Performed with David Tudor and Merce Cunningham Dance Company.

18 November 1968. San Francisco, California, San Francisco College for Women. William Masselos performed Sonatas and Interludes (presumably selection) in concert with music by Aaron Copland and Franz Liszt (Tircuit 1968).

26-31 December 1968. Palermo, 6th Settimana Internazionale di Palermo, Rassegna Musicale. Attended; concert with Winter Music (electronic version for five pianos) and Morton Feldman, False Relationships and the Extended Ending (31 December, Teatro Biondo) (Böhmer 1969b ; Klein, Ru. 1969; Lanza Tomasi 1969; Weissmann 1969).

1969. Wrote Art and Technology [text].

1969. Buffalo, New York, Albright-Knox Gallery. Performed (Cage/Macadams 1987).

1969. Stony Point, New York. Arranged memorial wake for his mother (Lederman 1982, 229-230).

1-8 January 1969. Chichen Itza, Yucatan, Mexico. Contributed to I.U.B.S./UNESCO Symposium, Biology and the History of the Future, with Carl Goeran-Heden, Margaret Mead, John Papaioannou, John Platt, Ruth Sager and Gunter Stent, presented by C.W. Waddington (Cage et al. 1972).

18 January 1969. New York. Presented “The Music of Conlon Nancarrow” with Viola Farber, Gordon Mumma, Peter Saul and David Tudor (Cross, L.M. 1974, 769).

3 February 1969. New York, Town Hall. Grete Sultan performed The Perilous Night in program shared with music by Aaron Copland, Arnold Schoenberg, and Claude Debussy (Ericson 1969).

5-7 February 1969. Tokyo, Yoyogi National Gymnasium (basketball gymnasium designed by Kenzo Tange for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics), Cross Talk Intermedia, Three-day Japanese-American Festival of film, projected images, music, electronics, theater, lights, and dance, organized by Roger Reynolds, sponsored by the American Cultural Center. Included performance of Music for Carillon No. 5 [in a version for prepared pianos, electronics, ten-channel audio system?] in shared program with music and art by Toru Takemitsu, Tatsumi Hijikata (choreographer), Toshi Ichiyanagi, Takahiko Iimura, Toshi Matsumoto, Joji Yuasa; essays by Cage, Buckminster Fuller, Taro Okamoto, Shuzo Takeguchi, Kenzo Tange, Peter Yates were distributed with the program notes; Cage not in attendance; Gordon Mumma, Robert Ashley, Salvatore Maritano, and Stan VanDerBeek representing the United States (New York Times 1969).

March 1969. Carbondale, Indiana. Recorded Diary: How to Improve the World (You Will Only Make Matters Worse) Continued 1967 (or excerpt) (Giorno Poetry Systems Records GPS 003 [recordings]).

8 March 1969. Urbana, Illinois, University of Illinois. Completed HPSCHD, in collaboration with Lejaren Hiller.

April 1969. With Lejaren Hiller composed Program (KNOBS) for the Listener, issued between April 1969-July 1971 (at least).

April 1969. Urbana, Illinois, University of Illinois. Interviewed by Don Finegan, Ralph Koppel and Ralph Haskell (Cage/Finegan, Koppel and Haskell 1969a; Cage/Finegan, Koppel and Haskell 1969b).

22 April 1969. Rome, Teatro Sistina. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company.

16 May 1969 (7:30 P.M. to midnight). Champaign-Urbana, University of Illinois, Assembly Hall, presented by the School of Music, University of Illinois, and by the Assembly Hall. Attended first performance of HPSCHD, given by William Brooks, Challis Single (Solo III), Neely Bruce, Hubbard Double (Solo VI), Philip Corner, Neupert Double (Solo VII), Ronald Peters, Brueggeman Double (Solo IV), Yuji Takahashi, Dowd Double (Solo V), Antoinette Vischer, Neupert Double (Solo II); David Tudor, electronic Baldwin Solid Body Harpsichord (Solo I); Al Blatter, Jon Bauman, Clive Coen, Dennis Eberhard, James Fulkerson, Mary Fulkerson, Thomas Howell, Dennis Kamm, Udo Kasemets, James Knapp, Morgan Powell, Peter Salemi, Joe Sekon, James Stroud and others, two hundred and eight monaural computer-generated tapes on fifty-two tape machines, seven pre-amplifiers and fifty-nine power amplifiers with fifty-two loudspeakers in all (sound system: Jaap Spek and George Ritscher); visual contributions (six thousand four hundred slides on eighty-four carousel slide projectors, forty motion pictures on twelve movie projectors on one 340-foot circular plastic screen and eleven rectangular screens) by Ronald Nameth and Calvin Sumsion; coordination Jack McKenzie; press luncheon (Sheraton-Chicago Hotel, Camelot Room, prior to 10 May) and various interviews given several days previously; interviewed by Time (Billboard 1969a; Billboard 1969b; Billboard 1969c; Burba 1969; Champaign-Urbana Courier 1969a; Champaign-Urbana Courier 1969b; Charleston 1969; Decatur Sunday Herald and Review 1969; Gherardini 1969a; Gherardini 1969b; Gherardini 1969c; Gherardini 1969d; Goss 1969; Haas, J. 1969; Heimbecker 2008; Husarik 1979; Husarik 1983; Knauer 1969; Kostelanetz 1969d; Kostelanetz 1970d, illustration 58; Kuhn, M. 1969a; Kuhn, M. 1969b; Miller, L.E. 2002a, 163-165; Minneapolis Star 1969; Morner 1969a; Morner 1969b; News-Gazette 1969a; News-Gazette 1969b; Sumsion 1969a; Tartan 1969; Time 1969; Troxler 1976, 86-90; White, P.T. 1970; Willis 1969a; Willis 1969b).

September 1969. New York. In collaboration with Calvin Sumsion made Not Wanting to Say Anything about Marcel (artwork, Hollander Workshop) and wrote To Describe the Process of Composition Used in Not Wanting to Say Anything about Marcel.

10 September 1969. Venice, Teatro La Fenice, XXXII Biennale. John Tilbury (piano), the Philharmonic Orchestra of Slovenia and Marcello Panni (conductor) gave controversial performance of Concert for Piano and Orchestra during intermission of program with music by Earle Brown, Morton Feldman, and Erik Satie; also (around 10 September) Variations I (organ version) performed in the cathedral; Cage in attendance (Böhmer 1969a; Koch, G.R. 1969; Messinis 1969; Roschitz 1969).

22 September 1969. Warsaw, Warsaw Autumn. Warsaw Music Workshop performed Cartridge Music.

October 1969 or earlier. London. Performed from Diary: How to Improve the World; Concert for Piano and Orchestra and WBAI performed (Harrison, M. 1969).

15 October 1969. Corvallis, Oregon, Home Economic Auditorium. Performed parts three and four from Diary: How to Improve the World; question period; recorded on video tape for KOAC-TV earlier that day (Roeper 1969).

Fall 1969. Davis, California, University of California. Artist in Residence; conducted course, “Music in Dialogue”; classes, concert activities; visit to Sacramento; guest editor of Source 7-8; conceived Sound Anonymously Received, of which Cage or Stanley Lunetta gave first performance on Cracker Jack box; conceived and contributed to Mewantemooseicday, co-directed by Larry Austin, a one-day musical exposition centering around the music of Erik Satie, including first performance of 33 1/3; performed compositions by Satie, among them Vexations (with eleven others, 18 hours and 40 minutes); accompanied three songs by Satie sung by Patricia Woodbury; Peggy Salkind and Milton Salkind gave first complete performance of Satie, Socrate [arrangement for 2 pianos by John Cage] (Putah Creek Lodge); performed from Diary: How to Improve the World (Freeborn Hall, four excerpts) (21 November, 5:40-0:40); in December, began composing Cheap Imitation (Piano), completed 14 December 1969 in New York (Cage 1973h, 70; Dinwiddie 1970; Glackin 1969; Hurst 1969; Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 41).

Late 1969. Wrote Six Arts and Technology.

5 November 1969. Wilson, North Carolina, Atlantic Christian College, Howard Chapel, Contemporary Arts Festival. Neely Bruce performed HPSCHD (Henry, O.W. 1969).

1970. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, Center for Advanced Studies. Once more appointed Fellow (Snyder, E.J. 1970a, 41).

1970. Florida. Performed (Cage/Nyffeler 1970).

1970-1977. Made contribution to Museum of Drawers, compiled by Herbert Distel (1942).

8-12 January 1970. New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music, [Brooklyn] Festival of Dance. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (5-16 January): first performances of Cheap Imitation (piano) to Second Hand (8, 9, 12 January, Cage); other performances David Behrman, ... for Nearly an Hour... to Walkaround Time (8 January); Conlon Nancarrow, Studies for Player Piano No. 1-2, 4-5, 6-7 to Crises (tape); David Tudor, Rainforest to Rainforest (9 January); Pauline Oliveros, In Memoriam Nikola Tesla, Cosmic Engineer to Canfield; La Monte Young, 2 Sounds to Winterbranch; Christian Wolff, For 1, 2 or 3 People to Tread (10 January); Gordon Mumma, Mesa to Place; David Tudor, Rainforest to Rainforest (12 January) (Cunningham, M. 1982b, 181-182; Terry, W. 1970).

23 January 1970. Cleveland, Ohio, Cleveland Institute of Music, Kulas Hall, Lectures on Avant-Garde Music, organized by Cleveland Concert Associates. Performed two installments from Diary: How To Improve the World and Cheap Imitation (Finn 1970; Hruby 1970).

25 January 1970. Pasadena, California, Pasadena Art Museum (Colorado and Orange Grove Boulevards), Auditorium, Encounters 1970. Performed Cheap Imitation (piano) and from Diary: How to Improve the World (two of then unpublished installments), presented recording of HPSCHD; interviewed by Kimmis Hendrick the day before (Hendrick 1970; Leach 1970; Rockwell 1970).

4 February-circa 2 March 1970. Boston, Massachusetts, Harcus-Krakow Gallery (167 Newbury Street): exhibition of Not Wanting To Say Anything About Marcel (Baker, K. 1970; Smoliar 1970).

20-22 February 1970. Boston, Massachusetts. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (as part of a one-week residency in Massachusetts): lecture-demonstration (20 February, afternoon); performances of Christian Wolff, For 1, 2 or 3 People to Tread, Gordon Mumma, Mesa to Place, Pauline Oliveros, In Memoriam Nikola Tesla, Cosmic Engineer to Canfield (21 February, evening, John Hancock Hall); performances of Cheap Imitation to Second Hand; Rainforest; How to Pass, Kick, Fall and Run (22 February, matinee, John Hancock Hall); presented lithographs Not Wanting to Say Anything about Marcel (Fitzgerald 1970; Smoliar 1970).

February 1970. Storrs, Connecticut, University of Connecticut. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Cheap Imitation (piano) to Second Hand and presumably Rainforest (Stodelle 1970).

February 1970-Late 1972. Composed Cheap Imitation [orchestra].

23 February-13 March 1970. Orléans, Semaines Musicales d’Orléans. Gérard Frémy performed Cage’s music for prepared piano (25 February); Daniel Charles lectured on “John Cage ou la libération” (12 March, Université); Groupe d’Etudes et de Réalisations Musicales performed Concert for Piano and Orchestra in program with music by Earle Brown, Morton Feldman, Christian Wolff (13 March, C.R.D.P., 55 rue de Recouvrance); Cage presumably not attendance.

Early March-7 March 1970. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Organized by Pittsburgh Dance Council. During one-week residency (with the company: lecture-demonstrations, open rehearsals) performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Events (during the week on variouys locations), lecture-demonstration including La Monte Young, Two Sounds to Winterbranch (6 March, Carnegie Music Hall); open rehearsal (7 March, afternoon, Syria Mosque); Cheap Imitation (piano) to Second Hand; David Tudor, Rainforest; Christian Wolff, music to Tread (7 March, evening, Syria Mosque, concluding concert) (Beaman 1970; Miller, Do. 1970).

8-21 March 1970. Tampa, Florida, University of South Florida, Florida Center for the Arts, Residency Dance Series. Performed with David Behrman, Gordon Mumma, and Merce Cunningham Dance Company: Gym Event No. 6 (13 March, evening, Gymnasium); Gym Event No. 7 (14 March, evening. Gymnasium); Cheap Imitation to Second Hand; David Tudor, Rainforest; How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run (20 March); also performance on 21 March (Shenk 1970a; Shenk 1970b).

17 March 1970. Buffalo, New York, Kleinhans Music Hall. Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, Lukas Foss conducting, performed Variations III with Variations IV, as well as music by Lukas Foss; Cage participated with selection from Indeterminacy: New Aspect (Putnam 1970).

24 March 1970. New York, Whitney Museum, Audotorium. Philip Corner, George Flynn, Frederic Rzewski, and James Tenney performed Winter Music, as well as Morton Feldman, Two Pieces for Three Pianos and Piece for Four Pianos; Christian Wolff, Tilbury 1-3; Earle Brown, Corroberee (DeRhen 1970).

Late March 1970. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan University, Memorial Chapel. Lectured; probably read from Diary: How to Improve the World (You Will Only Make Matters Worse) Continued 1968 (Daseler 1970).

5 April or 4 May 1970. De Kalb, Illinois, Northern Illinois University. Presumably attended, performed.

8 April 1970 (evening). Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Dickinson College, Holland Union Social Hall. Received Dickinson College Arts Award, 1969-1970; performed Cheap Imitation (piano) and from Diary: How to Improve the World (Music Educators Journal 1970).

11 April 1970. Minneapolis, Minnesota, Macalester Field House, presented by Walker Art Center and Macalester College Music Department. Participated in performance of Musicircus with “AMFMTV” (clusters of televisions and radios tuned in on different channels); other participants were Gleason’s School for Gymnastics; harpist from Studio of Frances Gilman Miller; Earl Buys, piano; Frank Kellogg High School Concert Band, Mark Lammers, director; German Village Band of Stillwater; Dee Meader Ballroom Dancers; Minnesota Schuplattlers; Jerry Krueger, bird cage construction; University of Minnesota Chamber Orchestra; Swedish Folk Dancers; Elementary Orchestra, Independent School District #197; Hazbro and the Gonadeians; Ebenezer Community Choir, Carlos Anderson, director; Folk Singers, North Star Music; drummers and marimba players, Dahlgren Drum Shop and Marimba Studios; Ron Nameth, film; Metalized Mylar balloons, G. T. Schjeldahl Corporation; Macalester College (Noncert; Macalester Pipemen and Highland Dancers; Louise Wilson, soprano, and Chris Oldfater, piano; Rock Band; Dancers, Department of Speech and Dramatic Arts, Margie Maddux, director; Music Department, Harry Hammer and Alvin King; Art Department, Anthony Caponi and Roxanne Sorensen; Plant Maintenance Department, Stan Erickson; Sound and Light Department, Hal Pearson; Campus Security, William Jones; Information Services, Mary Hill; Macalester Food Service; Al McIvor and Joyce Madsen, campus programing; faculty and students); Helen Walker and Arnold Walker, coordinators (Bartell 1970; Charles 1970c; Hoeschler 1970; Ivins 1970).

14 April 1970. Minneapolis, Minnesota, Vocational High School (3rd Avenue South and 11th Street), 3 Composers Speak (Aaron Copland, Gunther Schuller, John Cage), sponsored by Women’s Association Minnesota Orchestra, Walker Art Center and the Minneapolis Public Schools: gave lecture-demonstration.

April 1970. Witten, Wittener Tage für neue Kammermusik. 26'1.1499" for a String Player with 27'10.554" for a Percussionist performed; Cage not in attendance.

18 May 1970 (8 p.m.). San Antonio, Texas, Marion Koogler McNay Art Institute, in conjenction with the exhibition of Not Wanting to Say Anything About Marcel. Jeanne Kirstein gave piano recital with music by Cage (Express and News 1970).

5-11 June 1970. Paris, ThéČtre de France, Configuration, under the auspices of the ThéČtre des Nations. Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor, and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Cheap Imitation to Second Hand (alone); Pauline Oliveros, In Memoriam: Nikola Tesla, Cosmic Engineer to Canfield; first performance of _ Week of _, presented as First Week of June to Signals (5 June); Rainforest; Tread; performed 0'00" (alone, 11 June); HPSCHD also performed during this Paris residence (Cadieu 1970a; Charles 1970c/1978, 151; Charles 1970f/1978, 148; Fleuret 1970b; Vaughan 1997, 176).

June 1970. In or near Amiens. Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor, Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (two performances) (Vaughan 1997, 176).

June 1970. Amiens, Maison de la Culture. Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor, Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (repertory performances) (Vaughan 1997, 176).

June 1970. Treigny, ChČteau de Ratilly. Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor, Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Event (Vaughan 1997, 176).

23 June-1 July 1970 (evenings). Holland Festival ’70 (15 June-9 July). Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor, and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company in two programs: How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run; Toshi Ichiyanagi, Activities for Orchestra to Scramble; David Tudor, Rainforest to Rainforest (23 June, Amsterdam, Stadsschouwburg; 24 June, Eindhoven, Stadsschouwburg; 30 June, Nijmegen, Stadsschouwburg); Cheap Imitation (piano, Cage) to Second Hand; Pauline Oliveros, In Memoriam Nikola Tesla, Cosmic Engineer to Canfield; Christian Wolff, For 1, 2 or 3 People to Tread (25 June, Arnhem, Stadsschouwburg; 26 June, Breda, Stadsschouwburg; 27 June, Rotterdam, Schouwburg; 29 June, Scheveningen, Circustheater; 1 July, Amsterdam, Stadsschouwburg); interviewed by Lieneke van Schaardenburg; with Cunningham interviewed by M.R. Ziegler (Amsterdam, Hotel Américain) (Cage/Schaardenburg 1970; Hartsuiker 1970; Vaughan 1997, 176; Vermeulen 1970a; Vermeulen 1970b; Vermeulen 1970c; Ziegler 1970).

2 July 1970. Paris. Interviewed by Daniel Caux and Jacqueline Caux (Cage/Caux and Caux 1972).

July 1970. Spoleto, Festival of Two Worlds. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company; wrote 36 Mesostics re and not re Marcel Duchamp (Vaughan 1997, 176).

July 1970. Interviewed by Max Nyffeler (Cage/Nyffeler 1970).

17-21 July 1970. Saint-Paul-de-Vence, Nuits de la Fondation Maeght. Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor, and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (performances on 17-19 and 21 July) (Vaughan 1997, 176).

August-October 1970. Stony Point, New York and New York. Composed Song Books.

August or September 1970. Venice, 33rd Biennale. Concert for Piano and Orchestra performed; Cage not in attendance (Böhmer 1970).

September 1970. Returned from Stony Point to New York (107 Bank Street in Greenwich Village), being content with renting a house near Stony Point during the summers (Cage/Zimmermann 1976; Cage 1973h, 195; Cage/Anonymous 1993a, 106; Revill 1992, 233).

1-12 October 1970. Madrid, III Festival de América y EspaĖa. Grupo Alea (with Alcides Lanza?) performed Atlas Eclipticalis; Cage presumably not in attendance (Romano, J. 1970).

13 October 1970. Cologne, Graphisches Kabinett in der Galerie Der Spiegel. Vernissage of exhibition, Not Wanting To Say Anything About Marcel; Cage’s attendance unlikely.

17 October 1970. Morristown, New Jersey, Delbarton School, Saint Mary’s Abbey Church. Presumably attended concert devoted to his works.

26-27 October 1970. Paris, Journées de Musique Contemporaine, organized by the Semaines Musicales Internationales de Paris (Maurice Fleuret, 19-27 October), Journées John Cage. Attended; films by Arnbom (1966), Richter (1947) and Wildenhahn (1966) shown (26 October, 12:30 pm, CinémathŹque Franćaise, Palais de Chaillot); Gérard Frémy performed Sonatas and Interludes (26 October, 4:30 pm, Musée d’Art Moderne); Groupe d’Etude et de Réalisation Musicales (GERM: Philippe Drogoz, contrabass; Franćoise Gagneux, percussion; Urs-Peter Schneider, Erika Radermacher, pianos; Renaud Gagneux, speaker), Pierre Mariétan, director, performed 26'1.1499" for a String Player, 27'10.554" for a Percussionist, 31'57.9864" for a Pianist, 34'46.776" for a Pianist, and 45' for a Speaker (26 October, 6:30 pm, Musée d’Art Moderne); was present on stage or performed 0'00" at first performance of Song Books, performed by Cathy Berberian and Simone Rist, performed simultaneously with Concert for Piano and Orchestra, performed by Groupe d’Etude et de Réalisation Musicales; Urs-Peter Schneider, piano; Pierre Mariétan, director, and Rozart Mix, prepared by the Groupe de Recherches Musicales de l’Office de Radiodiffusion-Télévision Franćaise (ORTF) and the Département de Musique de l’Université de Paris-Vincennes; question period afterwards (26 October, evening, ThéČtre de la Ville); public conversation with Daniel Charles (1935-2008) (27 October, 2:30 pm, Musée d’Art Moderne); Renaud Gagneux performed Music for Carillon No. 1-4 (27 October, 6 pm, Mairie du 1er arrondisement, St-Germain l’Auxerrois); Musicircus, co-ordinated by M. Davorin Jagodic (27 October, Halles de Baltard, Pavillon 9, cirque Jean Richard) (Boucourechliev 1970; Bourgeois 1970; Cadieu 1970b; Cadieu 1970d; Cage/Charles 1976, 25-55; Cage/Emmerik 1991, 77; Caux 1970a; Cotte 1970a; Cotte 1970b; Cotte 1970c; Cotte 1970d; D. D. T. 1970; Damian 1970a; Damian 1970b; Dandrel and Lonchampt 1970; F.S. 1970; Fleuret 1970a; Fleuret et al. 1971; Gaudibert 1971; Goléa 1970; Gousseland 1970; Halimi 1970; Helm 1970; Helm 1971a; International Herald Tribune 1970; Lonchampt 1970; M. N. 1970; McMullen 1971; Nussac 1970a; Nussac 1970b; Nyman 1970; Nyman 1974, 54; Oehlschlägel 1971a; Oehlschlägel 1971c; Pascal 1970a; Pascal 1970b; Pop Music 1970; Schneider, M. 1970a; Schneider, M. 1970b; Schneider, M. 1970c; Schneider, P. 1970; Sirvin 1970).

3-15 November 1970. Brooklyn, New York, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Opera House (3-15 November). Performed with David Behrman, Gordon Mumma, David Tudor, and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Cheap Imitation (piano) to Second Hand; Rainforest; Christian Wolff, For 1, 2 or 3 People to Tread (3 November); Pauline Oliveros, In Memoriam: Nikola Tesla, Cosmic Engineer to Canfield; First Week of November to Signals; Christian Wolff, For 1, 2 or 3 People to Tread (4 November); Cheap Imitation to Second Hand; David Behrman, ... for Nearly an Hour... to Walkaround Time (5 November); Alvin Lucier, Vespers to Objects (10 November) (Goldner 1970).

Prior to 7 November 1970. New York. Completed Mureau [text].

After 7 November 1970. Kalamazoo, Michigan, Western Michigan University. Performed Mureau with unidentified performers (Cage 1973h, xiii).

20 November 1970. New York, Studio School. Karen Phillips performed Dream (viola version?) as well as music by Georg Philipp Telemann, Paul Hindemith, Igor Stravinsky, Erik Satie, and Morton Feldman.

1971. Cincinnati, Ohio, Cincinnati Art Museum. Performed Mureau.

12 January 1971 (afternoon). Cincinnati, Ohio, Contemporary Arts Center (116 East Fifth Street). Vernissage of exhibition “Marcel Duchamp, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, John Cage” (Cage’s Not Wanting to Say Anything about Marcel on exhibit); Jeanne Kirstein performed a program of Cage’s music for prepared piano and toy piano (Findsen 1971; Rose 1971a).

Prior to 22 January 1971 (two days). Colgate University and Reid Athletic Centre. Performed with Gordon Mumma (one performance in College Chapel); interviewed by Franck Jotterand (Cage/Jotterand 1971).

22 or 23 January 1971. Chicago, Illinois. Performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: Cheap Imitation to Second Hand and other music (Willis 1971).

March-June 1971. New York. Composed Sixty-two Mesostics re Merce Cunningham.

3-31 March 1971. Milan, Galleria Schwarz. Not Wanting to Say Anything about Marcel on exhibit (Rose, B. 1971c).

1971 or 1972?. New York. Recorded 4'33" [version without instruments and in four movements] for film, A Tribute to John Cage, by Nam June Paik and John Godfrey (Cage 1973h, 140).

12 March 1971 (evening). New York, New York University, Loeb Student Center, Eisner and Lubin Auditorium, presented by New York University School of Continuing Education. Conducted a chamber concert of his electronic music (New York Post 1970).

7 April 1971. New York, New York Cultural Center: Maro Ajemian performed Sonatas and Interludes; Cage’s attendance uncertain (Henahan 1971).

12-13 April 1971. Ann Arbor, Michigan, Hill Auditorium. Performed with Gordon Mumma, David Tudor, and Merce Cunningham and Dance Company: open rehearsals, seminar on electronic music, lecture-demonstration of Pauline Oliveros, In Memoriam: Nikola Tesla, Cosmic Engineer to Canfield (12 April); How to Pass, Kick, Fall, and Run (13 April) (Elliot 1971; Ellis, L. 1971).

14-15 April 1971. Bloomington, Indiana, Indiana University. Attended and performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (14 April?, Auditorium); question period (15 April, evening, Music 404) (Hranchak 1971).

19-21 April 1971. Milwaukee, University of Wisconsin. Interviewed (20 April); performed with Merce Cunningham and Dance Company (21 April, Performing Arts Center) (Monfried 1971).

25 April 1971. Witten, Märkisches Museum, Wittener Tage für neue Kammermusik. Ensemble Musiques nouvelles Bruxelles performed Variations I with Variations II; Cage not in attendance.

26 April 1971. Paris, Grand AmphithéČtre de la Faculté de Droit (92, Rue d’Assas). Arlette Sibon-Simonovitch presented ‘Martenot 2000’, with first performances of unidentified compositions by Cage and Marcel Goldman, as well as compositions by Aperghis, Olivier Messiaen, Mestres-Quadreny, Parmegiani, performed by Jacqueline Méfano, piano, Sylvio Gualda, percussion, and André Gicquel, ‘instruments Baschet,’ supervised by Konstantin Simonovitch.

7 May 1971. San Jose, California, San Jose State College, Concert Hall. San Jose State College Music Depertment New Music Ensemble performed Cage program; Cage presumably not in attendance.

20-22 May 1971. San Francisco, California, Golden Gate Park, M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, Hearst Court, Three Evenings with John Cage. Performed Diary: How to Improve the World (Continued) and Cheap Imitation (piano) (20 May); performed Song Books with Rozart Mix, Concert for Piano and Orchestra with the San Francisco Conservatory of Music New Music Ensemble, Howard Hersh, director (21-22 May); Cage possibly participated in a preview broadcast (19 May, evening, KPFA radio) (Brian 1971).

Between May-September 1971. Stony Point, New York. Interviewed by Alcides Lanza (Cage/Lanza 1971).

July 1971. Composed Program (KNOBS) for the Listener, in collaboration with Lejaren Hiller.

Fall (October?), 1971. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Campus, Center for Twentieth-Century Studies. Conceived and performed Demonstration of the Sounds of the Environment (Cage 1973h, xiii; Cage/Helms 1972/1978, 27).

21 September 1971, evening. Athens, Kotopouli (Rex) Theatre (48, Panepistimou [Venizelou] Avenue), 4th Hellenic Week of Contemporary Music (19-26 September 1971), organized by the Hellenic Association for Contemporary Music. Spiros Sakkas (baritone) gave first performance of Sixty-two Mesostics re Merce Cunningham in program (given with pianist N. Semitecolo) with music by Anton Webern, Arnold Schönberg, Igor Stravinsky, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Yorgo Kouroupos, I. Vlachopoulos, and Theodore Antoniou (Gradenwitz 1972; Schiffer 1971).

26 September 1971. Warsaw, Warsaw Autumn. Silesian Philharmonic Orchestra Katowice, Dutkiewicz (piano), Taverna (conductor), performed Concert for Piano and Orchestra; Ptaszyńska performed 27'10.554" for a Percussionist (New York Times 1971).

15 October 1971. San Francisco, California, Golden Gate Park, M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, Hearst Court. In its opening concert of the 1971-1972 season, San Francisco Conservatory of Music New Music Ensemble performed Sixty-two Mesostics re Merce Cunningham (erroneously announced as first performance).

15-17 October 1971. Nevers, Maison de la Culture de Nevers et de la NiŹvre (boulevard Pierre-de-Coubertin), Journées Musicales 3: John Cage. Concerts, presentations of recordings, and lectures; Cage presumably not in attendance (Bosseur, J.-Y. et al. 1971-1972; Journal du Centre 1971; Montagne 1971).

November 1971. Possibly in London.

December 1971 or earlier. New York, Martha Jackson Gallery. Exhibition (Arts Magazine 1971).

December 1971. New York. Composed Les chants de Maldoror pulvérisés par l’assistance mźme.